NOVEMBER 2016

  • UCLN WORKSHOPS -SOIL HEALTH,WEED BUSTERS
  • LANDCARE 30TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS AT NEWHAM AND PARLIAMENT HOUSE
  • VISIT TO BALD HILL RESERVE BY KYNETON SECONDARY COLLEGE STUDENTS
  • FRIENDS OF TRENTHAM CREEKS AND RESERVES JOINS UCLN
  • UCLN AT KYNETON SHOW
  • NEWS AND EVENTS
  • GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

 

What a busy couple of months it has been, with so many events ranging from wildflower walks to rabbit buster workshops to 30th Landcare birthday celebrations. The last of the UCLN workshops for the year are happening in December, so come along if you are interested in Soil Health or the latest on how to deal with weeds.

 

"the history of every nation is eventually written in the way in which it cares for its soil.The nation which destroys its soil destroys itself." Franklin Roosevelt US President 1933 -1945

“The history of every nation is eventually written in the way in which it cares for its soil. The nation which destroys its soil destroys itself.”  Franklin Roosevelt US President 1933 -1945

 

UCLN Workshops – Soil Heath and Weed Busters in November

 

Anyone interested in learning how to get a better understanding of the health of their soil will benefit from attending a free Soil Health Workshop being run by the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network, Department of Agriculture and Langley Landcare  in Edgecombe on December 13th. The workshop will teach participants how to evaluate the condition of their soil and use good practice  management techniques to improve its health.

Langley Landcare member Rob Pearse said “After nine years on the property I have learnt about soil health and how critical it is – not only for my olives but for the health of my grazing animals. This workshop is a fantastic opportunity for small or large landowners to learn how to improve the health of their soil.”

Attendees will be asked to bring in a soil sample from their properties and will be taught how to identify possible soil health issues using nine simple visual tests. They will also learn how to use a Soil Health Score Card to provide information on the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of their soil. Understanding soil types, applying the appropriate management practices and monitoring soil quality are all important steps towards protecting and improving soil health.

 

Martin Hamilton from the Department of Agriculture will be leading the workshop utilizing the latest Soil Health Guide produced for North Central Victoria.“Soil is the key to all health and knowing about your soil empowers you to manage it more sustainably. Attendees will go home knowing more about their soil and what to do to maintain good soil.” said Martin.

Martin Hamilton from the Department of Agriculture will be leading the workshop utilizing the latest Soil Health Guide produced for North Central Victoria.“Soil is the key to all health and knowing about your soil empowers you to manage it more sustainably. Attendees will go home knowing more about their soil and what to do to maintain good soil.” said Martin.

 

There will be a 45 minute presentation on soil science then participants will get their hands dirty on the beautiful olive farm at Edgecombe where the workshop is being held. A free lunch will be provided.

 The ancient Greek philosopher Xenophon said around 400 B.C  – “To be a successful farmer one must first know the nature of their soil.”

RSVP’s are essential to Martin Hamilton 54304802 or martin.hamilton@ecodev.vic.gov.au by 8th Dec

 

 

Learn How to identify and address weed problems whether your property is large or small.Jan Elders and Barbara James from Campaspe Valley landcare are seen here discussing weed control techniques in a paddock of thistles.

Learn how to identify and address weed problems whether your property is large or small. Jan Elder and Barbara James from Campaspe Valley landcare are seen here discussing weed control techniques in a paddock of thistles.

 

With all the rain over winter and the weather finally starting to warm up the weeds are out in full force. If you want to know effective ways to address them then why not come along to the Weed Busters workshop at Bald Hill Reserve on December 3 and learn from experts. The information is suitable for large and small landowners.

The Upper Campaspe Landcare Network, in conjunction with The Friends of Bald Hill Reserve, Department of Agriculture and the Macedon Ranges Shire Council, is hosting the workshop from 10 am at the reserve. A delicious free lunch will be provided.

Advice will be given on cost effective  and efficient ways of dealing with weeds. Attendees will leave with an improved understanding  of the most suitable and effective ways to deal with weeds. Even though everyone’s situation is different, management options  presented at the workshop will guide participants towards practical and achievable solutions.

Martin Deering, biosecurity officer from Department of Agriculture, as well as Natural Resource Officer from the Macedon Ranges Shire Council Beau Kent will  be on hand to speak about  the latest effective methods of weed control. There will also be a landowner with 20 years’ experience of successfully managing broome and blackberry on a 20-acre block sharing their story.

The workshop includes a practical component, with various equipment (such as the highly effective eco blade) on hand giving examples of what works best for different problems.

RSVP: 5421 9660 or environment@mrsc.vic.gov.au by November 30.

 Landcare 30th Birthday Celebrations at Newham.

 

A visit to the Aboriginal Quarry Site at Mt William was part of the Landcare Forum celebrating 30 years of Landcare held at Newhman recently.Pic by Kylie McKay

A visit to the Aboriginal Quarry Site at Mt William was part of the Landcare Forum celebrating 30 years of Landcare held at Newhan recently. Pic by Kylie McKay

 

Three different Landcare Networks, the Macedon Ranges Shire Council and Port Phillip Catchment Management Authority recently celebrated Landcare’s 30th Birthday in Victoria at a Forum in Newham.

Opening the well-attended event was newly elected Macedon Ranges Shire Councillor Natasha Gayfer who said the special event marked an important anniversary, and it was an occasion to say “a big thank you to everyone who has been involved in landcare over the past three decades.”

Macedon Ranges Shire Council’s environment coordinator, Michelle Wyatt, outlined some of the important work being carried out in the environmental field, and answered a range of questions.

The day  shared landcare success stories, a presentation from Mount Rothwell Conservation Centre about saving Victorian animals from the brink of extinction, and a visit to the Mount William Stone Axe Quarry with a Wurundjeri elder .

The presentations outlined the importance of collaboration and working together. As Tim Bloomfield said “A landowner working on their own can make a difference, as part of a community working together landowners can make a difference in the landscape.”

I recently attended another 30th anniversary for Landcare in Victoria at Queens Hall, Parliament House Melbourne. It was attended by over 200 people. Alice Knight OAM was announced as the winner of the 2016 Joan Kirner Award, and 10 Landcare Executive Committee Service Awards were awarded to 10 Community Landcarers.

The Parliamentary Secretary for Energy, the Environment and Climate Change, Anthony Carbines presented the awards. Most attendees were community Landcarers who have been involved in the Landcare movement for decades. Go to  LandcareAwards

Congratulations to all Victorian Landcarers for 30 years of achievements and on ground activities.

 

 

Visit to Bald Hill Reserve by Kyneton Secondary College Students.

Kyneton Secondary College student Charlotte Arlow is seen here examining a wax lip orchid at Bald Hill Reserve during their recent visit.

“I find that nature is very beautiful, its so amazing how life works-how the flowers are created and what colours they have,’ said Kyneton Secondary College student Charlotte Arlow  seen here examining a wax lip orchid at Bald Hill Reserve during the schools  recent visit to Bald Hill Reserve.

 

Environmental science students from Kyneton Secondary College undertook detective work at Bald Hill Reserve to research a project investigating the flora and fauna of the reserve. They also helped install nest boxes and remote cameras which will monitor arboreal mammals, such as the threatened phascogale.

Their project was part of a new collaboration between the Friends of Bald Hill, the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network, Macedon Ranges Shire Council and the Environmental Science Program at the school.

Students each picked a native species from the Bald Hill Management Plan which they then had to find at the reserve.

Many chose some of the beautiful wildflowers which were on display on the day.

The students worked closely with Carolyn Robb, President of the Friends of Bald Hill Reserve, who helped locate plants for the students, guided them through the reserve, and gave a visual presentation at the school regarding the ecology of Bald Hill.

 

year nine and 10 environmental science students from Kyneton Secondary College undertook detective work at Bald Hill Reserve to research a project investigating the flora and fauna of the reserve. They also helped install nest boxes and remote cameras which will monitor arboreal mammals, such as the threatened phascogale.

Year 9 and 10 environmental science students from Kyneton Secondary College undertook detective work at Bald Hill Reserve to research a project investigating the flora and fauna of the reserve. They also helped install nest boxes and remote cameras which will monitor arboreal mammals, such as the threatened phascogale.

 

They helped install nest boxes and remote cameras using GPS to record their locations, and will be involved in monitoring the resulting data in conjunction with the Friends of Bald Hill and the Macedon Ranges Shire Council.

Council environmental officer William Terry said it was important that students learnt about protecting our local ecosystems if we were going to have any chance of protecting our endangered species.

“We are hoping to record evidence of arboreal animals such as the brush tailed phascogale, the sugar and squirrel gliders, and the agile antechinus. The nest boxes and remote cameras will help give us a broader understanding of the important flora and fauna in this reserve.”

Teacher Cindy Bradford said the students gained valuable field study experience using modern monitoring techniques and got an understanding of how to preserve the flora and fauna of Bald Hill Reserve.

For media go to Detectives Bald Hill

Kyneton Secondary College Student Penny Caleo helps President of Campasep River and Land management group at a planting day on the Campaspe. River.

Kyneton Secondary College Student Penny Caleo helps President of Campaspe River and Land management group Peter Harding at a planting day on the Campaspe River recently. About 400 plants were planted purchased as part of a One Tree Per Child Grant.

 

Year seven and eight Kyneton Secondary College students also helped out the Campaspe River and Land Management Group recently planting 400 trees along the Campaspe River. The trees were purchased with funding from The One Tree Per Child grant.

“Community comes from the word communion, to share a common task together. And it is in the sharing of that task that people do bigger than they knew they were capable of. Then there is something to celebrate.” Mathew Fox

 

 

Friends Of Trentham Creeks and Reserves joins UCLN

 

Jan Robertson,Jill McCallum from Friends OF Trentham Creeks and Reserves,and Manu from Trentham Primary School at Trent Creek Trentham.The group will be working at removing weeds and replanting vegetation along the creek in Trentham.They were recently successful in receiving Riparian Grant

Jan Robertson and Jill McCallum from Friends Of Trentham Creeks and Reserves, and Manu from Trentham Primary School at Trent Creek Trentham. The group will be working at removing weeds and replanting vegetation along the creek in Trentham. They were recently successful in receiving a Riparian Grant to help carry out the work.

I would like to welcome the Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves to the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network. The group  has been very active in dealing with weeds, revegetating native species and building walking tracks close to the Trentham township. They have recently joined our Network.

They were successful in the latest riparian grant applications and will be busy working on restoring the vegetation along Trent Creek. The area has two species listed as ‘rare’ in Victoria –  the  Brooker gum –Euccalyptus brookeriana , and the Floodplain Fireweed -Senecio campylocarpus, and riparian forest (EVC18) listed as vulnerable in the Central Highlands Bioregion.  Trentham Primary School children and the Trentham Historical Society will be involved in the project, which is the site of a historic swimming pool.

 

Heavy rainfall has meant this year is especially good for wildflowers.This swamp daisy was seen recently at Bald Hill Reserve.Pic Scheltema

Heavy rainfall has meant this year is especially good for wildflowers. This swamp daisy was seen recently at Bald Hill Reserve.Pic Scheltema

 

UCLN at Kyneton Show.

UCLN was at Kyneton show recently, alongside the MRSC and NCCMA marques. There was a lot if interest in our display with many requests from people on how to get involved and be part of the Landcare Community. Thank you to everyone who helped out on the day, especially Brendan Smith from the Network and Tylden Landcare who worked very hard giving away plants and answering endless questions about what are the best plants to plant where.

 

 

 

 

Wax Lip Orchid at Bald Hill Reserve.To see more Bald Hill Reserve wildflowers you can go to the new website www.friendsofbaldhillreserve.com.au

Wax Lip Orchid at Bald Hill Reserve.To see more Bald Hill Reserve wildflowers you can go to the new website www.friendsofbaldhillreserve.com.au

 

Congratulations to President of Bald Hill Reserve Carolyn Robb for the lovely new website www.friendsofbaldhillreserve.com.au 

 

Due to the recent heavy rains,wildflowers are abundant this year,Seen at Bald Hill Reserve recently was this Leopard Orchid.Pic Scheltema

Due to the recent heavy rains, wildflowers are abundant this year. Seen at Bald Hill Reserve recently was this Leopard Orchid.Pic Scheltema

 

 

 

 

Events

 

 

 

Spotlight night at Bald Hill Reserve
MRSC and the Friends of Bald Hill Reserve are hosting a special night spotlight walk to search for animals such as possums, owls and gliders.

Saturday 10 December
Bald Hill Reserve
9pm start
Good shoes and a torch are a must

Book now →

 

 

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Landcare in Focus

Here is the November edition of Landcare in Focus, in this issue you’ll hear from topic experts and researchers, Landcarers and groups, and farmers and government initiatives in articles that touch on grazing management for improved productivity and profitability, soil resource management, and variable rainfall response.

LandCareInFocus

 

 

Junior Landcare November Issue

If you are interested in Junior Landcare news you can view the issue here   JuniorLandcare

 

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Grant Opportunities.

If your group is thinking about funding opportunities you may want to look at some of these grants. Dont forget to ask me for help if you need it in applications.

 

 

New Junior Landcare grants opening in 2017

A new Junior Landcare grants program was launched recently at the ResourceSmart Schools Awards in Melbourne.  Applications will open in February 2017 for the Momentum Energy Junior Landcare Grants, which will fund 200 projects in Victoria.

Grants worth $1,000 will be on offer for projects that will help young people play an active role in ensuring the safe future of their environment. All Victorian schools, childcare centres, and youth groups are eligible to apply. More info here:  JuniorGrants

 

The Australian Government’s Department of Social Services is inviting volunteer-based community groups and networks to apply for the 2016 Volunteer Grants funding.

These grants aim to support the efforts of volunteers by providing small amounts of money that organisations and community groups can use to help their volunteers.

Funding available: grants of between $1,000 and $5,000

Funding for: community-based groups and networks to buy equipment (e.g. computers), or help with training volunteers, fuel costs or undertaking background security checks etc. See guidelines (via link below) for a comprehensive list of eligible and ineligible items.

Application period: from 08 November 2016 until 2pm -20 December 2016

More information, guidelines & application form: go to

Volunteer grants

General enquiries: 1800 020 283

 

Bjarne K Dahl Trust

The Dahl Trust focuses on the conservation of eucalyptus trees and education of the public in areas of conservation, propagation, cultural and historical significance. Grants are capped at $15,000.

T: 03 8648 6510
E: enquiries@dahltrust.org.au
W: www.dahltrust.org.au/grants/

 

Fifteen Trees

This company was set up to help businesses create a smaller foot print when it comes to their vehicles and carbon production. Landcare groups can benefit through gaining plants to plant in their areas. Landholders need to be a member of an environmental community group (such as Landcare) to receive trees. Trees may be planted on private or public land. On-going opportunity.

T: 0400 040 659
E: filippa@15trees.com.au
W: www.15trees.com.au

 

Norman Wettenhall Foundation

These grants focus primarily on the enhancement and protection of flora and fauna in rural Victoria. Landscape Restoration Project support and facilitate the vision-building process. Landscape Restoration Fellowships make a significant difference to the capacity of a person to achieve the goals of significant landscape restoration projects. Various obligations are requested under these grant schemes. For project ideas go to ‘Grants awarded’ on their website. Small Environmental Grants Scheme: $5,000 and $10,000

T: 03 5472 1316 or 0431 219 980
E: beth@nwf.org.au
W: www.nwf.org.au

 

R E Ross Trust

The Trust will consider applications for  protection and preservation of Australian flora and fauna. Grants can be sought for up to $30,000 for up to three years. Your organisation must have an ABN ,operates within Victoria and be incorporated. On going.

T: 03 9690 6255
E: information@rosstrust.org.au
W: www.rosstrust.org.au

 

 

An entry in the recent Archibald Prize competition by artist Michael Mc Williams called The Usurpers.It is of introduced species that have had the most impact onthe environment,including Man.

An entry in the recent Archibald Prize competition by artist Michael McWilliams called The Usurpers.It is of introduced species that have had the most impact on the environment, including Man.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 2016

  • Coliban Connections Field Day
  • Kyneton Secondary College and Latrobe Uni Students work with UCLN Landcare Groups
  • Serrated Tussock Information, funding and brochures
  • National Landcare Conference
  • Phascogales and Langley Landcare
  • Rabbit Buster Workshop
  • News, Events and Information.

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Welcome to our spring ENews for the UCLN. What a wonderful wet spring, however I am sure most of us are ready for some warmer drier weather. I hope you can attend some of the fantastic  events on offer to the Landcare and broader community.

The National Landcare Conference was held recently in Melbourne. I was inspired by a range of different speakers and will use some of these ideas to help our Network continue to grow and support the important work you are all doing.

 

Coliban Connections Field Day

Some of the participants at the Coliban Corridor Field Day.Pic John Walter

Some of the participants at the Coliban Connections Field Day.                                                                            Pic John Walter

 

 

UCLN’s second Field Day  was held in July, with expert grassland and wetland ecologists, Damien Cook and Paul Foreman visiting the Coliban River, Kangaroo Creek and the Little Coliban River.

President of Malmsbury Landcare John Walter said the field day gave participants a chance to learn from experts the values inherent within the environment, and how a community working together can help restore degraded sites.

Brendan Smith, the president of Tylden Landcare, guided participants through a successful re-vegetation project along the little Coliban River.

“In 2004 the Little Coliban River was a silent ooze through the crack willows.

“There was no light coming in, no noise coming out. Now these elements have changed, and it’s alive with the sound of birdlife and full of animals like swamp wallabies with some trees more than eight metres high.”

