MARCH 2019

“WE INHERITED A BEAUTIFUL PLANET FROM OUR ANCESTORS, NOW IT IS TIME TO LEAVE IT IN THE BEST SHAPE POSSIBLE FOR THE GENERATION TO COME.”

Utsah Shrestha

Newham and District Landcare member Penny Roberts and Hanging Rock Environmental officer Daniel Young working to protect threatened species.

Welcome to the Autumn edition of of the UCLN Enews. I hope you enjoy reading about the latest wonderful events and resources on offer, and are inspired by the  efforts of our Landcarer’s in the district.

  • PLATYPUS PROJECT CONTINUES
  • PROTECTING PRECIOUS SPECIES
  • SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES SUCCESS
  • REMOTE CAMERA TRAINING
  • PIPERS CREEK LANDCARE CHOOK WORKSHOP
  • UCLN NOW ON INSTAGRAM
  • SOIL MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
  • EVENTS, RESOURCES AND GRANTS

PLATYPUS PROJECT CONTINUES

The UCLN conducted its first Citizen Science day to collect water samples from the Campaspe and Coliban Rivers to gather data for the Platypus Project, a collaboration with platypus ecologist Josh Griffiths from EnviroDNA. Photo Zoos Victoria.

Our first Citizen Scientist day was conducted recently as part of the UCLN Platypus Project.It was fantastic to see community groups, Landcare, Government Agencies and local landowners come together for the day as Citizen Scientists to help collect platypus DNA for ecologist Josh Griffiths from EnviroDNA. They were targeting critical refuge areas during the dry summer months along the Campaspe and Coliban Rivers.
You can read more about the day here : /working-together-to-protect-waterways/ 

On the first UCLN Citizen Science day to test for platypus DNA

Four schools have also been involved in the project testing the Campaspe River in the north at Redesdale, the south at Ashbourne, on the Coliban at Taradale and in the middle of our project area at Kyneton. Over 300 enthusiastic students have taken on the role of platypus protectors and learnt about waterway health.

Read more about the schools involvement in the project here: https://www.midlandexpress.com.au/platypus-protectors/

Molly Spencer-Stewart, a year 12 student from the Alice Miller School said “Learning about biodiversity and the importance of maintaining it in Australia (because of our endemic and endangered species) is vital for our future. We’re the leaders of the next generation and we need to be empowered with the knowledge to be able to act upon these issues like how to protect platypus. Having Josh here today allowed us to participate in the steps towards documenting and protecting platypus in our area.”

You can see footage from  WIN News 9 on the project by going to our Facebook page www.facebook.com/UpperCampaspeLandcareNetwork/

In the UCLN project area there are currently only 12 historical records of platypus highlighting how little we know about platypus in the area. The ongoing work being undertaken by this project will help address this lack of knowledge. Platypus ecologist Josh Griffiths said This project will enable us to map platypus occurrence throughout the region to target conservation efforts such as revegetation or improved flows. We are already seeing widespread declines in platypus populations and climate change will make things worse with less rainfall and longer, more frequent droughts. It’s critical that we understand where they are and how we can best improve conditions to allow them to thrive.

We will be conducting another Citizen Science day to collect samples from 50 sites along the rivers in the breeding season in spring.

PROTECTING PRECIOUS SPECIES

The unassuming little Basalt Peppercress plant, a nationally endangered species, is being given a new chance of life at the iconic Hanging Rock Reserve thanks to Newham and District Landcare Group.

“With this biolink our long-term aim is to provide a habitat link between Cobaw State Forest and Macedon Regional Park. We are building on many years of previous past works, and it is part of a broader biolink plan with Upper Campaspe Landcare Network, Central Victorian Biolinks and the Macedon Ranges Shire Council. Human impacts over the last 150 years have resulted in a loss of biodiversity and the introduction of these endangered species back into private and public land, such as here at the Rock, is one more small step towards restoring biodiversity.” said Newham and District Landcare member Penny Roberts, seen here with Hanging Rock Environmental Officer Daniel Young

As a result of funding from the State Government, Newham and District Landcare group is propagating and planting the nationally endangered Basalt Peppercress and the Matted Flax Lily. The two species are just some of over 7000 plants that are being grown and planted by volunteers as part of the Cobaw Biolink project on 8 private properties as well as public land.

Read more about the project here:  protecting-precious-species/

SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES SUCCESS

Spotlight on Species is a joint project between UCLN and the Macedon Shire Council Environmental Officer to conduct Citizen Science surveys looking for three threatened species in the area and to enter resultant data into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas.The two year  project is finishing in June, so if you would like a chance to see a Greater Glider or Powerful Owl click on spotlight-on-species/ and scroll through the calender to pick a date that suits.

Thanks to the wonderful Brad Blake, the threatened species officer employed for the project, we have some great results:

  • 26 phascogales,
  • 47 Greater gliders,
  • 14 Powerful Owls,
  • 71 Spotlights completed,
  • 27 properties installed with remote cameras with more than 12,000 camera trap hours,
  • 542 observations added to Victorian Biodiversity Atlas from Spotlights,
  • 428 observations added to VBA from camera trapping surveys (total of 984 records added to VBA’s as result of SOS project to date).

