NOVEMBER 2018

 

“NATURE IS THE LIFEBLOOD OF OUR SOCIETY, IF WE SIMPLY DESTROY IT WHEN IT GETS IN OUR WAY, WE WILL PAY THE PRICE.”

David Attenborough

 

Welcome to the Spring issue of our ENews. Spring is always the busiest time for our Landcare community. I hope you enjoy reading this issue, or just getting an idea of the activities in our area by looking at the photos.

  • PLATYPUS PROJECT BEGINS
  • UCLN WINS ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARD
  • ENDANGERED BASALT PEPPERCRESS PLANTING
  • SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE
  • DJA DJA WURRUNG STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT UCLN PROJECTS
  • VEAC FINDINGS
  • UCLN AGM
  • EVENTS, RESOURCES AND GRANTS

 

PLATYPUS PROJECT BEGINS.

As a result of successful funding from a Biodiversity On Ground Action grant, the UCLN is embarking on a year long project to detect Platypus and Blackfish in the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers using cutting edge DNA technology, with the help of Citizen Scientists.The project was launched on the banks of the Campaspe River on Friday 26th October with over 130 people attending.

With the delightful sound of poddlebonk frogs calling from the river around them, people learned  how they could contribute to the project. Representatives from Coliban Water, DEWLP, MRSC, HSC, NCCMA, Councillors, MRSC Mayor and our MP Mary-Anne Thomas all showed their support for the project by attending.

We will be working with EnviroDNA’s Senior Wildlife Ecologist and platypus expert Josh Griffiths. EnviroDNA pioneered the development of the eDNA technique for detecting platypus.They are the only scientists worldwide who have successfully detected platypus in the wild using this technology. They have tested over 1000 sites nationwide testing positive for hundreds.

Senior wildlife ecologist and platypus expert Josh Griffiths takes one of the first water samples for the project with Lana Hughes from Kyneton Secondary College.©Scheltema

“This project will allow local citizen scientists to collect comprehensive data across the UCLN region and contribute to a national assessment of platypuses, the largest platypus survey ever undertaken.” said Josh.

All resulting data will be logged into the Australian Biodiversity Atlas. At the end of the year long project, a planning blueprint will be produced highlighting where platypus and blackfish are living along the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers.This will be provided to land managers to assist with platypus conservation efforts.

Kyneton Secondary College students, who are already working with two of our member groups -the CRLMG and FOBH, will be involved in the water sampling, as well as two Primary Schools.

Keep an eye on our Facebook page  https://www.facebook.com and the Platypus Project page on our website  /the-platypus-project/ for details on when we will be conducting the Citizen Science water sampling events next year.You can also learn more on EnviroDNA’s facebook site https://www.facebook.com/platypusSPOT/ 

You can read some media  about the project here: https://www.hepburnadvocate.com.au/story/

 

UCLN WINS ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARD

I am very pleased to announce that the UCLN was the winner of the 2018 Victorian Regional Achievement and Community Awards.We won the Parks Victoria Environmental Sustainability Award.This is great recognition for our 900 volunteers who work tirelessly to protect our beautiful part of the world.Well done everyone! Click here  Video of awards.to see a video of the award being announced on the night.

 

ENDANGERED BASALT PEPPERCRESS PLANTING

A Trentham Primary School Student with the nationally endangered Basalt Peppercress plant.
©Scheltema

 

Fifty excited enthusiastic students at Trentham Primary school helped plant, fence, tag and monitor 32 nationally endangered Basalt Peppercress (Lepidium hyssopifolium) plants in a new native garden at the school. Known as the Rock and Roll stars of the plant kingdom, because they are short lived and party hard, the plants can be difficult to grow.

The students will be taking stewardship of these special plants to be part of state-wide efforts to prevent them from becoming extinct. There are thought to be only about 500 Basalt Peppercress plants left in Victoria.

Trentham Landcare member Gael Elliott found one growing on the steps of the old lolly shop on the main street of Trentham, and seeds were propagated from that plant. Trentham District Primary School, in conjunction with Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves, Upper Campaspe Landcare Network and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning will be growing the plants at the school to try and increase their population.