Despite cold and rainy weather the field day was well  was attended by about 55 people.

There were many positive comments from participants about the speakers, variety of sites and general organisation. For media go to Rivers the Lifeblood

 

Kyneton Secondary College and Latrobe Uni Students work with our Landcare Groups.

 

 

 

Students from Kyneton Secondary College Estelle, Tiarna and Charlotte, with teacher Dr Anwyn Chapman, planting on National School Trees Day with the Kyneton River and Land Management Group.The group planted over 500 trees on the day. Student Georgia Brown said "We planted a range of indigenous plants including the local threatened species,The Hairy Anchor Plant,which only grows in this part of the catchment."

Students from Kyneton Secondary College Estelle, Tiarna and Charlotte, with teacher Dr Anwyn Chapman, planting on National School Trees Day with the Kyneton River and Land Management Group.The group planted over 580 trees on the day. Student Georgia Brown said “We planted a range of indigenous plants including the local threatened species, the Hairy Anchor Plant, which only grows in this part of the catchment.”

 

“Growing and nurturing the Landcare community is a priority if we are to nurture our Land.” said Liddy Neville, from the Bellarine Landcare group, one of the speakers at the recent National Landcare Conference in Melbourne .

One way the UCLN is growing the Landcare Community is by developing a partnership with students and teachers at the Kyneton Secondary College.We are also working with  students from Latrobe Uni to undertake some  valuable GIS mapping. So far the students have visited Malmsbury and Newham Landcare projects to commence mapping their projects in a way that is compatible with the NCCMA, and which will eventually be loaded onto the UCLN website. This partnership will continue over the next year with more groups being mapped in conjunction with the students.

Thanks to the Campaspe River and Land Management Group (CR&LMG), students from the Kyneton Secondary College Sustainability Group and Year 9/10 Environmental Science class recently spent time repopulating the  Campaspe  River with 580 native trees.

This important project involves several community groups coming together to protect our waterways and native vegetation in the Kyneton area.

Mark Ridgeway, Principal of KSC said “Striving for environmental sustainability is an important part of our school vision and one of our school’s core values. We strongly value community participation and providing opportunities for our students to learn how to be global citizens and engage with community projects.”

Peter Harding from the CR&LMG group said  “We are appreciative of the immense effort the students of Kyneton secondary College contributed to further the cause of rehabilitating the Campaspe River. The CR&LMG is a small community group and by partnering with the Secondary College we can do better together.”

For media on this event go to Campaspe Planting

Nest boxes painted by KSC students Alex,Bella and Bailey in preparation for installation at Bald Hill Reserve.

Nest boxes painted by KSC students Alex, Bella and Bailey in preparation for installation at Bald Hill Reserve. “Its nice to know that in a year or so phascogales or possum families might be making a home in them and we are making a difference.”

 

During National Environmental Science Week  Carolyn Robb, President of Friends of Bald Hill Reserve, William Terry (Environmental  Officer from the Macedon Ranges Shire Council) and myself spoke to year 9 & 10 Environmental students at Kyneton Secondary College about the work of the UCLN, Bald Hill Reserve and the importance of preserving such a special area.  

We asked the students what they learned…

“…that there are over 130 species of flowers at the Bald Hill Reserve.” Tiara

“ …that sugar glider are very soft and that there once were aboriginals at Bald Hill.” Hervey

“…about the different plants and animals at the Reserve. I didn’t realise there were so many endangered species there.” Nikki

“…that the Reserve was used by the military for 80 years before becoming a nature reserve.  It was used as a shooting range and training ground for the Light Horse Brigade.” Liam

“…that Bald Hill Reserve has many diverse areas for animals to thrive such as brush tailed possums, kangaroos and phascogales.” Zoe

“…the sounds of various different birds and what is their ecological status.” Paige

“……The speakers were engaging and the talk was very interesting.”  Zoe

SERRATED TUSSOCK INFORMATION, FUNDING AND BROCHURES

The Victorian Serrated Tussock Working Party (VSTWP) are keen to provide  information/brochures to groups in isolated areas of serrated tussock. They would like to mail/post out some information sheets on identification and management controls, and see if your group needs any help managing the weed.

There is currently a Landcare Field Day Assistance Grant program that aims to help groups host a serrated tussock related field day. It offers Landcare groups the opportunity to receive a one off grant of up to $500 to sponsor the convening of serrated tussock focused field days.

The grant is available to any landcare group that is incorporated and insured , and will be useful in raising the awareness to landowners and managers about the threat posed by this noxious weed. To further support the field day, the VSTWP will provide extension material on serrated tussock identification and management.

The guidelines and application form are on the website below and can be submitted to Executive Officer: Doug.May@ecodev.vic.gov.au

Tussock grants

Please let Ivan Cater  (ivancarter@gmail.com) know if your group  needs serrated tussock identification and management brochures.

 

NATIONAL LANDCARE CONFERENCE

 

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“I’d like to take a moment to recognize the important work undertaken by all of the groups and networks that give their time to care for Victoria’s land, water and biodiversity.Their dedication, enthusiasm and hard work is inspiring, and they too should be celebrated.”

“Landcare plays an important role managing our environment, actively engaging communities to improve the health of our land and water systems.”

  Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio

The 2016 National Landcare Conference was called Collaborative Communities – Landcare In Action.

Environment Minister Ms D’Ambrosio  announced the new Victorian Landcare website, a revamped and improved home for Victoria’s Landcare network to improve the communication tools available to Landcarers. I am pleased to say that a picture of one of our groups, The Friends Of Bald Hill, was picked to be on the home page.

The new website should be easier to use and provide simple tools to engage, access and share information between Landcare groups across Victoria. To view the new website  visit www.landcarevic.org.au

 

Some quotes I thought worth repeating from the conference:

“… Land is best managed at a landscape level.”

“…People working in the landscape cooperating together are much more effective.”

“…PEOPLE WILL LEAD – OUR LEADERS NEED TO FOLLOW.”

“…The change will come from individuals working at the local level.”

“…We need to tell our politicians what we are doing”

“…The youth of Landcare are really important.”

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 “… We need to get the young people engaged, and capture the enthusiasm of youth.”

 ” …Thinking globally but acting locally has always been one of Landcares strengths.”

 “… We need to reconnect people with nature.”

 ” …Human health and happiness is linked to the health of our environment.”

 ” …Landcare is about collaborative communities.”

 ” …Supporting Landcare is an investment in Australia’s future.”

 ” …We need to put the community at the centre of our decision making.”

The assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister Luke Hartsyker MP said “the hidden strength of Landcare is your ability to effectively link volunteers, farmers, land managers and many other stakeholders groups to the knowledge that will define the future of effective natural resource management across the natural environment, our farms and communities.”

The Andrews Labor Government  this year provided $18 million of new funding over four years to the Victorian Landcare Program, taking the total investment to almost $40 million. For more information on the conference go to www.landcarevic.org.au

 

Phascogales and Langley Landcare

 

A phascogale found by Langley LandcarePresident. Graham Connel

A phascogale found recently by Langley Landcare President Graham Connell midway between Black Hill Reserve and the Campaspe River at Langley.

 

Langley Landcare is working on placing covenants on areas of conservation significance. This helps animals such as the vulnerable phascogale move from Black Hill Reserve down to the Campaspe River.

Some of the Langley Landcare plantings that were lost in the Jan 2015 fires are successfully regrowing. The group is doing ongoing maintenance, weed control and replanting dead and damaged trees along the Jim Poulter creek, which forms part of the biolink between Black Hill Reserve and the Campaspe River.

President Graham Connell said “Langley Landcare works closely with the NCCMA to fence off important parts of the River and advice on planting riparian areas. We want to protect and enhance remnant vegetation with private landowners in conjunction with the NCCMA, Connecting Country and the UCLN. We want to help educate private landowners on the environmental values of their properties and how they fit into the bigger picture.”

 

 

Fascinating phascogale feet.

Fascinating phascogale feet. This one, found recently in Langley, is being preserved for educational purposes.

 

 

Funded by a gorse task force grant obtained by the UCLN, Brendan Smith from Tylden Landcare  is working with Langley Landcare to eradicate gorse. “This is having a community benefit due to the fact it is reducing fuel loads caused by gorse infestation.” said Graham.

Graham has organised to have the phascogale he found preserved for educational purposes after receiving the necessary permits from DELWP. All the valuable work groups such as Langley are doing will help vulnerable, rare and threatened species such as the phascogale to survive.

 

Langley Landcare is continuing with their important work planting along waterways linking the Black Hill Reserve to the Campaspe River.

Langley Landcare is continuing with their important work planting along waterways linking the Black Hill Reserve to the Campaspe River which is helping to connect areas of remnant vegetation and create wildlife corridors.

 

 

Rabbit Buster Workshop

Landowner Richard Fooks,Biosecurity Officer MartinDeering from Dep Agriculture,Malmbsury Landcare member Rob Burdett and contractor Michael Blake plan the upcoming Rabbit Buster workshop in Malmsbury. Pic Scheltema

Landowner Richard Fooks, Biosecurity Officer MartinDeering from Dep Agriculture, Malmbsury Landcare member Rob Burdett and contractor Michael Blake plan the upcoming Rabbit Buster workshop in Malmsbury. Pic Scheltema

 

UCLN and Malmsbury and District Landcare have been working together to prepare the first of three workshops to be held this year, the Rabbit Buster Workshop.

Whether your property is small or large, there will be expert free advice from the Department of Agriculture on how to control them. And a free lunch!

 

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Events and Newsletters

LATEST VICTORIAN LANDCARE MAGAZINE

Issue 67 of the Victorian Landcare and Catchment Management magazine celebrates the 30th anniversary of Landcare and looks towards the future.

Stories in this issue include:

  • Reflections of a young Landcare leader:
  • Stories from a number of long-running groups regarding their achievements and resilience
  • Reflections from respected landcarers, Lyn Coulston, Peter Forster and Alice Knight
  • Rob Youl explores the development of Landcare – from local community action to international movement
  • FTLA looks to the future: over 75 FTLA members discuss the challenges and opportunities ahead for the next 30 years of Landcare

Read it here:   Issue 67 Landcare Mag

 

 

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The NCCMA Landcare team have asked UCLN to extend an invitation to you all to attend  the ‘30th Anniversary of Landcare Celebration event’ on Saturday October 15 2016 in St Arnaud.

Please find the  event details and RSVP information on the invite by clicking here – 30th Event.

 

Macedon Ranges Shire Environment Events 2016-17

The shire have a great program of environment events for the year ahead featuring Tim Flannery, woodland birds, spotlight tours and more.

Click here to view their event calendar 2016

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NCCMA CHAT

Yes I know it is almost October and the new one will be out soon but here is the September issue in case you haven’t read it.  CLICK HERE

 

 

Threatened species: we do have time to turn it around if there is political will.

And finally a very interesting article on threatened species by Margaret Blakers in the Guardian. Threatened species: we do have time to turn it around if there is political will. Guardian-Threatened Species

 

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Cats kill an estimated 75 million native animals across Australia every night. Australia has the highest extinction rate of native species on earth.The impact of feral cats has been recognised as one of the major threats to Australia’s unique native and endangered wildlife. In many cases, feral cats could be the final threat that causes a species to become extinct. Take part in the first study of its kind click here – PARTICIPATE IN SURVEY ›

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I was asked to include this in our Newsletter for those who may wish to control feral animals on their properties.

 

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JULY 2016

  • Successful Cobaw Campaspe Biolinks Field Day.
  • Gorse Task Force Funding Available.
  • Landcare Groups Unite to Protect Waterways.
  • UCLN to work with Kyneton Secondary College Students.
  • Weed and Rabbit Buster Workshops.
  • New Victorian Minister for the Environment.
  • Committees, Recruitment and Succession.
  • Feathermap Project.
  • Grant Opportunities and Events.
  • North Central Chat.

 

WInter is here! ©Scheltema

Winter is here! ©Scheltema

 

Welcome to the July edition of the UCLN Newsletter. It is definitely winter, with  snow ball fights on the trampoline and the dam slowly filling with the welcome rain.

For those groups who have done Autumn planting the rain will be a great help in getting trees and other vegetation established. I hope you enjoy our winter news from the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network. Remember to keep me informed of anything your group may be doing, and that you may need some help with.

Frosty winter morning.©Scheltema

Frosty winter morning. ©Scheltema

 

 

COBAW CAMPASPE BIOLINKS FIELD DAY A SUCCESS.

 

Ecologists and Landcare members planning the Cobaw Campaspe Field Day. The day gave participants an insight into the landscape and vegetation communities of the local region. It also provided a forum for the discussion of ecological restoration techniques and priorities and gave an indigenous perspective of the area.©Scheltema

Ecologists and Landcare members planning the Cobaw Campaspe Field Day. The day gave participants an insight into the landscape and vegetation communities of the local region. It also provided a forum for the discussion of ecological restoration techniques and priorities and gave an indigenous perspective of the area.  ©Scheltema

 

The Cobaw Campaspe Biolink Field Day was a great success with over 55 people attending. Participants toured the Campaspe River, Five Mile Creek, important remnant grassland sites, and ended the day overlooking the landscape at the top of the Jim Jims, near Hanging Rock.

People were delighted to hear  Taungurung Elder and knowledge holder, Uncle Larry Walsh, tell stories about local indigenous plants and animals and how they related to the lifestyle of Central Victoria oldest inhabitants. Expert wetland and grassland ecologists Damien Cook and Paul Foreman gave a wonderful insight into the ecological values of the area.

 

Woodend Landcare member Kate Daniel said "Participants learnt a lot from the speakers and added to their own understanding of plants,biodiversity and landscape connectivity.Judging by the chatter all day,people enjoyed the social atmosphere as well as exploring some hidden gems in the area.I particularly enjoyed walking through the Woodend Grasslands,a spot that looks pretty modest from the outside but is a really significant remnant site." ©Scheltema

Learning about the importance of remnant grasslands.Woodend Landcare member Kate Daniel said “Participants learnt a lot from the speakers and added to their own understanding of plants, biodiversity and landscape connectivity. I particularly enjoyed walking through the Woodend Grasslands, a spot that looks pretty modest from the outside but is a really significant remnant site.”   ©Scheltema

 

This was a great example of the UCLN following on from the goals of its Strategic Plan with four member groups working together to build ecological knowledge and skills.To read more about the day go to Explore The Landscape and Looking After The Land

 

Taungurung Elder Uncle Larry Walsh talks about the Landscape from anIndigenous perspective at Marshes COurt Ashbourne on the Cobaw Campaspe Field Day.©Scheltema

Taungurung Elder Uncle Larry Walsh talks about the Landscape from an Indigenous perspective at Marshes Court Ashbourne on the Cobaw Campaspe Field Day.  ©Scheltema

 

 

GORSE TASK FORCE FUNDING AVAILABLE

Have a problem with gorse? Why not investigate funding opportunities from the Gorse Task Force.©Scheltema

Have a problem with gorse? Why not investigate funding opportunities from the Gorse Task Force.  ©Scheltema

 

The Victorian Gorse Taskforce (VGT) with the support of the Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources is seeking project proposals from community-based organisations. In 2016/2017 the VGT will consider projects under a Small Grants Program, up to $5,000 (GST exclusive). It is interested in funding  community-led commitment to long term gorse control.

CLICK HERE to view application form and CLICK HERE  for the guidelines/eligibility to apply.

Applications open Monday 20 June 2016
Applications close Friday 12 August 2016

 

LANDCARE GROUPS UNITE TO PROTECT WATERWAYS.

 

 Trentham Landcare member Gael Elliott is seen here on the Coliban River."The rivers are the lifeblood of our environment and we need to nurture them.We need to respect the rivers and Landcare can act as a conduit in this process." said Gael.©Scheltema

Trentham Landcare member Gael Elliott is seen here on the Coliban River. “The rivers are the lifeblood of our environment and we need to nurture them.We need to respect the rivers and Landcare can act as a conduit in this process.” said Gael. ©Scheltema

 

Three Landcare Groups (Trentham,Tylden and Malmsbury) that form part of the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network have joined forces to help protect important waterways. The project, called Coliban Connections, is about working together in a strategic way to restore the landscape.

Said Project Leader Sophie Bickford “The rivers are of the utmost importance. They are a lifeline for many species and provide natural connectivity in the landscape. We want to start by learning more about the area and how to effectively restore it.”

A free Field Day including lunch, will be held on the 24th July with expert grassland and wetland ecologists, Damien Cook and Paul Foreman, to visit the Coliban River, Kangaroo Creek and the Little Coliban River.

 

 

Come along to the Coliban Connections Field and learn about the treasures within our environment ,such as this amanita xanthoaphala,seen near near Kangaroo Creek.©Scheltema

Come along to the Coliban Connections Field and learn about the treasures within our environment, such as this colorful mushroom amanita xanthocephala, seen near near Kangaroo Creek.       ©Scheltema

 

After the Field Day a desktop study will be produced.“The Upper Campaspe Landcare Network will produce a detailed report setting out findings and recommendations for a biolink connecting all three waterways. This will provide a basis for the three Landcare groups to be able to work together on a landscape size project.” said John Walters, President of the Malmsbury and District Landcare Group.

To read more about this day go to Rivers the Life Blood

Bookings can be made via Eventbrite bookings

 

Presidents of Malmsbury District and Trentham District Landcare Groups John Walters and Patricia Scheltus meet to discuss working together on the Coiban Connections Project ©Scheltema

Presidents of Malmsbury District and Trentham District Landcare Groups John Walters and Patricia Scheltus meet to discuss working together on the Coiban Connections Project. ©Scheltema

 

 

UCLN TO WORK WITH KYNETON SECONDARY COLLEGE STUDENTS.