REMOTE CAMERA TRAINING

Like to learn what critters are on your patch? Contact the UCLN Threatened Species Officer  Brad Blake on 0421823998 or brad@proconpest.com

A component of the Spotlight on Species grant is teaching interested groups how to use the remote sensing cameras.They are fantastic for discovering what lives in your patch and can help motivate members to look after it.The UCLN has ten camera’s and interested groups can contact Brad Blake on 0421823998 or brad@proconpest.com for more details on how to become involved.

PIPERS CREEK LANDCARE CHOOK WORKSHOP

Learn all about how to care for chickens at this great Pipers Creek Landcare event.

Would you like to enjoy fresh eggs, warm from the chook yard, and have lots of great fertilizer for your garden but dont know where to start when it comes to raising chickens? This workshop being run by Pipers Creek Landcare will give you all the answers.More info about the day here: chooks-in-my-back-yard/

CHOOKS ~ IN MY BACK YARD
Sunday 24 March 11.30 am 2019 
Kyneton Showgrounds
Sausage sizzle at noon
More info piperscreeklandcare@gmail.com or 0448 401 372 rsvp by 20th March

UCLN NOW ON INSTAGRAM

New UCLN Committee member Nat Cursio and son Coen.

Thanks to our new UCLN Committee member Nat Cursio we now have our very own Instagram account.You can find it here : https://www.instagram.com/upper_campaspe_landcare/

Nat is a member of Trentham and District Landcare and the Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves and is doing a Bachelor of Environmental and Conservation Science at Federation University in Mt. Helen.

We also welcome new committee members from Glenlyon Upper Loddon Landcare group Joy Durston and Margret Lockwood, who bring with them a wealth of knowledge in working with community and Landcare.

SOIL MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP

Our popular Soil Management workshop is booked out, with many on the waiting list.For those of you interested in reading about it so you can get in quick next time if interested, click here :

soil-scientists-share-knowledge/

EVENTS

AUSTRALIA’S GREAT WILDLIFE MIGRATIONS

YOU, ME AND BIODIVERSITY

WOMBAT FOREST CARE is running a workshop on re vegetation practices presented by David Millsom 
Saturday 27 April, 1.30 – 3 pm Trentham Neighbourhood Centre
David is widely regarded as one of the most experienced and successful revegetation practitioners in Australia .He is now retired and is keen to pass his knowledge to community members who want to improve their outcomes from revegetation.

The talk will cover :-The reasons (“Drivers”) for and development of large scale revegetation techniques. Site preparation for transplanted nursery grown seedlings and Direct Seeding.

Site selection.

Species selection – what plant and why.
Provenance, origin of term and what genetics are telling us.
Seed treatments. Overview of how to maximise germination. Use of smoke, heat, cold and other methods.
Research, development and application of live bacteria inoculant for native legumes.
How to maximise chance of success in a drying and hotter climate.

More info and bookings at :info@wombatforestcare.org.au

THE REMARKABLE WORLD OF WILD ORCHIDS

Newstead Landcare are delighted to present a talk by Emily Noble on ‘The remarkable world of wild orchids’ at 8.00pm on Thursday 21st March at Newstead Community Centre.

Secretary of the Field Naturalists’ Club of Ballarat, Business Manager of the Ballarat Environment Network, Coordinator of the 540ha Clarkesdale Bird Sanctuary in Linton for Birdlife Australia, and proud owner of a bush block south-west of Ballarat that is home to at least fifty different wild orchids, Emily has ample opportunity to pursue her interest in orchids and their interactions with the co-habitants of their environment.

Come along to learn more about these remarkable plants and their fascinating relationships with their world.

All are welcome to Emily’s presentation and supper afterwards. There will be no business meeting to sit through. Gold coin donation.

BIODIVERSITY ACROSS THE BORDERS CONFERENCE

What: This one-day Climate Change and Future Landscapes, conference aims to communicate new ecological research to natural resource managers, the research community and those with an interest in better environmental management.

When: Friday 14 June
Where: Mt. Helen Campus of Federation University, Ballarat.More info: biodiversity-across-the-borders
Register: register
Contact: Assoc. Prof. Singarayer Florentine, s.florentine@federation.edu.au

NEXT SPOTLIGHT WITH UCLN THREATENED SPECIES OFFICER

Like to see a greater glider and learn how to protect their habitat? Why not join in the next UCLN Spotlight?

The next UCLN spotlighting event is on Saturday the 27th April at  Kangaroo Creek,Spring Hill. Dont miss out! Book at link below.
spotlight-survey-tickets-55551145973

HEALTHY COLIBAN CATCHMENT CITIZEN SCIENTIST OPPORTUNITY

Do you live near the Coliban River?Would you like to be involved in a NCCMA Citizen Science project to help look after it?If so have a look at the attached flyer to find out how.

CONNECTING COUNTRY INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

“Online tools for accessing and sharing Biodiversity Information”
The interactive workshop will cover two important databases in detail:
– State Wide Integrated Flora and Fauna Teams (SWIFFT): a knowledge sharing network for biodiversity conservation and threatened species
– Visualising Victoria’s Biodiversity (VVB) – a web portal containing spatial information on environmental values, conservation a…

This is a free interactive event that will explore ways to improve knowledge sharing and access to biodiversity data sets.