Students from Trentham and District Primary School prepare to plant the Nationally Endangered Basalt Peppercress.The students will be taking stewartship of these special plants so as to be part of State-wide efforts to prevent them from becoming extinct.©Scheltema

Said 10-year-old Coen, one of the students involved in the planting “The human race has done a pretty good job of stifling the biodiversity on Planet Earth. So many species have gone extinct, and hundreds are classified as endangered. We can’t let any more get the extinction treatment, even if the species in question is a non-descript weed like plant.”

 

 

SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE

 

A Powerful Owl holding its prey of possum.Pic Gayle Osborne.

The UCLN’s Spotlight on Species Project, underway for a year now  is a great success, with many people seeing Powerful Owls, Greater Gliders and Phascogales for the first time and lots of important data being uploaded to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas.So far there have been:

  • 61 Surveys for Greater Gliders and Powerful Owls, with twenty of these including the public
  • 47 camera traps deployed across 22 properties
  • 24 phascogales recorded
  • 19 greater gliders recorded
  • 9 Powerful Owls recorded
  • 350 sightings from remote sensing cameras added to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas
  • 160 observations made during spotlights added to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas

If your groups would like DL brochures on the three species for members please contact me and I can provide them to you.

The next two spotlights are on  the 10th November at Camels Hump, near Mt Macedon (book here /spotlight-at-camels-hump-mount… ) or on the 17th November at Spring Hill (book here spotlight-at-mudlark-road-womb…) 

Keep an eye on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/ or on our Spotlight on Species Page on the website /spotlight-on-species/  to see the calendar of dates and booking links for future spotlights (next three months coming soon!)

Like to know what animals are in your patch? Contact the UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake to have a remote camera installed. ©Scheltema

 

As a result of another successful grant application from the Macedon Ranges Shire Council we have now added five more remote sensing cameras to our collection.If your group or members are interested in having our threatened species officer Brad Blake set up the cameras on your patch, please contact him on brad@proconpest.com or 0421823998.

We hope to train interested groups in the use of the cameras so they can be rotated amongst our member groups in the future.

 

DJA DJA WURRUNG STUDENTS LEARN ABOUT UCLN PROJECTS

Trentham Landcare member Gael Elliott points out to Dja Dja Wurrung youth Annalise Varker hollows in trees during the Aboriginal Youth Culture Strengthening Program. UCLN was invited to explain the Spotlight on Species Project to the students as part of their program to increase the students’s conservation and land management skills. ©Scheltema

 

The UCLN was thrilled to be invited to talk about their Citizen Science Projects –Spotlight on Species and The Platypus Project to  Dja Dja Wurrung Youth as part of the Aboriginal Youth Culture Strengthening Program.The on country field trips, run by Bendigo Tafe in partnership with Dja Dja Wurrung elders and Parks Victoria, were conducted at culturally significant sites (such as Trentham Falls) and community legacy projects to teach the students about traditional knowledge, cultural leadership and conservation and land management skills.

The students learnt about the three focal endangered species that are part of the Spotlight on Species Project -Powerful Owls, Phasocgales and Greater Gliders, their habitat requirements, threats and actions that can be undertaken to protect them. They also learnt about the work being undertaken by the Network in conjunction with scientists to conduct DNA testing for platypus along the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers.

 

Dja Dja Wurrung Youth Tahrina learnt about UCLN’s Spotlight On Species project as part of the Aboriginal Youth Culture Strengthening Program,a partnership with Bendigo Tafe, Dja Dja Wurrung Elders and Parks Victoria. ©Scheltema

 

 

VEAC FINDINGS

 

Many of you will remember UCLN wrote a submission to the VEAC Central West investigation recommending that the Wombat and Cobaw State Forests be reclassified as State Parks to protect the high conservation values within them. The investigation includes the Wombat and Cobaw State Forests and recommends that the Wombat State Forest be reclassifies as a combination of regional, national and conservation parks. The Cobaw State Forest is recommended to become a conservation park.