An exciting new partnership is being formed with Environmental Science students from Kyneton Secondary College.The year 10 and 11 students will be working with the Campaspe River and Land Management Group on the Campaspe River in Kyneton and with the Friends of Bald Hill at the Bald Hill Reserve.

President of Friends of Bald Hill Carolyn Robb, said of the collaboration “The KSC Collaborative Environmental Project is a wonderful opportunity for the Environmental Science students and teachers to work with the Friends of Bald Hill Reserve who already work in close partnership with the MRSC Environmental team and the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network: all who have the common purpose and passion to preserve and enhance the rich ecological diversity at Bald Hill Reserve.”

 

Environmental Science students from Kyneton Secondary College will be working at Bald Hill with the Friends group to install and monitor nest boxes©Scheltema

Environmental Science students from Kyneton Secondary College will be working at Bald Hill Reserve with the Friends group to install and monitor nest boxes  for animals such as phascogales and sugar gliders.                                             ©Scheltema

The students will be involved in planting the threatened Hairy Anchor Plant along the banks of the Campaspe (with seed collected and propagated from the nearby Hairy Anchor nursery). One of the students from Kyneton Secondary College, 15 year old Estelle Winkerman, member of the Sustainability Group, said of the collaboration : “This is certainly an important thing to be involved in and support because we only have one earth, one environment and one chance to make it last. We have already negatively impacted the environment so if we continue on this path, we won’t be able to undo what we’ve done. It’s definitely important for youth and teenagers to think about their impact on the environment, we are the ones who have to live in the future.”

Peter Harding, President of the CRLMG said “The CR&LMG is always keen to engage with primary and high school students through their teaching staff to further the cause of restoring the Campaspe River to pre Crack Willow conditions. We urge all concerned members of our community to participate in our planting program either on Friday July 29 at 1pm for National Schools Tree Day or Sunday July 31 at 10am on National Tree day at the Campaspe River bank below Langley Street, Kyneton.”

National Tree Day is the country’s largest nature-care event and community tree planting event. Each year over 250,000 people and hundreds of environmental, community and youth organizations take part in Tree Day at over 3,000 sites across the country.

To register go to http://treeday.planetark.org/coords/.

To see a video of the CRLMG’s work in collaboration with NCCMA, staring Landcarers Don and Jessie Smith, who have worked tirelessly to protect the river for over 20 years, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggwxBqGjDUY

 

 

WEED AND RABBIT BUSTER WORKSHOPS.

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RABBIT BUSTER WORKSHOP 22ND OCTOBER 2016

Are rabbits a problem on your property? Want to know more about how to control them? You might be interested in a Rabbit Buster Workshop, to be held on Sunday 22nd October at Malmsbury, followed by a practical demonstration with a contractor on a property in Drummond.

WEED CONTROL WORKSHOP 3RD DECEMBER 2016

Or if you need to know more about how to control weeds,put aside the date of 3rd December for a Weed Control Workshop to be held at Bald Hill Reserve. Contractor Pat Radi Mansbridge will be on hand to answer any questions on equipment,weed control techniques,what spray to use for what weed etc.Biosecurity officer Martin Deering from the Department of Agriculture will also be on hand to offer advice.

More information on both workshops closer to the date.

Is gorse your problem?Why not investigate funding from the Gorse Task Force? ©Scheltema

Want to know about weeds and how to effectively deal with them? Come to the UCLN Weed Control Workshop on the 3rd December  ©Scheltema

WORKING WITH WEEDS GUIDE

The Weed’s Network has launched its Working with Weeds Guide, which aims to be a leading resource for learning about Bio-Holistic options for living with and working with weeds.  For more information go to:Weeds Network

 

THE WEEDS NEWS

To read the current Weed’s News Digest regarding current weed research go to: Weeds News

 

INVASIVE ANIMAL REPORTS: CITIZEN ACTION & INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS

Two reports have been released regarding institutional improvements to make it more feasible and attractive for citizens to take effective action on the management of invasive animals and plants. They are available at:

 

 

 NEW VICTORIAN MINISTER FOR ENVIRONMENT

In the recent cabinet reshuffle, Lily D’Ambrosio, the member for Mill Park, has taken on the new portfolio of Energy, Environment and Climate Change, with a focus on renewable energy, energy efficiency and combatting the effects of climate change. Ms D’Ambrosio has a background in the Community Development portfolio.  Lisa Neville is the new Minister for Police and remains Minister for Water.

 

©Scheltema

©Scheltema

 

COMMITTEES, RECRUITMENT AND SUCCESSION

Thanks to Susie  J Johnson from the FTLA for the  information below which you may find useful for your groups:

Many groups are coming up to their AGMs and considering recruiting new people with fresh ideas onto committees. Continuity is important in a committee but so is some change which brings new energy. Ideally each year, some experienced members should remain on the committee and some new ones join. This allows for a balance of experience and new ideas to guide the committee for the following year.

Your group should decide what works best for you. It is not ideal for one person to stay in the same position for more than three or four years because it can prevent the emergence of fresh ideas from new people and may also lead to the incumbent person suffering from ‘burn out’. However, there are key people whose knowledge and experience is invaluable that the group won’t want to lose: one solution is to rotate the positions, or to create mentor positions to allow new officers to access the wisdom of experienced committee members.

Need some ideas on revamping and refreshing your committee?

There are a number of resources around to help you – contact the FTLA for the latest Landcare Governance Kit, access the Community Sector Governance Capability Framework (See below), try a volunteer matching service such as Community Directors

or https://govolunteer.com.au or probono.

There is even a Mentor the Treasurer program: Mentor the Treasurer

 

COMMUNITY SECTOR GOVERNANCE CAPABILITY FRAMEWORK

The Community Sector Governance Capability Framework describes the broad capabilities required by people on Boards or Committees of Management in community sector organisations. It can assist Not for Profit organisations understand the knowledge and skills that are critical for the stewardship of an organisation, including the additional capabilities needed for the Office Bearer roles of Chair, Secretary and Treasurer. For more information go to: click here

 

A winter visitor to the woodpile. ©Scheltema

A winter visitor to the woodpile. ©Scheltema

FEATHER MAP PROJECT

The Feather Map of Australia project aims to collect waterbird feathers from wetlands around Australia. These feathers will be analysed using nuclear techniques, such as mass spectrometry and high resolution X-ray fluorescence, to identify stable isotopes and minerals that are incorporated into feathers through the ingestion of food.

These analyses will identify the differences in feathers from diverse parts of Australia, creating a Feather Map.This is a joint project of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and University of New South Wales (UNSW) and it’s so easy to get involved.

Visit the ANSTO website at: Feather Map Website  or search for Feather Map on social media.

 

GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

 

 

 NORMAN WETTENHALL SMALL ENVIRONMENTAL GRANT SCHEME

The Small Environmental Grant Scheme provides support for groups or individuals undertaking biodiversity conservation projects in Australia. Projects of up to $10,000 can be about one or more of the following: monitoring, recording and sharing data, delivering community education, providing community capacity building (training), research and science, or landscape restoration and education (Victoria only). Opening date: 28 June 2016 (the round will be closed when the maximum number of applications has been reached.)  For more information or to apply, visit: http://nwf.org.au/grants/small-environmental-grants/

 

 THE R. E. ROSS TRUST GRANTS – VIC

The grants work around 4 impact areas. For Landcare groups the most relevant area is impact area D; the protection and preservation of Australian Flora and Fauna. Organisations must first submit an expression of interest for consideration by the Trustees and May then be invited to submit a full application.  Applications are considered all year round. For more information go to:

http://www.rosstrust.org.au/grants/apply-for-a-grant/

 

©Scheltema

©Scheltema

CANON ENVIRONMENTAL GRANTS

Applications close on Friday 5 August 2016 Canon Oceania is now appealing for applicants for its annual environmental in-kind grants program. Grants are available to Australian and New Zealand schools, community groups and not-for-profit organisations making a positive impact on their environment and community. Recipients will be will be given their choice of $5,000 (retail value) of Canon equipment for use in their project. For more information go to : Canon Environmental Grants

 

 

2016-17 NORTH CENTRAL COMMUNITY GRANTS PROGRAM

application period will commence in early July.

 

NEED SOME IDEAS APPLYING FOR GRANTS? THE INFO BELOW MAY BE USEFUL TO YOUR GROUP

FRRR FUNDRAISING WEBINARS. FRRR has teamed up with Our Community to host three webinars specifically designed to help rural, regional and remote community groups access more funding. In a panel discussion format, these webinars aim to demystify some of the funding options beyond grants, and to share knowledge and practical tools to help you get started. • Planned Giving and Bequests 101 – 1pm AEST on Thursday, 14 July • Sponsorship 101 – 1pm AEST on Wednesday, 27 July • Crowd-funding 101 – 1pm AEST on Wednesday, 10 August Registrations for the webinars are now open at click here

 

TREK FOR AUSSIE FARMERS

Landcare Australia is searching for adventurers keen to join in the 2017 trek for Aussie Farmers on the east coast of Tasmania, February 25 to March 3. Explore Tasmania’s East Coast & Port Arthur, visit some of Australia’s founding farms and learn about their sustainable farming practices, and help raise valuable funds to help Landcare Australia support Aussie farmers. All the details are on the Landcare Australia website: click here

 

NORTH CENTRAL CMA CHAT

The July 2016 edition of the North Central Chat can be downloaded (CLICK HERE – 4MB), and includes:
* Update on the upcoming release of the 2016-17 Community Grants program
* Launch of the north central Victoria Soil Health Guide
* National Landcare Conference details and sponsorship opportunity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 2016

  •  COBAW TO CAMPASPE CONNECTIONS FIELD DAY.
  • TREES FOR MUM PLANTINGS BY WOODEND LANDCARE AND CAMPASPE RIVER AND LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP.
  • MESSAGE FROM THE ENVIRONMENT MINISTER.
  • NEWHAM LANDCARE PRESENTS A TALK ON GLIDER ECOLOGY BY KYLIE SOANE.
  • UTILIZE LODDON PRISON LANDMATE CREWS FOR FREE AS PART OF YOUR GRANT APPLICATIONS.
  • GRANT OPPORTUNITIES, NORTH CENTRAL CHAT.
  • RABBIT CONTROL VIDEO.
  • LANDCARE VICTORIA TURNS 30.
  • PROTECTING VICTORIA’S ENVIRONMENT-BIODIVERSITY 2036.

 

 

The President of Pipers Creek Landcare Peter Sporle looks out over the banks of the Campapse and wishes for rain©Scheltema

The President of Pipers Creek Landcare Peter Sporle looks out over the banks of the Campapse and wishes for rain. ©Scheltema

 

Welcome to our May edition of the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network ENews. After a long hot dry summer and a very dry autumn of beautiful colors it has finally rained! How lovely to hear the sound of rain on the roof and know that my dam has water running into it and the tanks are filling. I am sure all of you Landcarers out there,especially those about to embark on autumn plantings, will be very pleased with the rain also. Lets hope for more.

 

 

We have had an autumn of beautiful colors but not much rain until now! ©Scheltema

We have had an autumn of beautiful colors but not much rain until now. ©Scheltema

 

 

 

COBAW TO CAMPASPE CONNECTIONS FIELD DAY

Kate Daniel from Woodend Landcare and grsslands ecologist Paul Foreman planning the Cobaw tro Campaspe FIeld Day.©Scheltema

Kate Daniel from Woodend Landcare and grasslands ecologist Paul Foreman planning the Cobaw to Campaspe Field Day. ©Scheltema

The Network received a 2015/16 Community Grant called ‘UCLN Building Links to the Future:Action Planning Upper Campaspe region Biolink and Buffer Cluster Projects’. Ashbourne, Newham, Woodend and Carlsruhe Landcare groups have been working hard together to organise the Cobaw To Campaspe Connections Field Day. This is a great example of the Network following on with the goals outlining in the Strategic Plan and working together to preserve and protect our landscape. It promises to be a an informative day out, and it’s free, with lunch provided. If you are interested make sure you RSVP to landcaregrp.carlsruhe@gmail.com by the 18th May.

 

final UCLN A3 Field Day poster (1)_edited-1

 

 

Taungurung elder Uncle Larry Walsh, a wonderful storyteller, will be present to tell people the Taungurung stories within the landscape. Also present will be highly respected grassland and wetland ecologists Paul Foreman and Damian Cook.

Taungurung Elder Uncle Larry Walsh will be present on the Field Day on the 22nd May.©Scheltema

Taungurung Elder Uncle Larry Walsh will be present on the Field Day on the 22nd May. ©Scheltema

 

If you would like to read the story that appeared on the front page of the Midland Express this week about the day please go to  http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3896594/explore-the-landscape/

The UCLN will be running a similar field day on the COliban River later in the year as part of the 'Coliban Corridor' project©Scheltema

The UCLN will be running a similar field day on the Coliban River later in the year as part of the ‘Coliban Corridor’ project which involves Trentham, Tylden and Malmsbury Landcare Groups working together. ©Scheltema

 

 

TREES FOR MUM PLANTING DAYS BY WOODEND LANDCARE AND THE CAMPASPE RIVER AND LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP.

 

Landcaare group Presidents Krista Patterson-Majoor and Peter Harding,as well as Banjo and Daisy Ford discuss the Trees for Mum Planting days at the Kyneton River Walk©Scheltema

Landcare group Presidents Krista Patterson-Majoor and Peter Harding, as well as Banjo and Daisy Ford discuss the Trees for Mum Planting days at the Kyneton River Walk. ©Scheltema

Two groups within our Network, Woodend Landcare and the Campaspe River and Land Management Group, held successful planting days on Mother’s Day as part of the Trees For Mum project. The President of Woodend Landcare Krista Patterson-Majoor said -“Trees For Mum is a great opportunity to celebrate and contribute to the important parts of life -family,community and the planet.”

The Campaspe River and Land Management group planted out the rare and endangered Hairy Anchor Plant. President Peter Harding said “We propagate this special rare plant in our nursery near the river. We see this as a vital part of our overall program to help restore the river environs to as close to pre-settlement as possible.”

http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3885704/plant-a-tree-for-mum/

 

The Hairy Anchor Plant (Discaria pubescens) seen here in its nursery near the Campaspe River.Seed is carefully harvested using a stocking,plants are grown and planted along the Kyneton River Walk to help restore the river environs to as close to pre-settlement as possible©Scheltema

The Hairy Anchor Plant (Discaria pubescens) seen here in its nursery near the Campaspe River. Seed is carefully harvested using a stocking, and plants are grown and planted along the Kyneton River Walk to help restore the river environs to as close to pre-settlement as possible. ©Scheltema

 

MESSAGE FROM THE ENVIRONMENT MINISTER

The Environment Minister Lisa Neville recently conducted a review of  the Victorian Government support of Landcare. The Minister  said “The contribution Landcare makes towards protecting and improving Victoria’s environment, along with the improved productivity of farms and many social benefits is well recognised in Australia and around the world. Your continued involvement in this work is highly valued and appreciated”.  If you would like to read more see below –

Ministers update - Victorian Landcare Program Review (1)_resize

 

 

 

Environment Minister Lisa Neville with members of Upper Campaspe Landcare Network at a Newham Landcare project©Scheltema

Environment Minister Lisa Neville with members of Upper Campaspe Landcare Network at a Newham Landcare project. ©Scheltema

 

NEWHAM LANDCARE PRESENTS A TALK ON GLIDER ECOLOGY

 

Newham Landcare is presenting a talk on glider ecology by Kylie Soanes,a very entertaining and knowledgeable speaker.See details below.

 

gliders flier (1)

 

 

UTILIZE LANDMATE CREWS AS PART OF YOUR GRANT APPLICATIONS.

I advised groups in the last ENews of the availability of Loddon Prison Landmate crews for $400/day. They are efficient reliable workers and the groups that have utilized them within our Network have given good feedback. The good news is they can now work on Landcare projects for no cost. If interested please read  information below from a DEWLP Project Officer who is involved in the Landmate/DEWLP/Landcare partnership.If you would like to see your grants go further, for the same cost, read on!

How does a proponent include a labour component if the funding program only allows labour as  in-kind contribution?

Landcare groups and community environment groups with projects funded by grant programs that don’t fund labour or contractors can use Landmate crews as they are ‘no cost’ to DELWP funded projects.

Using Landmate crews will enable your group to extend the reach (activities you can deliver) of your project. How to include Landmate crews in projects will be written into all future grant guidelines.

To use Landmate crews you will need to:

1.  Discuss with Corrections Victoria about how you wish to use the crews;
2.  In your current project, contact Corrections Victoria Landmate contact to discuss how you wish to use the crew (type of work) and to what extent (how many days). If you are seeking the no cost option (subsidised through DELWP grant programs) you will need to supply your grant contract details to them in your application form (grant source, grant name, contract number, name of project, name of organisation)
3.  If a new project, include in your application to DELWP (or CMA) funding body about how you wish to use Landmate (type of work and how many days);
4.  Continue to your in-kind contributions to projects and let Landmate take your project further that is to deliver more activities or across a greater area.
5. Report back on the use of Landmate in your project reports.

If any groups are keen to pursue this further and need to contact Corrections Victoria Landmate please get in touch with me on uclandcare@gmail.com. Please think about this opportunity for free labour when you write your next grant application!

 

LANDCARE AUSTRALIA SPECIAL PROJECTS GRANTS 2016

Hurry -closes May 20th!