WHEN:22 March 2019 9:30 AM to 2.30pm
WHERE:Buda Historic Home & Garden 42 Hunter Street, Castlemaine

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/BBHVW

YOUTH ENGAGEMENT TRAINING WORKSHOP

A training workshop to help get more young people involved in landscape management will be held on Monday 6 May (9am to 4.30pm) at the Melbourne Museum in Carlton, Victoria. The workshop is free and is  hosted by Ag Vic (as part of the Weeds and Rabbits Project) to support youth participation in invasive species management. Members of Friends groups and others involved in natural resources management are welcome to attend.

You can find more information on the workshop here and register your interest in attending here. If you’re unable to access the online form, or would prefer to submit via hard copy or email, please contact Lauren Hull at lauren.hull@ecodev.vic.gov.au. There is also a survey you can complete to help plan the workshop here.

RESOURCES

Landcare notes: Managing a successful group:

– https://www.landcarevic.org.au/resources/landcare-notes-managing-a-successful-group/

Resources for Landcare and Community Groups’ (NCCMA website.)  – https://www.necma.vic.gov.au/Solutions/Landcare-Community-Groups/Group-Resources

MARCH NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

March 2019 edition of the North Central Chat featuring some great upcoming events and funding opportunities.

RABBIT CONTROL RESOURCES

Struggling to control rabbits on your property? Victorian Rabbit Action Network has some Rabbit Management Resources for landholders that may help.Also technical guides and information:

PestSmart – European rabbit: Technical and background information on rabbit control.

Peri-urban rabbit control: Advice on integrated rabbit control methods for urban and semi-urban areas.

Rural rabbit control: Advice on integrated rabbit control methods for rural and natural landscapes.

Rabbit Scan: To record and view rabbit activity in your local area. #VRAN

For details click on the link below:

https://rabbitaction.com/further-resources/

LANDCARE AUSTRALIA’S LANDLINK

Click on link below to read the latest Landlink

https://us1.campaign-archive.com/…

CLIMATE CHANGE -FUTURE PROOF YOUR LANDSCAPE

Connecting Country has some great resources on biodiversity and climate change  relevant to
environments across Victoria.
Future Proof Your Landscape Resources:
education-resources/take-action/

VICTORIAN LANDCARE MAGAZINE

– Stories Sought for Winter 2019 Issue –
Landcare and Health Feature
Copy Deadline: Thursday 21 March
What: The winter 2019 issue of the Victorian Landcare magazine will feature stories on Landcare and
health. Stories are sought on all aspects of health including group health, physical health, mental health, and of course the heath of the environment we are working to protect, enhance and restore.
Story ideas: The magazine fills up very quickly so please contact the editor as early as possible (i.e. well before
the contribution deadline) to discuss your story ideas.
Send your stories to: Carrie Tiffany, Editor, Victorian Landcare magazine via
email: editorviclandcare@gmail.com

WHY YOUR RE VEGETATION WORK MATTERS

An interesting read to inspire you to keep planting!
Small isolated patches of vegetation are more important than you think –
As habitat fragmentation continues to impact landscapes globally, conservation decisions often focus around maintaining large patches of native vegetation. Based on island biogeography theory, bigger patches should be more important, with higher species richness and http://conservationcorridor.org/…/small-isolated-patches-a…/

ORANGE HAWK WEED FOUND IN REGION

Keep an eye out for orange hawkweed. This state-prohibited weed, which is notable for its bright orange flower, has been spotted in the Daylesford, Trentham and Blackwood regions.

If you suspect orange hawkweed do not attempt to remove it. Agriculture Victoria will treat, remove and dispose of the weed at no cost to the landholder.

Report suspected plants to Agriculture Victoria on 136 186 or email weedspotters@ecodev.vic.gov.au

Read more here: https://buff.ly/2twfGjW

GRANTS

Keep your eye out for grant opportunities.

 THE COMMUNITIES ENVIRONMENT PROGRAM

A new small grants program –The Communities Environment Program will provide up to $150,000 to each Federal electorate in 2019-20 for community-led projects that deliver real environmental benefits. Please contact your local member for more information. http://ow.ly/3aFm50mwutP

COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION GRANTS

The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning Community Climate Change Adaptation (3CA) Grants program closes March 31st
The 3CA Grants program provides funding for local communities to adapt to climate change impacts in their region of Victoria. Grants between $25,000 and $75,000 are available. More info, click on link: community-climate-ch…

Frequently Asked Questions below:

3CA-Grant-FAQs-Part-II.pdf

NEED HELP WITH A VICTORIAN LANDCARE GRANT APPLICATION?

Tess Grieves from NCCMA can help your groups with workshops to support grant applications in May .

The workshops can be tailored but to be practical she will focus on;

  • Short presentation of tips related to applying for the CMA’s Victorian Landcare Grants program
  • Discussion time to answer FAQ’s
  • Work through iMap queries

During workshops, it would be out of scope for her to;

  • Read / assess a draft application
  • Assist people to complete an application during the workshop
  • Assist with grants related to other funding streams

So… BOOK HER IN! and share this opportunity with your committee & your groups!    Tess is always keen to get out there and support you.  (03) 5440 1890   0438 357 874

NOVEMBER 2018

 

“NATURE IS THE LIFEBLOOD OF OUR SOCIETY, IF WE SIMPLY DESTROY IT WHEN IT GETS IN OUR WAY, WE WILL PAY THE PRICE.”