The VEAC report noted “Good numbers of greater glider are being recorded in the wetter forests of the central Wombat ranges;this constitutes the only population of this threatened species west of the Hume Highway. The presence of breeding Powerful Owls is significant, as this species requires very extensive areas of forest to provide an adequate food source of possums and gliders…”

We are proud our data from the Spotlight on Species Project, which is entered into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas is contributing to a greater understanding of these species. As Wombat Forest Care states “A primary purpose of a National Park is to protect biodiversity and act as a refuge for threatened species and we have long known that the Wombat, which forms a significant part of the only intact native vegetation in central Victoria fulfills this role.It is gratifying to see this acknowledged by VEAC.”

Support is shown for the VEAC recommendations for a combination of national, regional, and conservation parks for the Wombat State Forest in a gully on the outskirts of Trentham.©Scheltema

In 2017 , Vic Forests intended to recommence saw log harvesting in the Wombat Forest.This is on hold until the VEAC inquiry is completed, but without the protection of a park structure, the Wombat will again be logged potentially threatening the many endangered species within.

The draft report is open for public comment until 10th December, with final recommendations due in March 2019.

The draft proposal paper can be downloaded from

http://www.veac.vic.gov.au/investigation/central-west-investigation

If you or your group make a submission you may want to consider the points below:

Protection of very high biodiversity conservation values including

  • threatened fauna species such as Greater Gliders, Powerful Owls and Brush-tailed Phascogales
  • threatened flora species such as the Wombat Leafless Bossiaea
  • a remarkable fungal diversity with over 400 fungus species
  • habitat of migratory birds that come to the Wombat to breed in spring
  • the Wombat Forest is and will be a important climate change refuge for many species
  • Protection from sawlog harvesting and mining.Protection of water production and supply – headwaters of six rivers

You can make a submission here: http://www.veac.vic.gov.au/submit . 

If you are interested in making a submission and need help you may like to attend the workshop below.

 

 

 

 

UCLN AGM

 

WHEN: Thursday 22 November 2018 6-7 pm meal. AGM 7.00 pm sharp

WHERE:Albion Hotel, Mollison Street, Kyneton

Cass Davis who runs the WaterWatch program will be speaking on the night.

Please RSVP to Hanne secretary@uppercampaspelandcare.org.au by close of business Monday, 19 November.

Nominations for Office Bearers and Committee Members

Members are invited to submit nominations for Office Bearers and Ordinary Committee Members of the Association for the forthcoming term. Nominations must be for a specific office or for a position of ordinary committee member. At the meeting, the Chairperson will call for nominations prior to the election for each position. Eligible members may nominate themselves or, with the member’s consent, be nominated by another member. Nominations may be submitted in writing and must reach the Secretary prior to the commencement of the meeting. Each nomination must include the consent of the nominee to stand for election to office.

Please note that an Authorised Representative may be any member from their Member Group as long as their membership is current. They do not have to be one of their Group’s Committee Office Bearers or Ordinary Committee members.

 

 

ARTICLE BY CENTRAL VICTORIA BIOLINKS ALLIANCE RE ANIMALS AT RISK OF EXTINCTION IN CENTRAL VICTORIA .

You may wish to read this interesting article in the Bendigo paper re animals at risk of extinction in Central Victoria.

Data shows 180 animals at risk in central Victoria as groups call for urgent action on ‘extinction crisis’ central-victoria-to-curb-extinction-crisis/

 

 

LIVING WITH FIRE AND BIODIVERSITY

 

How do you protect your property from bushfire but still provide habitat for plants and animals?Come along to a special workshop hosted by Woodend Landcare and MRSC on fire and biodiversity. The Victorian CFA Vegetation Team Leader will provide information on:

  • Fire behavior and house blocks
  • Landscaping for bushfire
  • Creating a fire protection zone

Wednesday 14 November, 7.30pm
Woodend Neighbourhood House
47 Forest Street, Woodend

Supper provided.
Bookings required to woodendlandcare@gmail.com

 

HEPBURN SHIRE COUNCIL DRAFT BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY

Some of our groups who fall within the Hepburn Shire have been involved in the draft Hepburn Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan 2018-2021.The latest draft is available here should you wish to read it.Click here to download a copy

The strategy includes an action plan with 13 strategic focus areas and 31 actions intended to provide on ground protection and enhancement of biodiversity, support well informed decision making, increase community awareness and support partnerships to improve biodiversity for future generations.