Landcare Australia is offering grants to Landcare and farming groups to undertake projects that protect environmental assets, address priority issues and improve the health of the environment.

Groups are invited to apply for a grant of up to $15,000 (ex. GST) to support projects that focus on one or more of the following areas:

  • Biodiversity and threatened species; and
  • Sustainable Agriculture.

For more information, login (or sign up if you’re not already a member) to theLandcare Australia Communities Portal and click on the ‘Grants’ tab.

Applications open on Monday 18 April and close on Friday 20 May (5.00pm EST).

NORMAN WETTENHALL SMALL ENVIRONMENTAL GRANT SCHEME

The Small Environmental Grant Scheme provides support for groups or individuals undertaking biodiversity conservation projects in Australia. Projects of up to $10,000 can be about one or more of the following: monitoring, recording and sharing data, delivering community education, providing community capacity building (training), research and science, or landscape restoration and education (Victoria only).

For more information or to apply, visit: http://nwf.org.au/grants/small-environmental-grants/

 

Help protect our precious native flora and fauna such as this blue tongue lizard by investigating a grant opportunity with your group.©Scheltema

Help protect our precious native flora and fauna such as this blue tongue lizard by investigating a grant opportunity with your group. ©Scheltema

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

The May 2016 edition of the North Central CMA publication ‘chat’ is now available (click here – 4.8 MB), and contains a range of stories about Landcare and Waterwatch from across the region.

 

 

ARE RABBITS A PROBLEM ON YOUR PROPERTY?WATCH THIS VIDEO

If you would like a cheap practical solution to rabbit control watch this very entertaining video! A lot of landholders have been commenting recently on the increases in numbers of Rabbits around their properties, and asking how to control them. Many of the techniques available need specialist contractors and equipment, but you can get started by yourself using Pindone oats with a bait station.

Connecting Country has kindly offered to share this Instructional Video with UCLN – #1: How to create and set up a Pindone Bait Station.

The Make a Rabbit Bait Station’ video is also available to view from Connecting Country on Vimeo.

Click here for more information available about the control of rabbits and other pests.

 

LANDCARE TURNS 30 -SHARE YOUR PHOTOS

Later this year, Landcare in Victoria will celebrate a major milestone – its 30th birthday! Landcare Victoria is asking Landcarers young and old to share their stories through photographs and videos.

To mark this special occasion they want to showcase the array of wonderful Landcare projects, events, achievements and the changes that have taken place over the last three decades. They are  looking for photos showing the progress of projects over time, milestones for your group/network, people participating in events, and more generally, what Landcare means to you.

We’ve made it easy for you to upload your photos, videos and consent forms via the following link 30 Years of Landcare Photo Upload

A Landcare volunteer and ecologist discuss Biolink plans on top of the Jim Jims ,near Newham.©Scheltema

A Landcare volunteer and ecologist discuss Biolink plans on top of the Jim Jims, near Newham.©Scheltema

 

PROTECTING VICTORIA’S ENVIRONMENT-BIODIVERSITY 2036

 

Some of you will have already made a submission to ‘Protecting Victoria’s Environment – Biodiversity 2036’.  But for those of you yet to do so, the deadline is this Sunday.  Numbers of submissions is one way the Minister, and the Cabinet, know how much interest there is in this issue.  This is one of the ways the urgent need for more funding and support will be recognised and hopefully delivered.

Through the on-line portal at http://haveyoursay.delwp.vic.gov.au/biodiversity-plan, you can work through the online consultation questions.  If you haven’t the time please at least send in a written submission from you and/or your organisation – go to “Make a Submission” then “upload a document”.  It won’t take long and is very important.

Have your say in helping ©Scheltema

Have your say in helping protect Victoria’s Environment by making a submission to ‘Protecting Victoria’s Environment -Biodiversity 2036’.
©Scheltema

February 2016

  • LANDCARE GROUPS EXPRESS CONCERN OVER REMNANT ROADSIDE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT
  • CREEPY CRAWLIES AT BALD HILL RESERVE
  • CAMPASPE VALLEY LANDCARE TACKLES WEEDS
  • COBAW CAMPASPE BIOLINK PROJECT BEGINS PLANNING PROCESS
  • WOODEND LANDCARE
  • LODDON PRISON LANDMATE PROJECT ASKING FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST
  • WOODEND SUSTAINABILITY FESTIVAL
  • GLIDER SYMPOSIUM
  • FEATHERED FIVE BIRD FESTIVAL
  • FUTURE FARM EXPO
  • MOTHS AT NEWHAM
  • WEED 101 WORKSHOP
  • GRANTS OPPORTUNITIES  -ONE TREE PER CHILD,FRRR SMALL GRANTS
  • CHEMICAL USERS WORKSHOP
  • FUTURE FARM EXPO
  • MRSC DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY OPEN FOR COMMENT
  • NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

 

Summer rainbow over the Wombat Forest. ©Scheltema

Summer rainbow over the Wombat State Forest. ©Scheltema

Welcome to the February edition of our ENews.The feel of autumn is in the air and many of you will soon be planning planting days, hopefully with the help of some rain.

At a recent visit to listen to Landcare groups concerns regarding the management of remnant roadside vegetation, the Federal Member for Bendigo Lisa Chesters said “Since its inception the Landcare movement has made a profoundly important contribution to the well being of Central Victoria’s environment.”

As I continue to get an understanding of the work your groups do, I can certainly see that this is true, so congratulations to all of you who work so hard to help create a healthier local environment.

 

LANDCARE GROUPS EXPRESS CONCERN OVER REMNANT ROADSIDE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT.

 

Ecologist Karl Just explains to Federal Member for Bendigo Lisa Chesters,Landcare Member Alice Aird,and State member for Macedon Mary-Anne Thomas how areas of remnant roadside vegetation in the Newham area contain endangered vegetation communities and threatened species,some of which are protected under Federal Legislation.Landcare groups are concerned that it is not receiving adequate protection.©Scheltema

Ecologist Karl Just explains to Federal Member for Bendigo Lisa Chesters, Landcare Member Alice Aird, and State member for Macedon Mary-Anne Thomas how areas of remnant roadside vegetation in the Newham area contain endangered vegetation communities and threatened species, some of which are protected under Federal Legislation.Landcare groups are concerned that it is not receiving adequate protection.©Scheltema

 

Newham Landcare recently invited the Federal Member for Bendigo Lisa Chester and the State Member for Macedon Mary Anne Thomas to view remnant roadside vegetation in the region and listen to their concerns regarding its management.They were joined by Woodend and Ashbourne Landcare and other Environmental groups operating in the Macedon Ranges.

In 2015 Newham Landcare spent $10 000 conducting flora surveys along 20 kms of significant roadside. Consultant ecologist Karl Just, who conducted the survey said    “Roadsides often contain some of the last refuges for flora and fauna. They can serve as vital habitat links that enable flora and fauna to move across otherwise cleared landscapes. The Newham area contains some outstanding roadside remnants. These areas urgently require greater recognition, protection and management as they are major repositories for our local biodiversity.”

After viewing the area and listening to the Landcare members concerns MP Lisa Chesters said “Our native roads sides are a vital bio link and refuge for many endangered and rare native vegetation.  I would like to congratulate the hard work and commitment of the Newham Landcare members who are actively working to ensure these spaces are restored and protected. Since its inception the Landcare movement has made a profoundly important contribution to the wellbeing of Central Victoria’s environment.”

“I recognize the crucial role that our local Landcare groups play in the environmental health of our Macedon Ranges Roadsides and I am committed to supporting their work. I call on the Macedon Ranges Shire Council to do the same.”

The Landcare groups are calling for better protection of the remnant roadside vegetation. The area holds important remnants of rare plant communities such as the Alpine Shaggy Pea and some protected under Federal Legislation such as the Flax Lily, as well as  threatened animal species.

The Landcare groups are concerned that inappropriate mowing, slashing, weeds, dumping of waste material and planting exotics are destroying these ecological assets.

The President of Ashbourne Landcare Robin Allen said “I was delighted to hear MP Mary-Anne Thomas’s comments stating that she would ask MRSC to consult with Landcare groups on the conservation value of roadside vegetation prior to contractors conducting any work.”

The  groups are calling for the completion and endorsement of the Macedon Ranges Roadside Management Strategy for council managed roads, with specific actions to protect high and medium quality roadside remnant vegetation from further damage from contractors and landowners.

http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3707441/vital-habitat-links-need-protection-say-landcarers/

 

 

 

 

CREEPY CRAWLIES AT BALD HILL

 

 

Austin and Oliver May learn about Southern Banjo Frogs at the Creepy Crawly Walk and Talk at Bald Hill Reserve ©Scheltema

Austin and Oliver May learn about Southern Banjo Frogs (poddlebonks) at the Creepy Crawly Walk and Talk at Bald Hill Reserve ©Scheltema

 

 

The Friends of Bald Hill Reserve recently hosted a Creepy Crawlies Walk and Talk at the Bald Hill Reserve.

Wild Action presenter, and a Friends of Bald Hill member, Daniel Hunt, gave an entertaining presentation on the reptiles, amphibians and insects that live at the reserve. Accompanied by Limpy the blotched blue tongue Lizard, Sally the python, Bob the southern banjo frog, and Lizzie the eastern blue tongue lizard, participants learnt about the reptiles, amphibians and insects that live within the Bald Hill Reserve.

Daniel grew up nearby Bald Hill and spent his childhood years exploring the reserve. “As a kid I ventured all over Bald Hill looking for creepy crawlies. It’s a special place that needs to be conserved for the next generation to enjoy as well. Bald Hill has some unique species and ecosystems found nowhere else in the world. To this day we are still discovering new animals that live here such as the Bougainville Skink and the Endangered Brown toadlet, which is really exciting!”

“It’s great for children to get outdoors and engage with these amazing creatures that live so close to them. It’s important not only for the young but the old to get an understanding of the importance of a place like Bald Hill as species and ecosystems vanish all over the world. After all its biodiversity that keeps us all alive.” said Daniel.

After the walk participants walked to the top of Bald Hill searching for creepy crawlies. Scorpions, spiders, centipedes and beetles were discovered in their hiding spots, a wallaby was spotted up close, and a beautiful flowering Magenta’s Stork’s-Bill seen nestling in some rock formations.

President of the Friends Of Bald Hill, Carolyn Robb said “All of us, children and adults, went home with a number of new facts learnt about our local creepy crawlies, and the knowledge that there are many more creepy crawlies yet to be discovered and identified in our unique and very significant Reserve. It is also a reminder that we all need to continue to protect this beautiful place in order to preserve its flora, fauna and history. ”

 

Looking for scorpians at the Creepy Crawly Walk and Talk at Bald Hill Reserve.©Scheltema

Looking for scorpians at the Creepy Crawly Walk and Talk at Bald Hill Reserve.©Scheltema

 

 

 

CAMPASPE VALLEY LANDCARE GROUP TACKLES WEEDS.

 

Jan Elder and barbara James from Campaspe Valley Landcare have been hard at working producing a booklet which aims to educate landowners on how to identify and eradicate texas needle grass.©Scheltema

Jan Elder and Barbara James from Campaspe Valley Landcare have been hard at work producing a booklet which aims to educate landowners on how to identify and eradicate texas needle grass.They are seen here at a trial site to control the weed near Baynton.©Scheltema

 

The Campaspe Valley Landcare Group has been hard at work producing a booklet titled “A Ute Guide to:  Chilean and Texas Needle Grass.  Identification and Management”. It will be out  soon and will be a fantastic resource for landowners who want to learn how to identify and manage the weed which is fast becoming a problem in our area. If anyone would like one of these guides please contact me on uclandcare@gmail.com.
Barbara and Jan from Campaspe Valley Landcare have also successfully stopped a gorse infestation and seed bank from spreading onto neighbouring properties by alerting DELWP to the problem. DELWP then applied for money under the Good Neighbourhood Program to address the infestation. They are also involved in gorse control on members properties and roadsides.
Jan Elder and Barbara James from Campaspe Valley Landcare successfully controlled and stopped the spread of a large infestation of gorse along ?creek through the Good Neighbourhood Program at DELWP©Scheltema

Jan Elder and Barbara James from Campaspe Valley Landcare successfully controlled and stopped the spread of a large infestation of gorse along Back creek through the Good Neighbourhood Program at DELWP ©Scheltema

COBAW CAMPASPE BIOLINK PROJECT BEGINS PLANNING

Rare, threatened and vulnerable species such as the Powerful Owl, seen here, are some of the flora and fauna the Cobaw Campaspe Biolink Project will be aiming to identify and develop measures to protect. The work is being undertaken by the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network in conjunction with Ashbourne, Woodend, Carlsruhe and Newham Landcare Groups .©Scheltema

Rare, threatened and vulnerable species such as the Powerful Owl, seen here, are some of the flora and fauna the Cobaw Campaspe Biolink Project will be aiming
to identify and develop measures to protect. The work is being undertaken by the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network in conjunction with Ashbourne, Woodend,
Carlsruhe and Newham Landcare Groups .©Scheltema

The Upper Campaspe Landcare Network recently received a grant to assist in developing long term Action Plans for Landscape restoration along two natural corridors. One of them – the Cobaw Campaspe Biolink Project – involves Woodend, Ashbourne, Carlsruhe and Newham Landcare Groups.
A desktop study is currently being compiled identifying assets and features along the corridors. The study will also identify any conservation and land use issues and threats to the landscape.Workshops in the field are planned, open to landowners, Landcare members and interested stakeholders. They will include walk and talk events with ecologists and indigenous owners looking at issues such as threatened species, river and grassland restoration and remnant vegetation management.
The workshops will be seeking input and feedback from participants which will then be incorporated into the project action plans. This information will help Landcare groups and landowners set long term objectives regarding protecting our precious environment.
I will keep you notified of the workshops as plans progress.
This map shows the approximate area of the Cobaw Campaspe Biolink Project.

This map shows the approximate area of the Cobaw Campaspe Biolink Project.

WOODEND LANDCARE

 

 

The new President of Woodend Landcare Krista Patterson - Majoor seen here with former President Peter Yates examining some plantings along Five Mile Creek.©Scheltema

The new President of Woodend Landcare Krista Patterson-Majoor seen here with former President Peter Yates examining some plantings along Five Mile Creek Woodend.©Scheltema

The Woodend Group is continuing with their planting of indigenous vegetation along 5 mile creek and at the Woodend Children’s Park, and undertaking ongoing follow up weed control, as well as conducting a “willow attack” at Tennyson St Weir. They have a planting day organised for  Mother’s day, and will be promoting their group at the Woodend  Sustainability Festival.
Taking a break after helping out at a working bee to control weeds©Scheltema

Taking a break after helping out at a working bee to control weeds. ©Scheltema

 

 

LODDON PRISON LANDMATE PROJECT

Would your group benefit from having a Landmate Crew work in your area?

Supervised,qualified and experienced teams of 8 to 10 prisoners are available for $400.00 day.

We have had good feedback about the work that has been done by these teams within our Network.

If you are interested please let me know before the 3rd March .uclandcare@gmail.com
Landmate Information-1

 

 WOODEND SUSTAINABILITY FESTIVAL  SATURDAY 27TH FEBRUARY

 

UCLN, Woodend, Newham, Ashbourne and the Campaspe River and Land Management Group will be on  display at the Macedon Ranges Sustainability Festival at the Woodend Community Garden and Hub site. The festival runs from 10 am till 4 pm on Saturday the 27th February. Please come along to check out our local biolink plans and learn about what Landcare and other environmental groups in our region are doing. There will also be forums on Nature and Climate Change, Sustainable Food and Mobilising Communities for Change.

More info at: http://slf.mrsgonline.org.au/

 

 

 

GLIDER SYMPOSIUM SEYMOUR 18TH MARCH

 

glider

Glideways Symposium Flier (2)

 

 

 

 

 FEATHERED FIVE BIRD FESTIVAL 19TH – 20 MARCH

COme and learn about the Feathered Five,such as this Diamond Firetail ,at the Feathered Five Festival on March 19-20th. Pic Geoff Parks

Come and learn about the Feathered Five, such as this Diamond Firetail, at the Feathered Five Festival on March 19-20th. Pic Geoff Parks

 

Connecting Country is holding its  inaugural Feathered Five Festival. It is a celebration of woodland birds and their habitat with two days of birdwatching, activities and talks over the weekend of 19-20 March.  There is also a  free Saturday Evening Forum on the 19th of March in Campbells Creek.See poster below for more info.

More information about the festival is available at: http://connectingcountry.org.au/featheredfivefestival/ or call Connecting Country on 5472 1594.

 

 

 

 

Feathered Five Festival Poster 2016

 

 

 

 

 

MOTHS MARCH 18TH

 

 

 

moths flyer (1)-1

 

 

 

WEED WORKSHOP MARCH 5TH NEWHAM

 

 

Weed flyer

 

 

 

 

 

FOUNDATION FOR RURAL AND REGIONAL RENEWAL SMALL GRANTS

 

The Small Grants for Rural Communities is the longest running and broadest program Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal offers, opening twice per year.

Grants of up to $5,000 are available for projects and activities that offer clear public benefit for communities in rural, regional or remote Australia. Priority is given to communities of 10,000 or fewer.

Applicants must be not-for-profit community organisations with an ABN or incorporation certificate.

For more information visit: http://www.frrr.org.au/grants/small-grants-for-rural-communities-round29

Round 29 is now open and applications close 5pm Thursday 24th March 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

ONE TREE PER CHILD FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

 

One Tree Per Child is part of the Australian Governments 20 Million Tree Program©Scheltema

One Tree Per Child is part of the Australian Government’s 20 Million Tree Program. ©Scheltema

 

 

The One Tree Per Child program is an opportunity for Landcare groups/networks and Councils to receive funds ($2.50 per tree/shrub) for planting projects this coming planting season. The funding for the program is from the Australian Government’s 20 Million Trees program.