David Attenborough

 

Welcome to the Spring issue of our ENews. Spring is always the busiest time for our Landcare community. I hope you enjoy reading this issue, or just getting an idea of the activities in our area by looking at the photos.

  • PLATYPUS PROJECT BEGINS
  • UCLN WINS ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARD
  • ENDANGERED BASALT PEPPERCRESS PLANTING
  • SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE
  • DJA DJA WURRUNG STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT UCLN PROJECTS
  • VEAC FINDINGS
  • UCLN AGM
  • EVENTS, RESOURCES AND GRANTS

 

PLATYPUS PROJECT BEGINS.

As a result of successful funding from a Biodiversity On Ground Action grant, the UCLN is embarking on a year long project to detect Platypus and Blackfish in the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers using cutting edge DNA technology, with the help of Citizen Scientists.The project was launched on the banks of the Campaspe River on Friday 26th October with over 130 people attending.

With the delightful sound of poddlebonk frogs calling from the river around them, people learned  how they could contribute to the project. Representatives from Coliban Water, DEWLP, MRSC, HSC, NCCMA, Councillors, MRSC Mayor and our MP Mary-Anne Thomas all showed their support for the project by attending.

We will be working with EnviroDNA’s Senior Wildlife Ecologist and platypus expert Josh Griffiths. EnviroDNA pioneered the development of the eDNA technique for detecting platypus.They are the only scientists worldwide who have successfully detected platypus in the wild using this technology. They have tested over 1000 sites nationwide testing positive for hundreds.

Senior wildlife ecologist and platypus expert Josh Griffiths takes one of the first water samples for the project with Lana Hughes from Kyneton Secondary College.©Scheltema

“This project will allow local citizen scientists to collect comprehensive data across the UCLN region and contribute to a national assessment of platypuses, the largest platypus survey ever undertaken.” said Josh.

All resulting data will be logged into the Australian Biodiversity Atlas. At the end of the year long project, a planning blueprint will be produced highlighting where platypus and blackfish are living along the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers.This will be provided to land managers to assist with platypus conservation efforts.

Kyneton Secondary College students, who are already working with two of our member groups -the CRLMG and FOBH, will be involved in the water sampling, as well as two Primary Schools.

Keep an eye on our Facebook page  https://www.facebook.com and the Platypus Project page on our website  /the-platypus-project/ for details on when we will be conducting the Citizen Science water sampling events next year.You can also learn more on EnviroDNA’s facebook site https://www.facebook.com/platypusSPOT/ 

You can read some media  about the project here: https://www.hepburnadvocate.com.au/story/

 

UCLN WINS ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARD

I am very pleased to announce that the UCLN was the winner of the 2018 Victorian Regional Achievement and Community Awards.We won the Parks Victoria Environmental Sustainability Award.This is great recognition for our 900 volunteers who work tirelessly to protect our beautiful part of the world.Well done everyone! Click here  Video of awards.to see a video of the award being announced on the night.

 

ENDANGERED BASALT PEPPERCRESS PLANTING

A Trentham Primary School Student with the nationally endangered Basalt Peppercress plant.
©Scheltema

 

Fifty excited enthusiastic students at Trentham Primary school helped plant, fence, tag and monitor 32 nationally endangered Basalt Peppercress (Lepidium hyssopifolium) plants in a new native garden at the school. Known as the Rock and Roll stars of the plant kingdom, because they are short lived and party hard, the plants can be difficult to grow.

The students will be taking stewardship of these special plants to be part of state-wide efforts to prevent them from becoming extinct. There are thought to be only about 500 Basalt Peppercress plants left in Victoria.

Trentham Landcare member Gael Elliott found one growing on the steps of the old lolly shop on the main street of Trentham, and seeds were propagated from that plant. Trentham District Primary School, in conjunction with Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves, Upper Campaspe Landcare Network and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning will be growing the plants at the school to try and increase their population.

Students from Trentham and District Primary School prepare to plant the Nationally Endangered Basalt Peppercress.The students will be taking stewartship of these special plants so as to be part of State-wide efforts to prevent them from becoming extinct.©Scheltema

Said 10-year-old Coen, one of the students involved in the planting “The human race has done a pretty good job of stifling the biodiversity on Planet Earth. So many species have gone extinct, and hundreds are classified as endangered. We can’t let any more get the extinction treatment, even if the species in question is a non-descript weed like plant.”

 

 

SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE

 

A Powerful Owl holding its prey of possum.Pic Gayle Osborne.

The UCLN’s Spotlight on Species Project, underway for a year now  is a great success, with many people seeing Powerful Owls, Greater Gliders and Phascogales for the first time and lots of important data being uploaded to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas.So far there have been:

  • 61 Surveys for Greater Gliders and Powerful Owls, with twenty of these including the public
  • 47 camera traps deployed across 22 properties
  • 24 phascogales recorded
  • 19 greater gliders recorded
  • 9 Powerful Owls recorded
  • 350 sightings from remote sensing cameras added to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas
  • 160 observations made during spotlights added to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas

If your groups would like DL brochures on the three species for members please contact me and I can provide them to you.