For more information contact Brian Bainbridge, Biodiversity Officer, on 5321 6488 or email bbainbridge@hepburn.vic.gov.au

 

 

MASC Roadside weeds funding

Mount Alexander Shire Council has recently received funding for roadside weeds. If your group would like to apply for funding to manage roadside weeds in your area, please contact Jarrod at j.coote@mountalexander.vic.gov.au. or  5471 1806  Applications are due by 30 November 2018.

 

Environmental Volunteering Plan

 

On Sunday 14 October, the Hon Lily D’Ambrosio, Minister for Energy, Environment, and Climate Change launched the Victorians Volunteering for Nature: Environmental Volunteering Plan.

Malmsbury Landcare volunteers tackle gorse©Scheltema

The Plan aims to reduce barriers to volunteering in Victoria, and to get more Victorians connecting with nature and acting to protect and enhance the natural environment. It provides a new, coordinated and revitalised approach to environmental volunteering through four focus areas (i.e. sustain, expand, value, & understand) that seek to address the challenges, issues and the changing needs facing the environmental volunteering sector.Read the Plan: to download or read the Environmental Volunteering Plan (and the Plan summary) go to https://www.environment.vic.gov.au/home/victorians-volunteering-for-nature

For further information: on the Environmental Volunteering Plan please email environmental.volunteering@delwp.vic.gov.au

 

MORE LANDCARE NEWS

Click on the following links to download or view other relevant newsletters:
Feral Flyer – Issue #352
October Catchment Connection
Victorian Landcare Magazine –Issue 73

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

Click here for the November issue of the  North Central Chat – NC Chat

 

 

MANAGEMENT OF SERRATED TUSSOCK

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES WORKSHOP.

 

 

JULY 2018

” NO ONE WILL PROTECT WHAT THEY DON’T CARE ABOUT, AND NO ONE WILL CARE ABOUT WHAT THEY HAVE NEVER EXPERIENCED.”

David Attenborough

President of Malmsbury Landcare John Walters and Rob Burdett at Kangaroo Creek,  where their group has conducted extensive gorse control. “It’s a travesty to have this beautiful forest invaded by a rampant weed. It’s displacing native plants which degrades the biodiversity that has existed here for thousands of years.”said Rob, a long term member of Malmsbury and District Landcare                                                                                                                                                              ©Scheltema

 

Welcome to the Winter issue of our ENews. At the UCLN General meeting last week, it was fantastic to see so many groups present and hear about the wonderful work they are doing to protect the natural environment in their area. I hope you enjoy reading about our Citizen Science project to look for threatened species, and the inspiring work some of our member groups are doing.

  • SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE
  • MALMSBURY’S WAR ON GORSE
  • PRISONERS HELP PHASCOGALES
  • TARADALE LANDCARE JOINS THE UCLN
  • NATIONAL TREE PLANTING DAY
  • RIVER GUARDIANS
  • EVENTS, RESOURCES AND GRANTS

 

SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES UPDATE

 

A juvenile Greater Glider found recently on a spotlighting event, part of the UCLN Spotlight on Species Project. Pic Elizabeth Parsons

The UCLN Spotlight on Species Project is now six months underway and is getting great results. As a result of the remote camera trapping and evening spotlights we have now recorded 24 Phascogales, four Powerful Owls and thirteen Greater Gliders. This valuable data has been entered into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas and will help protect the habitat of these precious species. 37 cameras have been deployed at 17 properties over 777 camera trap days with 33 species recorded.

Students from Candlebark school help UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake mark out a 1 km transect in preparation for a evening spotlight to look for greater gliders and powerful owls.                                                                         ©Scheltema

25 – 1 km transects have been surveyed (based on existing VBA records) with 33 Spotlighting events conducted along them resulting in 25 species recorded in the VBA. Many people have attended the spotlights and got great joy out of seeing the iconic greater gliders for the first time.

If your Landcare group or members would like the UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake to install remote cameras to look for species such as phascogales please contact him on  0421823998 or brad@proconpest.com. You can see the dates of upcoming Spotlighting Events by clicking on Spotlight on Species and scrolling down to the monthly calender’s.