Who can apply: the guidelines and application form only mention councils as possible applicants. However, applications are also welcome from Landcare groups/networks and any other organisations that can deliver planting projects this planting season.

Applications close: there is no closing date, but One Tree Per Child would like applications to be submitted very soon, or at least to have had some firm discussions in the next couple of weeks about projects that can be undertaken this planting season.

Where: projects can be across more than one site. Note – each planting site must be at least 0.2 hectares.

Plant species: tree/shrub species that reach two (2) metres at maturity. Note – projects of 4,000+ plants will be prioritised.

When: projects that can proceed this winter planting season.

Who: where possible, projects will involve local primary school children in the planting activity. Alternatively, schools could deliver curriculum activities at a planting site, or there could be an “open” invitation to the community to participate in a planting.

Funding: $2.50 (ex GST) per tree/shrub.

Project outcomes: projects that improve the extent, condition and connectivity of indigenous vegetation by planting tree and shrubs .

More information: contact Siobhan Lapthorne, Campaign Administrator, One Tree Per Child, via email: admin@onetreeperchild.com or mob: 0420 403 677 or go to http://www.onetreeperchild.com/#about

 

 

 

CHEMICAL USERS COURSE 15TH MARCH

 

unnamed (4)

 

 

THE FUTURE FARM EXPO 2016

 

Thursday 14 April (10.00am-5.00pm)

North Central Catchment Management Authority (CMA) in conjunction with the Swan Hill Rural City Council is pleased to organise and host a regional Future Farming Expo on Thursday 14 of April at the Swan Hill Town Hall.  The all-day event will feature renowned guest speakers, site visits, a networking lunch and workshops on a variety of topics. Attendees will hear about farming succession,  farming in a variable climate, farm insurance, breaking into new Chinese markets, Free Trade Agreements and much more. Full program details will be on North Central CMA website shortly for this innovative free event.

Early registrations are open now, please contact North Central CMA on (03) 5448 7124.

 

 

MACEDON RANGES SHIRE COUNCIL DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY OPEN FOR COMMENT

The draft environment strategy will guide how Council and the community can work together to protect and enhance the Macedon Ranges and there are a number of ways you can have your say until Thursday 24 March.

It provides high level guidance to Council for improving environmental outcomes across its range of activities, and for working with the community towards a better environmental future.

It sets objectives, policy statements, and high level actions for the key themes of climate change, biodiversity, catchment management, and resource efficiency.

Following the close of the exhibition period on 24 March, the draft strategy will be updated to a final version, accounting for community feedback and discussions. The final strategy will be presented to Council for adoption in June 2016.

Your input and time is greatly appreciated and we look forward to your feedback.

YOU CAN HAVE YOUR SAY  BY GOING TO THIS LINK

 

 

 

 

MARCH EDITION OF NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

The March edition of the North Central Chat is out now: click here

This month features some exciting Waterwatch program updates and articles from local Landcare groups doing wonderful work within their local communities.

If you have an article to submit in the monthly newsletter NCCMA would  love to hear from you, contact the Landcare team via landcare@nccma.vic.gov.au

 

 

DECEMBER 2015

In This Edition:

  • INDIGENOUS LANDSCAPE WORKSHOP
  • TRENTHAM LANDCARE BEGINS WILLOW REMOVAL AT HISTORIC ENDERS BRIDGE
  • NEW HOMES FOR PHASCOGALES
  • UCLN SUCCESSFUL IN  NETWORK GRANT APPLICATION AND GORSE TASK FORCE GRANT
  • DROUGHT RELIEF PACKAGES
  • LANDCARE INFORMATION NOTES AVAILABLE
  • UCLN AGM
  • COBAW FIRE INQUIRY
  • UCLN PART OF WINNING TEAM
  • NORTH CENTRAL CHAT
  • 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF LANDCARE
  • NEW SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE STRATEGY FOR NORTH CENTRAL NOW OUT
  • COMMUNITIES FOR NATURE,WORK FOR THE DOLE AND TYLDEN LANDCARE
  • LANDLINK

 

 

DSC_8945_resize

 

 

 

INDIGENOUS LANDSCAPE WORKSHOP AT TRENTHAM FALLS.

 

Several Trentham Landcare members recently attended  an interesting walk at Trentham Falls to learnabout the history and  geology of the area through indigenous eyes.Dja Dja Wurrung Elder Ricky Nelson performed a welcome to Country above the Falls.©Scheltema

Trentham Landcare members recently attended an interesting walk at Trentham Falls to learn about the history and geology of the area through indigenous eyes.Dja Dja Wurrung Elder Ricky Nelson performed a welcome to Country above the Falls.                                                       ©Scheltema

 

 

Members from Trentham Landcare, the Trentham Historical Society and Wombat Forest Care met recently at Trentham Falls for a workshop to learn about the natural and cultural history of the area.

An elder of the DJa Dja Wurrung people, Ricky Nelson, performed a Welcome to Country dance s on top of the Falls. He explained how in his culture it was good manners to ask for permission to enter other people’s land, who would in turn grant permission to pass through and gather food as needed.

Aunty Julie McHale, though not a Dja Dja Wurrung women as she is originally from Tasmania, explained how she had been adopted as an elder in this region. She told Dreamtime stories and spoke of how the indigenous plants were used. Participants were taught how to identify “ring” trees which are “markers” formed from eucalyptus branches trained as saplings to fuse into a ring formation pointing to significant sites such as water, birthing and burial trees. Birthing trees were identified.

The participants learnt that Trentham was on the edge of several indigenous communities and was a popular meeting place.

Geologist Dr Julian Hollis spoke of the complex geological history of the area and explained how the Falls will change in the future.

Following the walk, participants feasted on a lunch utilizing native foods produced by a  catering group – the “Murnong Mammas” who are either aboriginal women or mothers of aboriginal children.

Uncle Rick then gave a presentation about the history of the Dja Dja Wurrung and the process of formally identifying, documenting and preserving indigenous artefacts.

He summed up the day simply with the words, “Respect – Respect for oneself, the environment and others.”

 

 

TRENTHAM LANDCARE BEGINS WILLOW REMOVAL AT HISTORIC ENDERS BRIDGE

 

Work begins to remove willows at Enders Bridge,near Trentham Falls.©Scheltema

Work begins to remove willows at Enders Bridge,near Trentham Falls.                                                                                         ©Scheltema

 

Trentham Landcare was delighted to see willow removal begin along the Coliban River at the historic Enders Bridge near Trentham. The group applied for a Hepburn Community Grant of $7500.00 to begin removal of the willows at Enders Bridge, just upstream of Trentham Falls.

 

Crack willows are a weed occupying thousands of kilometers of streams across south eastern Australia. They can cause substantial social, economic and environmental impacts. Willows can reduce the quality and flow of water, causing damage to nearby infrastructure, and reducing habitat for native fauna.

 

Michael Keaney, from Trentham Landcare said “We noticed in the five years we had lived here that the willows had taken over. We wanted to remove them to improve the flow of the water, and expose native trees and grasses. We also wanted to give easier access to the historic Enders Bridge, and the dam and fort beyond it. The nearby Alexanders Paddock, which was cleared as a previous Landcare project, was used as camping and watering area in the days of the horse and cart. Enders Bridge was built in 1901-02 to replace the adjacent toll bridge which was built in 1869.”

 

President of Trentham Landcare Patricia Scheltus said “This will reduce the chance of willows growing downstream close to the Trentham Falls. This was a great exercise in the involvement in a number of different parties. Trentham Landcare initiated the idea and then involved Hepburn Shire, NCCMA, Vic Rds, DELWP, and local contractor Platypus Environmental Services.

“We are hoping to reestablish native fauna like platypus. Our vision is to create a lovely walking track along the Coliban River towards the Trentham Falls. We are talking to DELWP about a possible partnership with the Dja DJa Wurrung people to do ongoing maintenance.

 

Angela Gladman, project Manager with NCCMA, helped coordinate further willow and blackberry removal downstream of the work done by Trentham Landcare. Angela said “The North Central CMA is building on the great work of Trentham Landcare at Enders Bridge through funding the continuation of weed removal works for a further 1 km along the Coliban River towards Trentham Falls. Funded through the Victorian Governments North Central Priority Waterways Project, the work aims to reduce the downstream spread of invasive willow fragments and other weed seed from impacting upon the Trentham Falls. The Falls are significant for their environmental, geological and social values.

Michael Keaney and President of Trentham Landcare Patricia Scheltus at ENders Bridge where willow removal has begun.©Scheltema

Michael Keaney and President of Trentham Landcare Patricia Scheltus at Enders Bridge where willow removal has begun.                                                                                    ©Scheltema

 

NEW HOME FOR PHASCOGALES AT HANGING ROCK

 

 

Nestboxes for phascogales being installed at Hanging Rock Reserve.©Scheltema

Nest boxes for phascogales being installed at Hanging Rock Reserve.                                                                      ©Scheltema

 

 

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A joint effort by Newham  Landcare,Braemar College Year Nine students,Woodend Men’s Shed and Macedon Ranges Shire Council was undertaken recently with the aim of increasing and monitoring numbers of Brush-tailed  Phascogales at the Hanging Rock Reserve.

Phascogales,which are listed as vulnerable,need hollow bearing trees to nest.If there aren’t enough hollow bearing trees due to clearing,firewood collection  or logging,the nest boxes can provide an alternative  home.

Phascogales are a close relative to the Tasmanian Devil and they are under pressure due to a loss of habitat. They are already extinct in South Australia.
The Brush tailed Phascogale lives an interesting life. Males die during their first year of life after an intense breeding season. Females live another 3 to 4 years and give birth to as many as ten young that they carry around on their backs.

Year nine Braemar Students are taking part in the project.  Student Bea Bragaglia said “I think people need to become more aware of how many animals are becoming extinct and what we can do to stop that.We need to help keep the natural environment safe for them.”

 

Newham and district Landcare  member Marinda Brooks ,who was helping to install the boxes today said “Its the first time nest boxes for phascogales have been installed at Hanging Rock.It’s such a beautiful area and we need to make sure we are doing everything we can to protect the local fauna.”

Macedon Ranges Shire Council’s Environmental Officer William Terry, who supervised the installation of the nest boxes said “Council is really dedicated to providing opportunities for phascogales to flourish in our reserves.These nest boxes will help us survey and detect phascogales and work to conserve the population.”

The President of Newham and District Landcare Penny Roberts said “We are absolutely delighted that the program is going ahead.It’s been on our wish list for a long time.We hope that many people will take up the opportunity to come along on annual monitor days.”

http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3481485/phascogales-under-pressure/?cs=1479

Installing nest boxes at Hanging Rock Reserve.©Scheltema

Installing nest boxes at Hanging Rock Reserve.                                            ©Scheltema

 

UCLN SUCCESSFUL IN NETWORK GRANT APPLICATION

 

Sophie Bickford and Kate Daniel begin planning on the COliban River after hearing news of the Networks success in their grant application.©Scheltema

Sophie Bickford and Kate Daniel begin planning on the Coliban River after hearing news of the Network’s success in their grant application.                                                          ©Scheltema

 

The Upper Campaspe Landcare Network was thrilled to receive news that they were successful in their application for a Landcare Network Grant of $14,500.00 to continue implementing the goals of their Strategic Plan.

Sophie Bickford from the Network said “This project is really exciting as it shows that people are serious about tackling the threats faced by local species and are coming together to take a landscape-wide and informed approach to doing so. Working together in a targeted and strategic way we can achieve so much more.”

The money will be spent on achieving greater ecological outcomes in two areas – “the Upper Coliban Corridor” (from Trentham Falls to Malmsbury Reservoir) and the “Cobaw–Eastern Buffer”.

Seven Landcare groups (Malmsbury, Tylden, Trentham, Ashbourne, Newham, Woodend and Carlsruhe) within the UCLN will work together to hold a series of workshops that collate expert ecological and community knowledge in each area. Walks held along the rivers will identify and document existing values, threats and conservation opportunities to address problems.

The workshops will be led by ecologists and local indigenous representatives. They will be supported with mapping and other information on conservation and land-use issues.

Kate Daniel, President of Woodend Landcare said, “We’re looking forward to working with our Landcare neighbours Newham and Carlsruhe at the eastern edge of the Network. One of our aims is to better identify gaps in biolinks and develop some plans for future on-ground works.”

The member for Macedon Mary-Anne Thomas MP said, “The Andrews Government recognises the critical role played by Landcare groups and volunteers in the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network in achieving ongoing environmental gains in the region.”

“The $2 million 2015–2016 Victorian Landcare Grants are a key means of support for those groups and individuals, both in the electorate of Macedon and across the state.”

“We understand the valuable contribution Landcare groups play to our local communities and we are currently reviewing what else we can do to ensure we support volunteers and groups across Victoria.”

GORSE FUNDING

Our Network has also been successful in a $5000.Gorse Task Force Grant to undertake weed removal post fires in the Black Hill area.

 

 

 

 

 

Sophie and Marigold Bickford,Kate Daniels and Barry Elliot on the Coliban River begin planning after news of the Network's success in obtaining a grant. ©Scheltema

Sophie and Marigold Bickford,Kate Daniels and Barry Elliot on the Coliban River begin planning after news of the Network’s success in obtaining a grant.                                                  ©Scheltema

 

 

NORTH CENTRAL DROUGHT RESPONSE PACKAGE ANNOUNCED – FUNDING FOR STOCK CONTAINMENT AREAS IN OUR REGION

 

The North Central CMA is rolling out two parts of the State Government’s broader drought package — the Drought Employment Program and funding for Stock Containment Areas.

The Drought Employment Program aims to provide drought-affected people the opportunity to earn off-farm income to support their families and rural communities, contribute towards natural resource management outcomes and increase their confidence and skills for the future.

The employment program is restricted to the worst affected parts of the catchment(focusing on the population centres of Donald, Charlton, Wedderburn and St Arnaud), which means that farmers in our region and immediate surrounds are not currently eligible.

The funding for Stock Containment Areas however, is open to farmers across the catchment. The funding is to help manage livestock in a confined area. Eligible farmers will be provided with a grant of up to $2,000 to assist with establishing a stock containment area (SCA) on their properties.

Stock containment funding is also available to help manage livestock in a contained area. Containing stock makes it easier and faster for farmers to hand feed and monitor stock health, helps control erosion by protecting what little grass there is, and allows for pasture regrowth when the drought breaks.

 

More information can be found at the North Central CMA website: http://www.nccma.vic.gov.au/Land/Drought_Response/index.aspx

 

An article in the Age re water restrictions in our area — http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/-glch3d.html

 

 

Need help with information about how to run a Landcare Group? See link to useful notes below.©Scheltema

Need help with information about how to run a Landcare Group? See link to useful notes below.                                                       ©Scheltema

LANDCARE INFORMATION NOTES AVAILABLE

 

 

 

Have you ever wondered what the position description of a Secretary or President is? Or how to get your groups message across to a new audience? What about the best way to resolve a conflict or avoid burnt out?

If your group needs some help regarding planning,financial management,project management  and many other things there are a set of notes  available for download on the Victorian Landcare Gateway website at http://www.landcarevic.net.au/resources/for-groups/notes.

The series of ‘Landcare Notes’ produced by the Victorian Landcare team are very helpful. Some of them are particularly suited to helping new committee members find their feet, and some of them might offer new ideas on long-term issues.

 

The notes cover the topics of:

 

  1. Group Formation and Function
  2. Planning
  3. Funding
  4. Financial Management
  5. Project Management
  6. Communications and Public Relations
  7. Governance
  8. Human Resources
  9. Volunteering
  10. Employment

 

INVASIVE PLANT AND ANIMAL STORIES WANTED.

Would you like to tell the story of how your group has tackled the issue of weeds and feral animals?

The next issue (no. 66, autumn 2016 ) of the Victorian Landcare and Catchment Management magazine will feature stories on invasive plants and animals.

The editors are interested in hearing the experiences of groups, networks and landholders working on these challenging issues. Contributions should be sent to the editor (Carrie Tiffany, viaeditorviclandcare@gmail.com) by Friday 5 February 2016.

A two-page feature in the Victorian Landcare and Catchment Management magazine is around 1,000 words, plus 3-4 high res jpgs images. A one-page story is around 500 words with 1-2 high res jpgs images. A high res jpg is an electronic image at least 15cm in size when saved at 300dpi (this makes a file size of around 1MB). All photographs must be captioned. Photographs are not credited due to lack of space. Shorter stories and notices about upcoming events are also welcome. Stories written in the active voice with quotes (e.g. from landholders) are preferred.

If you would like some help writing the story or taking the photos please do not hesitate to ask me.

 

 

 

UCLN AGM HELD AT KYNETON

 

 

 

Peter McRostie from  NCCMA explains how to upload data and map projects into a tablet whilst on site at the UCLN AGM.©Scheltema

Peter McRostie from NCCMA explains how to upload data and map projects into a tablet whilst on site at the UCLN AGM                                                    ©Scheltema

 

 

Our AGM was held recently at Kyneton. 27 people attended for a  walk along the Kyneton River  through the Botanic Gardens to look at the great work being done by the Campaspe Land and River Management Group.

Peter McRostie from the NCCMA brought along tablets and gave instructions on how to map projects and enter data on site. We then walked on to the Piper St Food Company for lunch ,the AGM and to see a the mapping projected.