The next two spotlights are on  the 10th November at Camels Hump, near Mt Macedon (book here /spotlight-at-camels-hump-mount… ) or on the 17th November at Spring Hill (book here spotlight-at-mudlark-road-womb…) 

Keep an eye on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/ or on our Spotlight on Species Page on the website /spotlight-on-species/  to see the calendar of dates and booking links for future spotlights (next three months coming soon!)

Like to know what animals are in your patch? Contact the UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake to have a remote camera installed. ©Scheltema

 

As a result of another successful grant application from the Macedon Ranges Shire Council we have now added five more remote sensing cameras to our collection.If your group or members are interested in having our threatened species officer Brad Blake set up the cameras on your patch, please contact him on brad@proconpest.com or 0421823998.

We hope to train interested groups in the use of the cameras so they can be rotated amongst our member groups in the future.

 

DJA DJA WURRUNG STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT UCLN PROJECTS

Trentham Landcare member Gael Elliott points out to Dja Dja Wurrung youth Annalise Varker hollows in trees during the Aboriginal Youth Culture Strengthening Program. UCLN was invited to explain the Spotlight on Species Project to the students as part of their program to increase the students’s conservation and land management skills. ©Scheltema

 

The UCLN was thrilled to be invited to talk about their Citizen Science Projects –Spotlight on Species and The Platypus Project to  Dja Dja Wurrung Youth as part of the Aboriginal Youth Culture Strengthening Program.The on country field trips, run by Bendigo Tafe in partnership with Dja Dja Wurrung elders and Parks Victoria, were conducted at culturally significant sites (such as Trentham Falls) and community legacy projects to teach the students about traditional knowledge, cultural leadership and conservation and land management skills.

The students learnt about the three focal endangered species that are part of the Spotlight on Species Project -Powerful Owls, Phasocgales and Greater Gliders, their habitat requirements, threats and actions that can be undertaken to protect them. They also learnt about the work being undertaken by the Network in conjunction with scientists to conduct DNA testing for platypus along the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers.

 

Dja Dja Wurrung Youth Tahrina learnt about UCLN’s Spotlight On Species project as part of the Aboriginal Youth Culture Strengthening Program,a partnership with Bendigo Tafe, Dja Dja Wurrung Elders and Parks Victoria. ©Scheltema

 

 

VEAC FINDINGS

 

Many of you will remember UCLN wrote a submission to the VEAC Central West investigation recommending that the Wombat and Cobaw State Forests be reclassified as State Parks to protect the high conservation values within them. The investigation includes the Wombat and Cobaw State Forests and recommends that the Wombat State Forest be reclassifies as a combination of regional, national and conservation parks. The Cobaw State Forest is recommended to become a conservation park.

The VEAC report noted “Good numbers of greater glider are being recorded in the wetter forests of the central Wombat ranges;this constitutes the only population of this threatened species west of the Hume Highway. The presence of breeding Powerful Owls is significant, as this species requires very extensive areas of forest to provide an adequate food source of possums and gliders…”

We are proud our data from the Spotlight on Species Project, which is entered into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas is contributing to a greater understanding of these species. As Wombat Forest Care states “A primary purpose of a National Park is to protect biodiversity and act as a refuge for threatened species and we have long known that the Wombat, which forms a significant part of the only intact native vegetation in central Victoria fulfills this role.It is gratifying to see this acknowledged by VEAC.”

Support is shown for the VEAC recommendations for a combination of national, regional, and conservation parks for the Wombat State Forest in a gully on the outskirts of Trentham.©Scheltema

In 2017 , Vic Forests intended to recommence saw log harvesting in the Wombat Forest.This is on hold until the VEAC inquiry is completed, but without the protection of a park structure, the Wombat will again be logged potentially threatening the many endangered species within.

The draft report is open for public comment until 10th December, with final recommendations due in March 2019.

The draft proposal paper can be downloaded from

http://www.veac.vic.gov.au/investigation/central-west-investigation

If you or your group make a submission you may want to consider the points below:

Protection of very high biodiversity conservation values including

  • threatened fauna species such as Greater Gliders, Powerful Owls and Brush-tailed Phascogales
  • threatened flora species such as the Wombat Leafless Bossiaea
  • a remarkable fungal diversity with over 400 fungus species
  • habitat of migratory birds that come to the Wombat to breed in spring
  • the Wombat Forest is and will be a important climate change refuge for many species
  • Protection from sawlog harvesting and mining.Protection of water production and supply – headwaters of six rivers

You can make a submission here: http://www.veac.vic.gov.au/submit . 

If you are interested in making a submission and need help you may like to attend the workshop below.

 

 

 

 

UCLN AGM

 

WHEN: Thursday 22 November 2018 6-7 pm meal. AGM 7.00 pm sharp

WHERE:Albion Hotel, Mollison Street, Kyneton

Cass Davis who runs the WaterWatch program will be speaking on the night.

Please RSVP to Hanne secretary@uppercampaspelandcare.org.au by close of business Monday, 19 November.

Nominations for Office Bearers and Committee Members

Members are invited to submit nominations for Office Bearers and Ordinary Committee Members of the Association for the forthcoming term. Nominations must be for a specific office or for a position of ordinary committee member. At the meeting, the Chairperson will call for nominations prior to the election for each position. Eligible members may nominate themselves or, with the member’s consent, be nominated by another member. Nominations may be submitted in writing and must reach the Secretary prior to the commencement of the meeting. Each nomination must include the consent of the nominee to stand for election to office.

Please note that an Authorised Representative may be any member from their Member Group as long as their membership is current. They do not have to be one of their Group’s Committee Office Bearers or Ordinary Committee members.

 

 

ARTICLE BY CENTRAL VICTORIA BIOLINKS ALLIANCE RE ANIMALS AT RISK OF EXTINCTION IN CENTRAL VICTORIA .

You may wish to read this interesting article in the Bendigo paper re animals at risk of extinction in Central Victoria.

Data shows 180 animals at risk in central Victoria as groups call for urgent action on ‘extinction crisis’ central-victoria-to-curb-extinction-crisis/

 

 

LIVING WITH FIRE AND BIODIVERSITY

 

How do you protect your property from bushfire but still provide habitat for plants and animals?Come along to a special workshop hosted by Woodend Landcare and MRSC on fire and biodiversity. The Victorian CFA Vegetation Team Leader will provide information on:

  • Fire behavior and house blocks
  • Landscaping for bushfire
  • Creating a fire protection zone

Wednesday 14 November, 7.30pm
Woodend Neighbourhood House
47 Forest Street, Woodend

Supper provided.
Bookings required to woodendlandcare@gmail.com

 

HEPBURN SHIRE COUNCIL DRAFT BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY

Some of our groups who fall within the Hepburn Shire have been involved in the draft Hepburn Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan 2018-2021.The latest draft is available here should you wish to read it.Click here to download a copy

The strategy includes an action plan with 13 strategic focus areas and 31 actions intended to provide on ground protection and enhancement of biodiversity, support well informed decision making, increase community awareness and support partnerships to improve biodiversity for future generations.

For more information contact Brian Bainbridge, Biodiversity Officer, on 5321 6488 or email bbainbridge@hepburn.vic.gov.au

 

 

MASC Roadside weeds funding

Mount Alexander Shire Council has recently received funding for roadside weeds. If your group would like to apply for funding to manage roadside weeds in your area, please contact Jarrod at j.coote@mountalexander.vic.gov.au. or  5471 1806  Applications are due by 30 November 2018.

 

Environmental Volunteering Plan

 

On Sunday 14 October, the Hon Lily D’Ambrosio, Minister for Energy, Environment, and Climate Change launched the Victorians Volunteering for Nature: Environmental Volunteering Plan.

Malmsbury Landcare volunteers tackle gorse©Scheltema

The Plan aims to reduce barriers to volunteering in Victoria, and to get more Victorians connecting with nature and acting to protect and enhance the natural environment. It provides a new, coordinated and revitalised approach to environmental volunteering through four focus areas (i.e. sustain, expand, value, & understand) that seek to address the challenges, issues and the changing needs facing the environmental volunteering sector.Read the Plan: to download or read the Environmental Volunteering Plan (and the Plan summary) go to https://www.environment.vic.gov.au/home/victorians-volunteering-for-nature

For further information: on the Environmental Volunteering Plan please email environmental.volunteering@delwp.vic.gov.au

 

MORE LANDCARE NEWS

Click on the following links to download or view other relevant newsletters:
Feral Flyer – Issue #352
October Catchment Connection
Victorian Landcare Magazine –Issue 73

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

Click here for the November issue of the  North Central Chat – NC Chat

 

 

MANAGEMENT OF SERRATED TUSSOCK

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES WORKSHOP.

 

 

JULY 2018

” NO ONE WILL PROTECT WHAT THEY DON’T CARE ABOUT, AND NO ONE WILL CARE ABOUT WHAT THEY HAVE NEVER EXPERIENCED.”

David Attenborough

President of Malmsbury Landcare John Walters and Rob Burdett at Kangaroo Creek,  where their group has conducted extensive gorse control. “It’s a travesty to have this beautiful forest invaded by a rampant weed. It’s displacing native plants which degrades the biodiversity that has existed here for thousands of years.”said Rob, a long term member of Malmsbury and District Landcare                                                                                                                                                              ©Scheltema

Welcome to the Winter issue of our ENews. At the UCLN General meeting last week, it was fantastic to see so many groups present and hear about the wonderful work they are doing to protect the natural environment in their area. I hope you enjoy reading about our Citizen Science project to look for threatened species, and the inspiring work some of our member groups are doing.

  • SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE
  • MALMSBURY’S WAR ON GORSE
  • PRISONERS HELP PHASCOGALES
  • TARADALE LANDCARE JOINS THE UCLN
  • NATIONAL TREE PLANTING DAY
  • RIVER GUARDIANS
  • EVENTS, RESOURCES AND GRANTS

SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE

A juvenile Greater Glider found recently on a spotlighting event, part of the UCLN Spotlight on Species Project. Pic Elizabeth Parsons

The UCLN Spotlight on Species Project is now six months underway and is getting great results. As a result of the remote camera trapping and evening spotlights we have now recorded 24 Phascogales, four Powerful Owls and thirteen Greater Gliders. This valuable data has been entered into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas and will help protect the habitat of these precious species. 37 cameras have been deployed at 17 properties over 777 camera trap days with 33 species recorded.