The Network has applied via the volunteers Grant for 5 tablets to share amongst the groups and to start teaching members how to map their projects and enter data.This will make end of financial year data collection a less painful process! We hope we are successful in our grant application so we can begin work on this project.

 

 

Walking along the Campaspe River at the Kyneton Botanic Gardens prior to  the UCLN AGM©Scheltema

Walking along the Campaspe River at the Kyneton Botanic Gardens prior to the UCLN AGM            ©Scheltema

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COBAW FIRES INQUIRY RESULTS.

 

Landowner Hamish Anderson talks to FIre Recovery Officer from MRSC on is porperty after the recent CObaw-Lancefield Fires.©Scheltema

Landowner Hamish Anderson talks to Fire Recovery Officer from MRSC on his property after the recent Cobaw-Lancefield Fires.                                                          ©Scheltema

The recent Cobaw fires affected some landowners in the North East of our Network.

For those of you interested in  the report from the Lancefield-Cobaw fire investigation and the government’s response  go to – http://delwp.vic.gov.au/fire-and-emergencies/lancefield.

 

The issue

The Croziers Track planned burn conducted by DELWP broke containment lines on 3 October.

It was brought under control by DELWP and CFA firefighters over the next two days but again broke containment lines on 6 October.

On 8 October, Minister for Environment and Climate Change Lisa Neville requested an independent investigation into the fire; and for findings to be provided to DELWP within three to four weeks.

Investigation

The investigation was led by an external, independent expert, Murray Carter, Director of Western Australia’s Office of Bushfire Risk Management, and examined all aspects of the planned burn and what happened once it began.

Profile – Murray Carter – Director Office of Bushfire Risk Management, Western Australia

Scope of investigation

The investigation investigated and provided a written report to the Secretary regarding :

  1. the adequacy of planning and resourcing of the ‘Lancefield – Cobaw Croziers Track’ planned burn (the planned burn)
  2. the appropriateness of the weather and other conditions for conduct of the planned burn on 30 September 2015
  3. what caused the planned burn to break containment lines on 3 October 2015 and on 6 October 2015
  4. decision making, management and control of the planned burn, including the adequacy of the patrol strategy adopted following its ignition
  5. the adequacy of communication with the community in the lead up to the planned burn and after it broke containment lines

The investigation team extensively consulted with the community, from community meetings, one-on-one meetings, and feedback provided via email. More than 100 submissions were received from the community and stakeholders as part of the investigation.

Full terms of reference for the investigation:

Terms of Reference [PDF File – 67.2 KB]

Terms of Reference [MS Word Document – 17.1 KB]

Support and assistance

The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning will provide appropriate support to those members of the community that have suffered damage as a result of this fire.

If you require any support or assistance from the government, please contact DELWP’s Community Liaison Officer on 5336 6674.

For more information about accessing the various types of assistance and support, these FAQs [MS Word Document – 84.2 KB] may assist.

Lancefield insurance fact sheet:

Lancefield-Cobaw: Insurance information [PDF File – 56.8 KB]

Lancefield-Cobaw: Insurance information [MS Word Document – 9.2 KB]

– See more at: http://delwp.vic.gov.au/fire-and-emergencies/lancefield#sthash.kixh567C.dpuf

 

 

 

WINNERS ANNOUNCED AT FIRE AWARENESS AWARDS!

The Upper Campaspe Landcare Network was thrilled to be a partner in the Black Hill Fire Recovery team who recently were recipients of the two Fire Recovery Awards.

Macedon Ranges Shire Council, Friends of Black Hill Reserve, Loddon Prison Landmate Program, Upper Campaspe Landcare Network, CFA and Regional Arts Victoria, have won two awards for the recovery effort after the January bushfire that affected the Black Hill Reserve.

Awards won:
Winner of Recovery Award

Winner of RACV Insurance Award for Excellence

The winners of the prestigious awards were announced to an audience of more than 200 people from across the state, including community members , emergency services representatives and the Environment and Emergency Services Ministers.

Winning projects were diverse and included community resilience projects, Landcare recovery projects and education projects.

 

Well done to all the  people who were involved in this work.

UCLN was thrilled to be part of the Winning Team at the recent Fire Awareness Awards Night.

UCLN was thrilled to be part of the Winning Team at the recent Fire Awareness Awards Night.

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

 

 

SOme of the 120 women who recently attended the " Chicks in the Sticks" Event at Carlsruhe.        ©Scheltema

Some of the 120 women who recently attended the ” Chicks in the Sticks” Event at Carlsruhe.  ©Scheltema

 

 

The  November & December edition of the North Central Chat is here http://www.nccma.vic.gov.au/library/scripts/objectifyMedia.aspx?file=KMSMedia/pdf/141/77.pdf&fileName=North Central Chat- November December 2015.pdf

 

Hot topics include

–          November 2015 Chicks in the Sticks

–          Drone footage capturing Gorse removal

–          Cool Cows Workshop

–          Engaging the next Generation of Landcarers

–          River Detectives Program 2016 registrations now open

–          Events and Grant Funding opportunities!

 

 

Members of Baynton Sidonia Landcare  group at the recent "CHicks in the Sticks" event at Carlsruhe recently.©Scheltema

Some members of Baynton Sidonia Landcare group at the recent “Chicks in the Sticks” event at Carlsruhe recently.                                                               ©Scheltema

 

 

 

30TH ANNIVERSARY OF LANDCARE CELEBRATIONS NEXT YEAR.

 

Next year is the 30th Anniversary of Landcare in Victoria.The Macedon Ranges Shire Council and two Landcare Networks in our Region will be holding an event to celebrate this impressive milestone.

If you have any ideas for the event you can have input by accessing the online survey below.

 

Please see the attached online survey for the Landcare Forum ideas.

 

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Landcare2015

 

 

NORTH CENTRAL VICTORIA REGIONAL SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE STRATEGY NOW OUT

 

 

NCCMA SAS Summary 2015 December V3 (1) (1)-1_resize

 

Productive farming while protecting the natural resource base

Following months of community and stakeholder engagement the regionally endorsed 2015 north central Victoria Regional Sustainable Agriculture Strategy is released. The release of the Strategy comes at a time of high commodity prices, increasing demand for product, an unprecedented level of interest in investing in Australian agriculture, and a buoyant Victorian agricultural community that is positive about its future. At the same time the Strategy recognises the dry conditions that have prevailed across the region, both through the Millennium drought and also over the past two years.

The Strategy draws on the experiences and feedback of hundreds of land managers who have participated in sustainable agriculture programs in north central Victoria over the past ten years. Experienced practitioners, both from private industry and government programs, have also contributed in providing well-rounded perspectives.

Agriculture in north central Victoria continues to undergo rapid change and to achieve greater agricultural sustainability, there will need to be the balance between achieving greater farming productivity whilst protecting the natural resource base and investing in the capacity of our agricultural community. The change drivers affecting agriculture currently include an increasing climate variability; declining soil health; water reform and irrigation modernisation; technological advances; consumer demand for quality food and organic products and high animal welfare standards and expectations.

The Strategy will:

  • Strengthen the improvement of sustainable agriculture in the region over the next 15 years through strategic and practical measures.
  • Provide a regionally coordinated approach to sustainable agriculture that enhances and builds relationships between the region’s service providers, producers, manufacturers and consumers.
  • Function as a prospectus for attracting future investment and additional resources to achieve sustainable agriculture.

The full version of the Strategy can be found here: 2015 North Central Victoria Regional Sustainable Agriculture Strategy

 

 

 

COMMUNITIES FOR NATURE,WORK FOR THE DOLE  AND TYLDEN LANDCARE

Tylden Landcare has been working along the Little Coliban River under the Communities for Nature program, which aims to improve the condition of our natural landscapes.  Tylden Landcare partnered with the  Work for the Dole program.

The little Coliban River  area has a blackberry, gorse and willow problem,harbouring rabbits and foxes. Following a weed control program during 2015, a revegetation program was carried out along the Little Coliban River with Tylden Landcare and the Bendigo based work for the Dole program.

“Long term weed control can be achieved through an integrated program that includes chemical control, manual control, follow up works, planting alternative vegetation to suppress weed regrowth, and ongoing maintenance of plantings” said Brendan Smith of Tylden Landcare group. “The partnership between the landcare group, the Work for the Dole program and the community will help ensure sustainable conservation outcomes into the future”.

Many of the plants were Swamp Sedges and Tussock Grasses. Shrubs and trees were also included in the revegetation program and comprised Eucalypts, Acacias, Leptospermum, Cassinnia, Lomandra and the threatened Australian Anchor Plant. All of the plants were sourced from local seed provenances as these plants are acclimatised to our local area and geology.

Tylden Landcare was successful in obtaining a grant from the Victorian government under the Communities for Nature Landcare program. This program supports community groups, schools and volunteers doing work primarily focused on the environment. This has allowed Tylden Landcare to carry out follow up woody weed control works on earlier treated and revegetated areas further along the Little Coliban.

The best long term strategy for weed suppression is to replace weeds with an alternative cover. Along the Little Coliban River this has been achieved through revegetation using indigenous grasses, shrubs and trees. As part of this program around 2800 plants were put in along the Little Coliban- that’s 70 hyco trays, a pretty good effort by the works crew!

Tylden Landcare continues working along the Little Coliban River in conjunction with the Work for The Dole Project and Communities for Nature©Scheltema

Tylden Landcare continues working along the Little Coliban River in conjunction with the Work for The Dole Project and Communities for Nature  ©Scheltema

 

 

THE LATEST ISSUE OF LANDLINK IS OUT

The latest issue of Landlink has all all sorts of interesting stories in it.Go to link below for more info.

http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=c874938162801405204f0d115&id=3f8a026bbd&e=c16ae42b84

 

If its too hot to go outside there is a fascinating story in the Age about using taxidermy decoys to catch rare native brolgas! See link below.

 

http://www.theage.com.au/technology/sci-tech/ecologist-inka-veltheim-uses-taxidermy-decoys-to-catch-rare-native-brolga-20151118-gl1xwk

 

KYNETON SHOW

A big thankyou to all those volunteers who helped out recently on the Landcare Stall at the Kyneton Show.The Network purchased indigenous trees and shrubs which were handed out to showgoers on the day,and visitors were able to gain an understanding of the work of Landcare by looking at our display and chatting to members.Leftover trees from the show were donated to Trentham Landcarers who had recently lost plantings due to a late frost.

 

WISHING ALL LANDCARERS A SAFE AND HAPPY FESTIVE SEASON!

 

DSC_1026_resize

OCTOBER 2015

In this edition:

  • UCLN NETWORK NEWS
  • BLACK HILL RESERVE REOPENING
  • LANDMATE PROGRAM UP AND RUNNING WITH LANDCARE
  • INFORMATION SESSION ON EXOTIC STIPOID GRASSES
  •  TRENTHAM  LANDCARE TO BEGIN WORKS AT ENDERS BRIDGE
  • MALMSBURY AND DISTRICT LANDCARE RECEIVE FUNDING TO CONTINUE WORKS AT COMMON
  • NATIONAL BIRD WEEK
  • BRAEMAR STUDENTS HELP NEWHAM LANDCARE
  • CHICKS IN THE STICKS
  • NEED HELP TO TACKLE WEEDS IN YOUR LANDCARE AREA?
  • NORTH CENTRAL CHAT – NEW RABBIT CONTROL METHODS
  • INTERESTING EVENTS IN OUR AREA

 

After a cold and dry winter we are already battling hot and dry conditions in spring. ©Scheltema

After a cold and dry winter we are already battling hot and dry conditions in spring. ©Scheltema

 

 

Welcome to our spring ENews for a roundup of what’s been happening in our Network. After a cold and unusually dry winter, spring is upon us, surprising many of us with early hot dry conditions. Spring has brought the wonderful sounds of the poddlebonks and growls of the growling grass frogs to my dam, which is much lower than is usual for this time of the year.

Our thoughts go out to those Landcarers affected by the control burn that got out of control, burning four houses and 4000 hectares. It must be especially difficult for those in the north of our Network who were affected by fires earlier this year.

Let’s hope that as happened recently with the Friends of Black Hill and Langley Landcare, the Network can be of assistance in helping repair damage to Landcare projects.

 

For those Landcarers affected by the recent fires please see the link below which has a range of NRM information for Landholders recovering from fire.

 

http://www.landcarevic.net.au/resources/for-land-managers/fire-recovery-resources-for-landholders/resources

There is also a fencing day demo near Kilmore which may be useful to those who lost fences. (See flyer at bottom of ENews.)

 

 

Nodding  greenhood orchids are an early sign of spring  at Black Hill Reserve. ©Scheltema

Nodding greenhood orchids are an early sign of spring at Black Hill Reserve. ©Scheltema

 

UCLN NETWORK NEWS

 

UCLN members apply for a  grant to work towards the objectives of the Strategic Plan. ©Scheltema

UCLN members apply for a grant to work towards the objectives of the Strategic Plan.
©Scheltema

 

Several months ago the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network was hard at work applying for a Network Grant of $15,000 to help us achieve some of our objectives as outlined in our recently completed Strategic Plan (see http://www.uppercampaspelandcare.org.au/wp-content/uploads/UCLN-strategic-plan3.pdf ).

After much valuable consultation between groups we formed two “cluster groups”.

One group consists of members from Ashbourne, Tylden, Trentham and Malmsbury Landcare Groups to work on achieving greater ecological outcomes in “The Upper Coliban Corridor” (incorporating the Coliban River from Trentham Falls to Malmsbury Reservoir, Kangaroo Creek and the Little Coliban River).

The other group consists of members from Newham, Woodend and Carlsruhe Landcare Groups to work on the “Cobaw – Macedon Ranges to Campaspe Connections”.

If successful (and it is looking likely!) we intend to hold a series of action planning workshops that bring together expert ecological and community knowledge in each area. The workshops will involve walking stretches of the rivers identifying and documenting existing values, threats and conservation opportunities.

They will be led by ecologists and local indigenous representatives. Planning sessions will be incorporated into the field workshops.

The workshops will be supported with mapping and other information on conservation and land use issues.

This exciting project will benefit Landcare groups within our Network by building ecological knowledge and skills. It also has an important social component, helping to strengthen bonds and knowledge banks between groups.

A special thankyou to all our committee members, especially Sophie Bickford who worked so tirelessly on this project.

If you would like to read about this project in more detail please go to the link below.

Network_Grant_Application_Form_UCLN_FINAL (1)

 

 

UCLN Members aim work towards goals of Strategic Plan.©Scheltema

UCLN Members aim work towards goals of Strategic Plan.©Scheltema

TACKLING GORSE

The Network has recently been successful in a grant application for $4000.00 from the Gorse Taskforce to tackle the endless gorse problem in our region. Thank You Brendan Smith for your work on this issue.

AGM

The AGM for the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network will be held on Tuesday 10th November.We will be walking along the stretch of the Campaspe River that runs through the Botanic Gardens in Kyneton, to celebrate the excellent work done by the Campaspe River and Land Management Group in removing willows and revegetating. The AGM will be held over lunch at a nearby cafe. All welcome. More details soon.

NEW PROJECTOR AND SCREEN

The Network was recently successful in applying for a grant from Macedon Ranges Shire Council to purchase a data projector and screen. This is available for the Presidents of Landcare Groups within our Network to use. Please contact me if interested.

NEED HELP WITH MAPPING?

If any groups need help with mapping, (especially in acquitting their Victorian Landcare Grants from the last financial year), I have organised a session with the NCCMA’s mapping expert in Kyneton on Tuesday 20th October at 11.00am at the Piper St Food Store. Please contact me on 0408722997 or uclandcare@gmail.com if you are interested in coming.

BLACKHILL REOPENING

 

Visitors can once again enjoy the granite boulder country of Black Hill Reserve after it was recently reopened.©Scheltema

Visitors can once again enjoy the granite boulder country of Black Hill Reserve after it was recently reopened.©Scheltema

 

About 60 people gathered at Black Hill Reserve recently to celebrate its reopening after the completion of extensive works to repair damage done by the fires.

A welcome to Country was performed by Taungurung Elder, Lawrence Moser, who thanked the Friends Group for their hard work and dedication in caring for the Reserve.

The Network is proud to have been involved in the collaboration between the Friends Group, Macedon Ranges Shire Council and The Loddon Prison Landmate program to help repair damage done by the fires and once again make the Reserve a special place to visit. As Friends member Anita Leslie said “This is a special resource right here on our doorstep and it was nearly lost. I come here to listen to the silence, it’s settling for the soul.”

For media on the reopening go to http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3347545/life-returns-to-black-hill/

 

Friends of Black Hill members proudly showed visitors the abundant spring wildflowers at the Black Hill  Reserve reopening.©Scheltema

Friends of Black Hill members proudly showed visitors the abundant spring wildflowers at the Black Hill Reserve reopening.©Scheltema

 

 

 

LANDMATE PROGRAM UP AND RUNNING WITH LANDCARE.

As some of you know I have been involved in linking the Loddon Landmate project with Landcare projects. I am delighted to report that this collaboration has successfully begun.

Carlsruhe Landcare benefited from having the prisoners plant roughly 800 trees on their Bio link Project.  Here’s what Hanne, President of Carlsruhe Landcare had to say “We had the Loddon Prisoners from Castlemaine last Wednesday and Thursday and 700 trees were planted.  The weather was perfect and they did a fantastic job. Bill and I feel that it was worth every cent spent. Highly recommended for future projects.”