Students from Candlebark school help UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake mark out a 1 km transect in preparation for a evening spotlight to look for greater gliders and powerful owls.                                                                         ©Scheltema

25 – 1 km transects have been surveyed (based on existing VBA records) with 33 Spotlighting events conducted along them resulting in 25 species recorded in the VBA. Many people have attended the spotlights and got great joy out of seeing the iconic greater gliders for the first time.

If your Landcare group or members would like the UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake to install remote cameras to look for species such as phascogales please contact him on  0421823998 or brad@proconpest.com. You can see the dates of upcoming Spotlighting Events by clicking on Spotlight on Species and scrolling down to the monthly calender’s.

Young Rowan learns about remote sensing cameras with UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake.  ©Scheltema

If you would like to learn more about this project click here to read an article in the latest Victorian Landcare Magazine.

UCLN Citizen Science Project

MALMBURY AND DISTRICT  LANDCARE’S  WAR ON GORSE

Malmsbury and District Landcare group is continuing its tenacious War on Gorse.The Coliban River flats at Lauriston are badly overgrown by gorse, blackberry and willow which is  negatively impacting upon the stream banks and water quality.

Malmsbury Landcare member Jan Taylor and President John Walters on the Coliban River. The group will be conducting extensive weed control to improve the health of the river.                                                                                             ©Scheltema

The Malmsbury group’s project RIVER RECOVERY – LINKING LAURISTON TO THE RESERVOIR aims to address the problem by removing the weeds -“for the benefit of all residents, whether human or wildlife.It is viewed by Malmsbury Landcare as a long term project” said President John Walters. The group  received a Upper Coliban Landcare support grant of $30,000 from the NCCMA – designed to support the UCLN Coliban Connections Biolink Project- to undertake the important work. Tylden Landcare and the Friends Of Trentham Creeks and Reserves also received funds as part of this project to continue improving river health on the Coliban River and it’s  tributaries.

President of Malmsbury and District Landcare John Walters (with members Jan Taylor, Sue Walter and Rob Burdett) said “We have been aware of this weed problem for many years, and wanted to address it as part of the  Coliban Connections  which is one of the UCLN biolink projects. It’s part of our long term vision to improve the health of the Coliban River between the Malmsbury Reservoir and Lauriston Reserve.” ©Scheltema

The group has also undertaken extensive weed control at Kangaroo Creek.“What we have here is a ecological vegetation class (EVC) creek line herb rich woodland classified as vulnerable.One of the things we are trying to protect in Biodiversity terms is the EVC .Weeds like gorse choke out the vegetation and create a fire risk.We have records of powerful owls and greater gliders here, we need to remove the gorse to remove threat of fire.Whatever we do to improve the biodiversity here will improve the habitat of the powerful owls and greater gliders.”

President of Malmsbury and District Landcare  John Walter with Rob Burdett at Kangaroo Creek, which is a EVC herb rich woodland listed as vulnerable. The group is undertaking gorse control in the area to protect it.  ©Scheltema

PRISONERS HELP PHASCOGALES

Phascogales in the Barfold area will soon be getting new homes thanks to inmates at Middleton Prison, Castlemaine. The inmates have been hard at work constructing 20 nest boxes for the Campaspe Valley Landcare group suitable for the phascogales, a threatened species found in Central Victoria.
The distinctive small creatures, known as ‘Duan’ by the Dja Dja Wurrung people tap their feet when alarmed, and wag their tails when excited. They were found recently near Barfold as a result of the UCLN Spotlight on Species Project.

President of Campaspe Valley Landcare Jan Elder finds a suitable spot to install a remote sensing camera with UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake.   ©Scheltema

President of Campaspe Valley Landcare Jan Elder said “We were thrilled to find images of phascogales on the remote sensing cameras that the UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake installed. The woodlands and dry forests of Central Victoria were once a stronghold for these threatened species, but their numbers have declined over the last century mainly due to land clearing and cats and foxes.” 
“Our group hopes that by installing these nest boxes, kindly built for us by the Middleton Prison inmates, we will be helping to increase their chances of survival in our area.”  

Acting Vocational Services Manager at  Middleton Prison Peter Foti said “By building these boxes, as part of our recycling and environment program, inmates are being given a chance to contribute to society in a meaningful way,  whilst being able to utilize existing or learn new skills. It is great to know that these boxes they have constructed will be helping local threatened species survive.”                                                                                                                                              ©Scheltema

A recent genetic analysis of 435 phascogale tissue samples, four from the Kyneton area, concludes that fragmentation of populations is probably causing limited gene flow.This illustrates the  need for better connections in the landscape which is why biolink projects such as those undertaken by the UCLN and its member groups are so important.

TARADALE LANDCARE JOINS THE UCLN

We are  very pleased to welcome Taradale Landcare as the latest group to join the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network.