Langley Landcare were also pleased to have their plantings which were damaged by the fires replaced free of charge by the Prisoners. Langley Landcare member Rob Pearse said –“In January 2015 the 5Ks of Jim Poulter Creek that Langley Landcare had revegetated over 4 years was destroyed in a grassfire. As part of the regeneration planting after the fire prisoners from Loddon Prison, ably lead by Prison officer Tony Pritchard, planted approximately 2000 trees. This was fantastic effort and huge thanks to them for their work and the positive attitude they bought to the project.”

The prisoners also helped Newham Landcare with some works at Hanging Rock.

If any groups are interested in having the Landmate project provide some labour for their Landcare projects please let me know and I can help coordinate it.

The cost is $400 /day –for that you get a team of roughly 8 to 12 hardworking blokes with a fully qualified (fencing, weed control, planting) supervisor. All equipment and certification is provided.

 

INFORMATION SESSION ON EXOTIC STIPOID GRASSES

Need help identifying exotic Stipoid Grasses? Come along to an information session to teach you about this harmful weed.©Scheltema

Need help identifying exotic Stipoid Grasses? Come along to an information session to teach you about this harmful weed.©Scheltema

 

An information session on identifying Needle Grasses will take place on Saturday 17th October, from 10.30 am at Barfold Hall, 1909 Kyneton-Redesdale Rd, Barfold. All are welcome and there is no need to RSVP.

The session will be presented by Martin Deering, biosecurity officer for Loddon Mallee Region.

The session’s focus on identification and control methods will be extremely helpful for landholders wishing to protect their property from invasion by these plants, and for those who already have a problem and would like to know what their control options are.

Texas Needle Grass is fairly widespread in the upper Campaspe River catchment, between Kyneton and Lake Eppalock. In some places whole paddocks have been made unusable for grazing by an invasion of this perennial tussock-forming grass.

Chilean Needle Grass and Serrated Tussock are not well-established in the region but have the potential to be a serious threat to agriculture and the environment across the Mount Alexander Shire.

One of the big challenges for land managers concerned about Needle Grass is identifying the plant. Needle Grasses can look almost identical to native Spear Grasses, and as with many grasses, they are difficult to identify when not in flower.

This event is part of the Campaspe Valley Landcare Group’s ‘Stopping Stipoids in The Upper Campaspe’ project, funded by a Victorian Landcare Grant from the North Central Catchment Management Authority.

 

Malmsbury and District Landcare members identifying exotic stipoid grasses.©Scheltema

Malmsbury and District Landcare members identifying exotic stipoid grasses.©Scheltema

 

ENDERS BRIDGE TRENTHAM

Congratulations to Trentham Landcare for receiving a $7, 500.00 grant from Hepburn Shire Council to tackle willow removal at Enders Bridge Trentham.

This will have a wonderful impact on improving the flow of the Coliban River as it approaches the iconic Trentham Falls. Well done to all those who took the time to make this project happen.

 

MALMSBURY AND DISTRICT LANDCARE

As usual Malmsbury District Landcare group have been very busy with many projects. One of these projects is the Malmsbury Common .The Malmsbury group was recently successful in obtaining a $4100.00 Victorian Landcare grant to continue weed control and  native revegetation works at the Common. The Malmsbury Youth Justice centre will be involved in the Weed Removal.

Malmsbury and District Landcare group was succesful in their application for a Victorian Landcare Grant to continue weed removal and revegetation works at the Malmsbury Common.©Scheltema

Malmsbury and District Landcare group was succesful in their application for a Victorian Landcare Grant to continue weed removal and revegetation works at the Malmsbury Common.©Scheltema

NATIONAL BIRD WEEK

 

A winter visitor to my garden.Be part of a citizen science project by taking part in the Great Backyard Bird Count.©Scheltema

A winter visitor to my garden.Be part of a citizen science project by taking part in the Great Backyard Bird Count.©Scheltema

 

 

Celebrate National Bird Week 2015 by taking part in the biggest citizen science project to hit Aussie shores!  From 19-25 October, thousands of people from across the country are heading out into their backyards, local parks, or favourite outdoor spaces to take part in the second annual AUSSIE BACKYARD BIRD COUNT!   This is an initiative of Bird Life Australia.

To get involved in the Aussie Backyard Bird Count, all you need is 20 minutes, your outdoor space of choice, and some keen eyesight (or binoculars).  It doesn’t matter if you’re a novice or an expert.  Simply record the birds you know and look up those you don’t on Bird Life’s new Aussie Bird Count app or our through their website (www.aussiebirdcount.org.au).  You’ll instantly see live statistics and information on how many people are taking part near you and the number of birds and species counted across your neighbourhood and the whole of Australia.

 

Not only will you get to know your feathered neighbours, but you’ll be contributing to a vital pool of information from across the nation that will help us see how Australian birds are faring.  Last year volunteers counted 800,000 birds from across Australia, this year Birdlife Australia hopes to make it to at least one million. Get your friends and family together, head into the great outdoors and start counting!

For more information head to www.aussiebirdcount.org.au (Thanks to Tanya Loos for this info)

 

Take part in an exciting citizen science project counting birds.©Scheltema

Take part in an exciting citizen science project counting birds.©Scheltema

 

 

BIRD WALK ALONG THE CAMPASPE RIVER

 

Baynton Sidonia Landcare Group is hosting a Bird Walk at Glenhope on the Campaspe River on Monday 19 October from 9am to 1pm. Experienced local birdwatchers Cathy Newing and Mark Buckby from Woodend Bird Observers Club will be present to assist with identification.

The walk down to the river is about two kilometres of occasionally rocky and steep terrain. Participants will need to be moderately fit and agile and wear appropriate clothing. To secure a place, please contact Clare on 5423 4152 or email clare@knco.net by Friday 16 October.

 

 

BRAEMAR STUDENTS HELP NEWHAM LANDCARE WITH NEST BOXES

Braemar students hard at work painting nest boxes to be installed at Hanging Rock. ©Scheltema

Braemar students hard at work painting nest boxes to be installed at Hanging Rock. ©Scheltema

 

Year nine Braemar Students are taking part in a project with Newham Landcare to paint and install Nest Boxes made by the Woodend Mens Shed at Hanging Rock. Student Bea Bragaglia said “I think people need to become more aware of how many animals are becoming extinct and what we can do to stop that.We need to help keep the natural environment safe for them.”

Another student involved in the project, Catherine Ott,said “Its important that we help sustain the environment for future generations to come. The nesting boxes are important to create a home for animals which are struggling to find one.”

NEED TO TACKLE WEEDS IN YOUR LANDCARE AREA?

If you are in the Macedon Shire and need help with weed control this may be useful to you:

The Community Weed Partnership Program

The new Community Weed Partnership Program has been released to members of local Landcare and Friends Groups. This funding is for groups to undertake weed control works on Council-managed land, including bushland reserves and roadside areas.

Groups can apply for up to $1,500 for weed control works. Please contact Michelle Patrick via mpatrick@mrsc.vic.gov.au for more information. Please note that this funding is in addition to Council’s $800 Landcare and Friends Group Grant which will be available early next year.

 

Enjoying the scent of wattle at spring time.  ©Scheltema

Enjoying the scent of wattle at spring time. ©Scheltema

 

 

CHICKS IN THE STICKS

The North Central CMA has announced the upcoming 2015 Chicks in the Sticks Rural Womens’ event on Saturday 28th November.

“Now in its third year, the annual rural women’s event has become one of the most successful platforms in our region to network, learn from and collaborate with like-minded women who are passionate about environmental action and sustainable agriculture.

“This year’s event will take place along the Campaspe River at Carlsruhe with keynote speaker Katie Finlay- RIDRC Rural Woman of the Year; Victorian award winner.

All the event details are on the flyer (CLICK HERE) and RSVPs to the North Central CMA are essential (Phone 03 5448 7124). Last year they booked out quickly, with 120 women registering in just two weeks.  This year has the capacity to host 150 women, so if you are interested it’d be best to book your place sooner rather than later.

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

The latest issue of the NCCMA’s North Central Chat is now out. For those of you with a rabbit problem there is some useful information on the release of the new strain of Calicivirus which may be helpful to you. http://www.nccma.vic.gov.au//library/scripts/objectifyMedia.aspx?file=KMSMedia/pdf/137/69.pdf&fileName=North%20Central%20Chat-%20September%202015.pdf

 

INTERESTING EVENTS IN OUR AREA YOU MAY WISH TO ATTEND:

 

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JUNE 9TH

  • STRATEGIC PLAN LAUNCHED ON THE BANKS OF THE CAMPASPE

  • SUCCESSFUL MOTHERS DAY PLANTING BY CAMPASPE  RIVER AND LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP

  • NEST BOXES INSTALLED AT BALD HILL

  • CARLSRUHE BEGINS BIOLINK

  • LODDEN PRISON LANDMATE PROJECT TO WORK WITH LANDCARE

  • BLACK HILL ARTS PROJECT

  • UCLN MEETS WITH MINISTER FOR ENVIRONMENT, LAND AND WATER

  • FAREWELL TO JOAN KIRNER

  • 2015 LANDCARE AWARDS

  • MT ALEXANDER LANDCARE FORUM 19TH JUNE

  • PASTURE MANAGEMENT AND CROPPING FIELD DAY 16TH JUNE

  • GEOLOGY OF HANGING ROCK-FREE EVENT  SUNDAY 14TH JUNE

 

 

 

 

A scarlet robin,a sure sign of the colder weather at my place.

A scarlet robin, a sure sign of the colder weather at my place.

 

When the scarlet robin starts appearing at my place its a  sign of  colder weather coming. Lots of you have been braving the weather holding working bees and getting trees into the ground. Others have been installing nest boxes and conducting educational activities. The Network has been very busy with the Launch of the Strategic Plan and meetings with the Environment Minister, local government and Loddon Prison

 

Check our website if you would like to see recent media about Network activities  http://www.uppercampaspelandcare.org.au/media/.

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC PLAN LAUNCHED ON BANKS OF THE CAMPASPE

 

 

The UCLN Strategic   Plan being unveiled by Mayors from the Macedon Ranges and Mt Alexander Shires,Christine Henderson and  Jennifer Anderson,with Councillor Sebastian Klein from Hepburn Shire Council.The Plan was launched on a redgum tree on the banks of the Campaspe River in Langley.

The UCLN Strategic Plan being unveiled by Mayors from the Macedon Ranges and Mt Alexander Shires, Christine Henderson and Jennifer Anderson, with Councillor Sebastian Klein from Hepburn Shire Council. The Plan was launched on a redgum tree on the banks of the Campaspe River in Langley.

 

 

Over 50 people braved wet and blustery conditions to pick their way through paddocks in Langley down to the Campaspe River to Launch the UCLN Strategic Plan. A barista was on hand to warm people up with lovely coffee and tea and in usual Landcare style there was a terrific spread of goodies to eat. People mingled and warmed themselves by the fires as they waited for the official unveiling, an elaborate pulley system which lifted the red velvet cloth to reveal the Plan!

The Mayors from  Mt Alexander and and Macedon Ranges Shire, Cr Christine Henderson and Cr Jennifer Anderson, accompanied by Cr Sebastian Klein from Hepburn Shire Council cut the red ribbon to unveil the Plan which was presented on a four hundred year old Redgum tree.

President of Newham Landcare, Peny Roberts, spoke wonderfully about the many social and environmental benefits of Landcare. Her speech was followed by  two students from Newham Primary School  who spoke eloquently. 12 year old Sydney and 11 yr old Tom said, “Without Landcare planting trees and protecting important wildlife and vegetation areas our flora and fauna would decline, quite dramatically due to carelessness and human destruction.”

“If we want to see this natural wonderland stay the same in years to come, it is vital that we educate this generation, and future generations about Landcare and how to look after the land, to preserve Australia. If we don’t, we will see native species become seriously endangered and possibly extinct.”

“Landcare means so much to our school and we don’t know where we would be without it.”

The Member for Macedon, Mary-Anne Thomas MP was also present, along with representatives from Coliban Water, North Central Catchment Authority, Parks Victoria, students from Langley and Newham Primary Schools and representatives from the sixteen Landcare Groups that comprise the Network.

The Strategic Plan was generously funded by grants from the Norman Wettenhall Foundation and Victorian Landcare.

The Network will now begin outlining how we will move forward towards the goals outlined in the Plan. Congratulations to all those who worked so hard on it!

http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3078721/braving-the-elements-landcare-heads-to-the-river-to-launch-strategic-plan/

 

 

UCLN Memebrs and MP Mary-Anne THomas with the newly unveiled Strategic Plan on the banks of the Campapse at Langley.

UCLN Memebrs and MP Mary-Anne THomas with the newly unveiled Strategic Plan on the banks of the Campapse at Langley.

 

 

MOTHERS DAY PLANTING ON THE CAMPASPE RIVER AT KYNETON

 

 

Una Burke,Jesse Smith,Marigold Bickford, Jem Burke,Sophie Bickford and Liana Spoke preparing for the Trees For Mum planting event in the Kyneton Botanic Garden . The event was hosted by the Campapse River Land Management Group as a way to celebrate and commemorate mums.Una said ."I'd like to plant a tree for my mum because my mums really lovely to me and I want to do something to make her remember this Mothers Day."

Una Burke, Jesse Smith, Marigold Bickford, Jem Burke, Sophie Bickford and Liana Spoke preparing for the Trees For Mum planting event in the Kyneton Botanic Garden .
The event was hosted by the Campapse River Land Management Group as a way to celebrate and commemorate mums. Una said .”I’d like to plant a tree for my mum because my mum’s really lovely to me and I want to do something to make her remember this Mothers Day.”

 

 

About 40 people braved rain and cold conditions to honour their mums this Mother’s Day by planting a tree for her on the Campaspe River in the Kyneton Botanic Gardens. Free trees were also available  from the Woodend Landcare Group to be planted at home.

Trees for Mum is a National Landcare Event and open to anyone who would like to plant a tree for their mum, or take part in the event with their mother or grandmother, whilst doing something for the Environment.

Trees for Mum was first started in Sydney in 2002 by friends and colleagues, Deena Raphael and Lauren Adlam, as a way of paying tribute to their mums, who they had both lost to cancer.

Since then more than 20,000 trees have been planted at Trees for Mums events across Australia as tributes to mothers who have passed away or to celebrate those who are still alive.

Campaspe River Land Management Group has worked for over twenty years clearing weeds and planting natives along the Campaspe River behind Kyneton, and they hosted the day as part of their “A River Runs Through It” project to remove willows and plant natives along the Campapse River near Kyneton.

“This is a way for all users along the river –cyclists, walkers and residents, to help restore the health of the river environs where it flows through Kyneton” said Don Smith, member of Campaspe River Land Management Group.  “Revegetation works will help ensure good outcomes for our local river and will also complement the North Central Catchment Managements Caring for Campaspe Program.” Don added.

“We’re excited to be hosting the Trees for Mum event in Kyneton this year” said Jessie Smith of the Campaspe River Working Group.

“We’ll be planting along the river walk in Kyneton as part of our on-going work to encourage native wildlife and make the area an enjoyable place to visit” added Mrs Smith.

 http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3054738/plant-a-tree-for-mum/

 

 

NEST BOXES INSTALLED AT BALD HILL

 

Austin and Oliver May (4 and 6 yrs old) were thrilled to be part of a team of people at Bald Hill Reserve on Saturday installing nest boxes for sugar gliders and phascogales. They are seen here with their mother Amanda May.Members of Friends of Bald Hill and the Environmental Officer of Macedon Ranges Shire Council William Terry installed 7 boxes on the day,which were made by the Woodend Mens Shed.

Austin and Oliver May (4 and 6 yrs old) were thrilled to be part of a team of people at Bald Hill Reserve on Saturday installing nest boxes for sugar gliders and phascogales. They are seen here with their mother Amanda May. Members of Friends of Bald Hill and the Environmental Officer of Macedon Ranges Shire Council, William Terry, installed 7 boxes on the day, which were made by the Woodend Mens Shed.

 

The Friends of Bald Hill had a working bee  to install nest boxes for phascogales and sugar gliders. About twelve people, including William Terry, the Environmental Officer from Macedon Ranges Shire Council, were hard at work installing new homes for the gliders and phascogales.
Both animals usually nest in hollows in trees but due to a shortage of hollow bearing trees, the nest boxes can provide a suitable alternative.
Phascogales are a close relative to the Tasmanian Devil and they are under pressure due to a loss of habitat. They are already extinct in South Australia.
The Brush tailed Phascogale lives an interesting life. Males die during their first year of life after an intense breeding season. Females live another 3 to 4 years and give birth to as many as ten young that they carry around on their backs.
The tiny sugar gliders can glide the length of a football field and have a sweet tooth. They feed on nectar, tree sap, seeds and insects. In winter they can go into a state of torpor, or hibernation, for 13 hrs at a time to conserve energy.
The Friends Of Bald Hill hopes that the installation of nest boxes will increase the number of sugar gliders and phascogales in the Reserve. Cameras attached to long poles will be used to check the nest boxes in the future. More will be installed over the coming months. Go to http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3038913/new-homes-for-gliders/
Austin and Oliver May (4 and 6 yrs old) were thrilled to be part of a team of people at Bald Hill Reserve on Saturday installing nest boxes for sugar gliders and phascogales. They are seen here with the Environmental Officer of Macedon Ranges Shire Council William Terry.Seven nest boxes were installed  on the day,which were made by the Woodend Mens Shed.The Friends group will work with council to install more in the coming months in an effort to increase the population of the gliders and phascogales.