The UCLN is thrilled to have Taradale Landcare join the Network. Some of the group members are seen here at Back Creek, a tributary of the Coliban River, in an area they have been restoring. L -R Colleen Jones, Lyn Shill, Christine Henderson and Brian Bainbridge.                                                                                                                        ©Scheltema

The group is working along Back Creek, a tributary of the Coliban River. “Our primary goal has been to revisit Back Creek, which runs through the town, and rejuvenate the work of the earlier Landcare volunteers. We are removing woody weed regrowth and extending and diversifying planting. I just noticed we had a white-throated tree creeper feeding on a tree planted ten years ago. It takes that long for the tree to grow tall and wide enough to become suitable habitat for these birds.”

The group is hoping that by clearing and removing willows and other weeds the creek should flow again, and once again be a place for swimming and platypus as it  was previously. Taradale Primary School is also regularly involved in planting days and uses the creek as an open classroom.

Taradale Landcare secretary  Colleen Jones, seen here with member Brian Bainbridge, said “As well as restoring the health of the creek we’d like to inspire visitors and residents with the beauty and diversity of our local flora and fauna.”                                                                  ©Scheltema

In addition the group is working on roadside weed removal with funds provided by Mt Alexander Shire Council. This work is being undertaken at three sites of high biodiversity values that are leading into the forest along the edges of Fryers Ridge Conservation Reserve.

Taradale Landcare members on the look out for weeds encroaching into the Fryers Ridge Conservation Reserve.    ©Scheltema

NATIONAL TREE PLANTING DAY WITH CAMPASPE RIVER AND LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP

Why not join in with the CRLM group along the Campaspe River in Kyneton on National Tree Day Sunday 29th July to help revegetate the river?

Like to be involved in National Tree Day Sunday 29th July? Why not help CRLM group plant trees and shrubs such as the River Bottle Brush.

National Tree Day is Australia’s largest tree planting day. It started in 1996 and since then more than four million people have planted over 24 million trees and plants with the aim of caring for our land.

WHERE: The River end of Jennings St Kyneton (look for the CRLM trailer)

WHEN: 10 am  – 12 pm Sunday 29th July 

WHY: To help the CRLM group plant out trees and shrubs such as the River Bottle Brush.

Morning tea is provided.Wear gumboots, gloves and warm clothes. Tools and a delicious morning tea provided.

RIVER GUARDIANS

River Guardians on the Campaspe River at Carlsruhe                                                ©Scheltema

Wild and windy weather didn’t deter prospective River Guardians from walking along the Campaspe River at Carlsruhe  at a UCLN River Restoration Field Day in May. 32  people braved the elements to learn from 6 experts in the field how to restore river health. They were inspired by award winning river ecologists such as Damien Cook to protect the rivers and wetlands in their area and learnt some of the skills that would help them do so.

GRANTS

Apply before 20 July to ensure your school or group is in the running to secure a $5,000 grant! 

A preschooler learns about the endangered Hairy Anchor plant in Kyneton.                                 ©Scheltema

Exciting news for Victorian schools, kindergartens, childcare centres, Scouts, Girl Guides and youth groups that are interested in working on a Junior Landcare biodiversity project in 2018-19. The Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning in partnership with Landcare Australia is giving your school or group the opportunity to apply for a grant of up to $5,000 (excl GST) as part of the Victorian Junior Landcare and Biodiversity Grants. Apply now

EVENTS

2018 NATIONAL LANDCARE CONFERENCE AND AWARDS

Like to learn about all things Landcare? Then head up to  Brisbane for the 2018 National Landcare Conference

The early bird catches the worm. The 2018 National Landcare Conference and Awards is your opportunity to contribute to, engage with, and learn from your community and peers. Over three days, you will have the opportunity to be inspired by keynote speakers and informative presentations, take part in fun social events, and experience educational field trips.

Early bird registration closes 31 July 2018. REGISTER HERE

RESOURCES

 WINTER LANDCARE MAGAZINE
Issue 72 of the Victorian Landcare and Catchment Management magazine, which is a feature on Landcare and research is now available online. 

Among the stories in issue 72 are stories on: vegetation quality assessment by smart phone, citizen science, the social return on investment in Landcare projects, alternative fertiliser trials, and gorse and cactus bio control.

To read this issue of the magazine online (via Victorian Landcare Gateway) go to https://www.landcarevic.org.au/landcare-magazine/winter-2018/

To download the PDF version of this issue (and back issues) of the magazine and to access the magazine’s index go to https://www.landcarevic.org.au/resources/magazine-library/
This issue features our Networks Spotlight on Species Project and is mentioned by the Minister in the introduction. Direct link to story here:

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT July 2018

Click here to read the North Central ChatNorth Central Chat July 18

WOMBAT FORESTCARE NEWSLETTER JUNE 18

If you are interested in fungi you must read the latest beautiful newsletter from  Wombat Forest Care.

WFCNewsletterJune18

SERRATED TUSSOCK SIGNS AVAILABLE FOR FREE

The VSTWP have a number of Serrated Tussock Landowner Signs available for ‘Community Champions’ of Serrated Tussock management in Victoria. The signs are designed to be attached to landowner fences that face a roadside, and help the community deliver key messages on controlling this noxious weed.
If you would like to order a number of the these signs, please email  Executive Officer Martin Deering and he can post them out to you for free:
AUSTRALIAN TAXATION OFFICE HELP SHEET ON SHELTER BELTS.

ATO help sheet: Establishing shelterbelts on land used in a primary production business

https://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/view.htm?docid=AFS/ShelterBelts&PiT=99991231235958