Austin and Oliver May (4 and 6 yrs old) were thrilled to be part of a team of people at Bald Hill Reserve on Saturday installing nest boxes for sugar gliders and phascogales. They are seen here with the Environmental Officer of Macedon Ranges Shire Council, William Terry. Seven nest boxes were installed on the day, which were made by the Woodend Mens Shed. The Friends group will work with council to install more in the coming months in an effort to increase the population of the gliders and phascogales.

Manu helps out with the installation of Nest Boxes at Bald Hill Reserve.

Manu helps out with the installation of Nest Boxes at Bald Hill Reserve.

CARLSRUHE BEGINS BIOLINK

 

 

Hanne Juul and Bill Taylor examine some of the trees they previously planted on the John Morieson Biolink in Carlsruhe.

Hanne Juul and Bill Taylor examine some of the trees they previously planted on the John Morieson Biolink in Carlsruhe.

 

The Carlsruhe Landcare group  received a $5000.00 Communities For Nature grant from DELWP (Department of Environment,Land, Water and Planning) to establish a 2 km long biolink between the Cobaw State Forest and the Campapse River on a strip of land adjacent to the township of Carlsruhe.
Member Bill Taylor said “It is really to provide a corridor from the Cobaw State Forest down to the Campaspe River. We’re trying to create a wildlife corridor, a refuge for koalas and an escape route for the wildlife in the event of fire. We’ve planted lots of manna gums already.” The group conducted a successful working bee recently to plant many more trees to help establish the biolink.
President of Carlsruhe Landcare Hanne Juul said, “The wildlife corridor will link up with Newham Landcare’s biolink project which will eventually connect Hanging Rock and the Cobaws. Our planting is on a strip of government land that will be used to create this biolink.”
Bill Taylor from Carlsruhe Landcare on the John Morieson Biolink in Carlsruhe.The group saims to link their planting with the Cobaw State

Bill Taylor from Carlsruhe Landcare on the John Morieson Biolink in Carlsruhe. The group aims to link their planting with the Cobaw State

 

 

LODDON PRISON LANDMATE PROJECT

 

 

I met with staff from Corrections Victoria and DEWLP to discuss the possibility of Landcare  projects working with the Landmate program,which is run by Corrections Victoria (out of Lodden Prison in our area)

Rural communities across Victoria have benefited from the Landmate program , which has worked successfully for over 20 years. It is a joint program between DELWP  and Corrections Victoria.

Landmate crews consist of 8 to 10 minimum security prisoners working on environmental activities. They are supervised by qualified and experienced prison staff equipped with four wheel drives, chainsaws, fencing equipment, spraying equipment and tools.

They are experienced at fencing, weed removal, planting and vermin control, erosion control amongst other activities and have all necessary certifications.

Apart from the environmental benefits the program makes an important contribution to prisoner rehabilitation, with prisoners developing their life and employment skills and learning to work as a team. The purpose of the program is to provide labour for environmental and land management activities on private and public land, with an emphasis on broader environmental activities.

There is a cost of $400 day of the team, but it is very good value for money as the teams are efficient and very capable.

A team will soon be helping Langley Landcare to replace plantings lost earlier this year in the fires. They will also be helping with planting at the Carlsruhe Biolink and undertaking works at Hanging Rock for Newham Landcare.

If you are interested in being involved in the program please contact me. I will then put you in touch with the relevant person. Aside from the initial consultation with the supervisor, Landcare people do not have to attend the work whilst it is being undertaken, but just be a contact person explaining what needs to be done. A quick google search should convince you of how successful this program has been!

 

 

Fox control,Central Vic style.

Fox control, Central Vic style.

 

BLACK HILL ARTS PROJECT

 

 

RObert Pearse from Langley Landcare looks out form the top of Black Hill Reserve.An exciting new arts project is planned for the area.

Robert Pearse from Langley Landcare looks out form the top of Black Hill Reserve. An exciting new arts project is planned for the area.

An exciting new Arts project will soon to be chosen to celebrate Black Hill Reserve and the community that cares for it. Regional Arts Victoria and the Macedon Ranges Shire Council called for expressions of interest from artists.

The responses have been narrowed down to two after consultation with members of Friends Of Black Hill, Regional Arts Vic and MRSC. One of the final proposals is a photographic light show project and the other a sculpture project. Both would involve working with the Langley School.

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 UCLN MEETS WITH THE MINISTER FOR ENVIRONMENT, LAND AND WATER THE HON LISA NEVILLE

 

UCLN members show the Minister for Environment,Climate Change and Water the beginnings of a biolink at Newham.

UCLN members show the Minister for Environment,Climate Change and Water the beginnings of a biolink at Newham.

Our Network was invited to meet with the Minister when she was in our area last week. We showed her a biolink project being undertaken by Newham Landcare (while three wedgetail eagles flew above) then met with her later in the day in Trentham. Barry Elliot, Alan Denehey, Sophie Bickford, Amanda May and myself spoke to her for half an hour, while in true Trentham style it snowed outside.

We explained to her the work that the individual groups in our Network undertake and gave her a briefing on the contents of the Strategic Plan, which we presented to her during the meeting. We spoke about how Landcare activities in our area are not just about sustainable agriculture, soil health, protection of riparian areas and weed removal, but also about creating wildlife corridors and bioinks and linking people. Sophie Bickford, who is on our committee and also from Central Victorian Biolinks explained how the work we intend to do creating biolinks, will tie in with larger projects within Central Victoria to protect and connect remnant vegetation.

It was a fantastic opportunity to let her know of the important work we are dong and how vital it is to continue funding this work.

For local media on the visit go to http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3132223/rock-review-to-begin/

 

 

FAREWELL TO LANDCARE PIONEER JOAN KIRNER

 

In 2014 Joan said that “Landcare was built on sustainability. It’s now national and international. And it’s based on community ownership of community change principle. I’m very proud of Landcare.”

The principles of local action, practical solutions, and working together are her legacy and still guide Landcare today.

 

Joan Kirner at the Launch of Landcare 25th November 1986 with Alan Malcolm,Joan Kirner,Minister For COnservation,and Andrew Cameron from the Victorian Farmers Federation.

Joan Kirner at the Launch of Landcare 25th November 1986 with Alan Malcolm, Joan Kirner, Minister For Conservation,and Andrew Cameron from the Victorian Farmers Federation.  Photo source:Landcare in Victoria by Rob Youl,via Victorian Dep.Archives.

 

 

 

The article below appeared in a Landlink publication recently and may be of interest to many of you as it explains Joan Kirner’s involvement in the foundation of Landcare.

 

It is with fondness and admiration that we remember Joan Kirner today as an inspirational figure for many, and a true Landcare pioneer.

Joan Kirner will undoubtedly be remembered as Victoria’s first female premier, however she will also be remembered in the heart of every Landcarer as an innovative politician, who recognised the value and importance of implementing Landcare as a policy – leading to its adoption as a national initiative years later.

Minister for Conservation, Forests and Lands at the time, Joan Kirner worked together with Heather Mitchell, then president of the Victorian Farmers Federation to spearhead the initiative. Through this partnership, Joan learnt that there was a pressing need to develop a program that would reverse the degradation of farmland, public land and our waterways.

A story recounted in Andrew Campbell’s book, “Landcare – Communities Shaping the Land and the Future”, outlines how the name Landcare came about.

A group of staff tasked with drafting a proposal for a program based on neighbourhood groups, tossed around some names and proposed to Joan Kirner, the name ‘Total Land Care’. The story goes that Joan Kirner retorted that she did not want to be known as “The Minister for TLC”, so it became simply ‘LandCare.’

With the generous support of community members, farmers and Departmental officers, Heather Mitchell and Joan Kirner were able to launch ‘Landcare’ in central Victoria in 1985. By the end of 1986 there were about ten LandCare groups in Victoria. By 1989, LandCare was launched as a national program, and today, there are upwards of 5,000 groups across the country.

Joan Kirner continued to support Landcare throughout her lifetime, and just before her death wrote to the editor of the Landcare magazine and said -“As an early participant in the creation of Landcare, I felt that I had to write and tell you how delighted I am with the program, its longevity, results and the new initiative in Indigenous Landcare. My former colleague, the late Heather Mitchell would be delighted too! Please pass on my congratulations to all landcarers.”

Below are two articles that have been written about Joan Kirner’s involvement with Landcare for those who would like to learn more about her involvement with the Landcare movement.

Victorian Landcare Website –http://www.landcarevic.net.au/news/vale-joan-kirner

 

 

 

2015 State & Territory Landcare Awards

 

Celebrate a local Landcare project or hero!

Nominations are open in Victoria until June 21st.
Celebrating a silver milestone this year, the awards celebrate the achievements of Landcare across a number of diverse areas, including sustainable farming, Coastcare, Junior Landcare, Indigenous land management, and more.

With nine national categories to choose from, you’ll find one to fit any kind of Landcare project or local hero, and all winners at a State and Territory level will proceed as finalists to the 2016 National Landcare Awards.

If you are involved in protecting or improving your local environment, farm, coastline, bushland, wetland, waterway, school, region, catchment or backyard, there is a category in this year’s awards to suit you.

To nominate, please go to the online entry portal . You will need to set up an account in the portal, which will allow you to save your entry as you go, and finish it at a later stage. Refer to the ‘entry requirements ’ and ‘entry rules and conditions ’ documents for detailed guidelines, terms and conditions relating to all entries.

Entries close in  Victoria on June 21st

Who Can Enter?

Anyone involved in projects that care for our land or water is welcome to apply.  Landcare is a movement of individuals and groups focusing on managing the environment in their local area. Within the Landcare Awards, the term ‘Landcare’ refers to all groups, individuals, organisations and activities that care for the land.  This includes, but is not limited to: Landcare, Coastcare, Bushcare, Dunecare, Rivercare, ‘Friends of’ groups, farmers, professional farming systems groups, natural resource management, Junior Landcare (including day care centres, primary and secondary schools, youth groups, scout groups, etc.), Urban Landcare and Indigenous Landcare.

National Categories

There are nine national categories, which are open to each state and territory – aside from ACT, where the Coastcare category isn’t available.  Some states and territories also have their own additional categories. Please click on the list below for a summary of each category.  Please see the online entry portal for detailed criteria for each category or download the entry brochure for each state or territory in the coordinator section below.

Victoria

Landcare Network Award – $500
This award will be made to an outstanding Landcare network that is working towards sustainable land use through the development or adoption of sound land management practices on public or private land, and/or is undertaking on-ground work to protect, enhance or restore a significant area on behalf of the community.

Dr. Sidney Plowman Travel and Study Award – $4,000
The Dr. Sidney Plowman Travel and Study Award will be awarded to one employee of the Department of Environment, Land, Water & Planning (DELWP), Department of Economic Development, Jobs Transport and Resources (DEDJTR) or a Victorian Catchment Management Authority.

VFF/FTLA Heather Mitchell Memorial Fellowship – $4,000
The Heather Mitchell Memorial Fellowship is open to community members and Landcare support staff (i.e. Landcare facilitators, coordinators, project officers) of Victorian Landcare (or other community-based NRM) groups or networks. The Fellowship is not open to State Government employees.

Your 2015 State & Territory Landcare Award Coordinators

 

VICYvonne Ryczkowski
Department of Environment, Land, Water & Planning
Ph: 03 9637 8480
E: cel.hub@delwp.vic.gov.auDownload the VIC Landcare Awards brochure here.

 

 

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Pasture Management & Multi-species Pasture Cropping Field Day 16 June 2015

Baynton Hall

 

The North Central Catchment Management Authority is hosting a Pasture Management & Multi-species Pasture Cropping Field Day at the Baynton Hall on Tuesday 16 June from 9.00 am – 4.00 pm.

 

At the field day you can:

  • Hear from the pioneer of pasture cropping.
  • Learn more about grazing management.
  • Find out how these innovative techniques can increase on-farm productivity.
  • Visit local farm site.

 

Participants will hear from Colin Sies, founder of pasture cropping. Multi-species pasture cropping uses a group of plant species that produce good quality forage, have a range of different root systems, includes legume species, flowering plants and species that will add to organic matter on the soil surface and in the soil as root mass.

 

Multi-species pasture cropping involves sowing several different plant species with similar growing times – instead of sowing one species into dormant grassland – with the aim of producing better quality forage and improving soil health. Colin will be joined by Graeme Hand who is passionate about regenerating perennial pastures and grasslands using planned grazing management.

 

Graeme has a special interest in working with family farms, to manage holistically, helping to create profitable, regenerative farm businesses which are enjoyable to work in.

 

To RSVP, or for more information and a flyer, go to the North Central CMA website HERE.

 

Free event: the geology of Hanging Rock – Sunday 14 June

by woodendlandcare

Free Event - The Geology of Hanging Rock 14th June

How did Hanging Rock form? How big was it at birth? How long until it erodes to nothing?

For the answers to these questions and more, join the Friends of Hanging Rock for a tour and presentation on the fascinating geology of Hanging Rock, led by Professor David Philips, Head of the School of Earth Sciences at University of Melbourne.

All welcome; no reservations necessary.

11:00 am – 12:30 pm, Sunday 14 June
The Hut, Hanging Rock Reserve (The Hut is 100m north of the Hanging Rock Café)

 

 

 

And finally  The May edition of the North Central chat is now available on the Victorian Landcare Gateway website.

 

 

APRIL 13th

 

  •  GOOD NEWS FOR LANDCARE FACILITATORS
  • VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION EVENT
  • TYLDEN LANDCARE PROJECT STORY IN NORTH CENTRAL CHAT
  • BIRDSONG,MUSIC AND THE EVOLUTION OF LISTENING

 

Environment Minister Announces  continued Funding

For Landcare Facilitators

 

Member for Macedon, Mary-Anne Thomas (far right), speaks to landcare members about the Labor Government's commitment to ensure funding for landcare facilitators. She is  seen here with (left to right) Oliver, Malcolm and Meg Shurell from Newham Landcare, Alan Denehey (president of Ashbourne Landcare), Penny Roberts (president of Newham and District Landcare), and Angela and Alice Van Dam from Woodend Landcare. They are walking in a landcare planting area which is part of a wildlife and biodiversity corridor. Photo: Sandy Scheltema<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />

Member for Macedon, Mary-Anne Thomas (far right), speaks to Landcare members about the Labor Government’s commitment to ensure funding for Landcare facilitators. She is seen here with (left to right) Oliver,Malcolm and Meg Shurell from Newham Landcare, Alan Denehey (president of Ashbourne Landcare), Penny Roberts (president of Newham and District Landcare), and Angela and Alice Van Dam from Woodend Landcare. They are walking in a landcare planting area which is part of a wildlife and biodiversity corridor near Hanging Rock.. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

For the full article go to link below.

 http://www.elliottmidnews.com.au/story/3000084/local-projects-to-benefit/

 

 

 

1 May 2015 – North Central Volunteer Recognition Event

 

If you’re a Landcare or Waterwatch volunteer from the North Central region then you’re invited to a special event to celebrate your achievements.

The volunteer recognition event being run by the North Central Catchment Management Authority on Friday 1st May 2015 will have a range of activities on offer, including:

  • Guided tour of a local Landcare and Waterwatch projects
    CMA invite pic– Discover borth central Victoria’s rare Yarra Gums and Snow Gums.
    – Learn about Birch’s Creek and its resident Platypus.
  • Twilight picnic against the backdrop of Anderson’s Mill at Smeaton.
  • Moonlight cinema showcasing short films from the EnvironmentalFilm Festival Melbourne.

When: Friday 1 May 2015

Time: 4.00 pm – Guided tour
5.30 pm – Twilight picnic and moonlight cinema
9.00 pm – Event close

Where: Anderson’s Mill, Creswick-Newstead Road, Smeaton

Cost: FREE. BYO warm clothing, picnic and drinks. BBQ dinner and cheese platters available for purchase.

RSVP: Is essential to the North Central CMA by Wednesday 29 April 2015 via email info@nccma.vic.gov.au or phone 03 5448 7124. Please advise if you are buying dinner and/or cheese platter

 

 

 

 

 

North Central Chat Out with an Article about Tylden Landcare’s Project

 

http://www.nccma.vic.gov.au/library/scripts/objectifyMedia.aspx?file=KMSMedia/pdf/128/45.pdf&fileName=North%20Central%20Chat-%20March%202015.pdf

 

 

 

 

23 April 2015 – Why music happened; birdsong, music and the evolution of listening

 

The Castlemaine Library is set to come alive later this month with the sounds of bird calls, frog choruses and drumbeats.  “Why music happened; birdsong, music and the evolution of listening” is a  sonic journey presented by Andrew Skeoch.

AndrewS 500

Andrew will explore how nature – through birdsong, animal calls, insect and frog choruses – uses sound to communicate, survive and adapt, and will discuss how music has evolved in our own species.

Andrew is a bioacoustic researcher, musician and sound recordist.  His intriguing conclusions are supported by audio recordings made over 20 years in wild habitats the world over, and will have you appreciating music from an entirely fresh perspective.

This free event is being hosted by the Castlemaine Library – Bookings are essential – please click here or phone the library on 5472 1458.
Light refreshments provided.

Thursday, 23 April 2015 – 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Castlemaine Library

 

 

 

 

 

March 2015

 

  Powerful Owls

 

This arrived just after the March ENews went out but I know lots of you are interested in Powerful Owls .Open the link below for the fascinating full article (with great pictures) about the owls published in the Autumn edition of Wildlife Australia.Interesting to read that the hollows they need for their nests take about 300 to 400 years to develop.Keep planting Landcarers!

 

 

 

 

Powerful owls Bronwyn Isaac March 2015-1_resize

 

 

Powerful owls Bronwyn Isaac March 2015