Young Rowan learns about remote sensing cameras with UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake.  ©Scheltema

If you would like to learn more about this project click here to read an article in the latest Victorian Landcare Magazine.

UCLN Citizen Science Project

 

MALMBURY AND DISTRICT  LANDCARE’S  WAR ON GORSE

Malmsbury and District Landcare group is continuing its tenacious War on Gorse.The Coliban River flats at Lauriston are badly overgrown by gorse, blackberry and willow which is  negatively impacting upon the stream banks and water quality.

Malmsbury Landcare member Jan Taylor and President John Walters on the Coliban River.The group will be conducting extensive weed control to improve the health of the river.                                                                                             ©Scheltema

The Malmsbury group’s project RIVER RECOVERY – LINKING LAURISTON TO THE RESERVOIR aims to address the problem by removing the weeds -“for the benefit of all residents, whether human or wildlife.It is viewed by Malmsbury Landcare as a long term project” said President John Walters. The group  received a Upper Coliban Landcare support grant of $30,000 from the NCCMA – designed to support the UCLN Coliban Connections Biolink Project- to undertake the important work. Tylden Landcare and the Friends Of Trentham Creeks and Reserves also received funds as part of this project to continue improving river health on the Coliban River and it’s  tributaries.

President of Malmsbury and District Landcare John Walters (with members Jan Taylor, Sue Walter and Rob Burdett) said “We have been aware of this weed problem for many years, and wanted to address it as part of the  Coliban Connections  which is one of the UCLN biolink projects. It’s part of our long term vision to improve the health of the Coliban River between the Malmsbury Reservoir and Lauriston Reserve.” ©Scheltema

 

The group has also undertaken extensive weed control at Kangaroo Creek.“What we have here is a ecological vegetation class (EVC) creek line herb rich woodland classified as vulnerable.One of the things we are trying to protect in Biodiversity terms is the EVC .Weeds like gorse choke out the vegetation and create a fire risk.We have records of powerful owls and greater gliders here, we need to remove the gorse to remove threat of fire.Whatever we do to improve the biodiversity here will improve the habitat of the powerful owls and greater gliders.”

President of Malmsbury and District Landcare  John Walter with Rob Burdett at Kangaroo Creek, which is a EVC herb rich woodland listed as vulnerable. The group is undertaking gorse control in the area to protect it.  ©Scheltema

 

 

PRISONERS HELP PHASCOGALES

Phascogales in the Barfold area will soon be getting new homes thanks to inmates at Middleton Prison, Castlemaine. The inmates have been hard at work constructing 20 nest boxes for the Campaspe Valley Landcare group suitable for the phascogales, a threatened species found in Central Victoria.
The distinctive small creatures, known as ‘Duan’ by the Dja Dja Wurrung people tap their feet when alarmed, and wag their tails when excited. They were found recently near Barfold as a result of the UCLN Spotlight on Species Project.

President of Campaspe Valley Landcare Jan Elder finds a suitable spot to install a remote sensing camera with UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake.   ©Scheltema

President of Campaspe Valley Landcare Jan Elder said “We were thrilled to find images of phascogales on the remote sensing cameras that the UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake installed. The woodlands and dry forests of Central Victoria were once a stronghold for these threatened species, but their numbers have declined over the last century mainly due to land clearing and cats and foxes.” 
“Our group hopes that by installing these nest boxes, kindly built for us by the Middleton Prison inmates, we will be helping to increase their chances of survival in our area.”  

Acting Vocational Services Manager at  Middleton Prison Peter Foti said “By building these boxes, as part of our recycling and environment program, inmates are being given a chance to contribute to society in a meaningful way,  whilst being able to utilize existing or learn new skills. It is great to know that these boxes they have constructed will be helping local threatened species survive.”                                                                                                                                              ©Scheltema

A recent genetic analysis of 435 phascogale tissue samples, four from the Kyneton area, concludes that fragmentation of populations is probably causing limited gene flow.This illustrates the  need for better connections in the landscape which is why biolink projects such as those undertaken by the UCLN and its member groups are so important.

 

TARADALE LANDCARE JOINS THE UCLN

We are  very pleased to welcome Taradale Landcare as the latest group to join the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network.

The UCLN is thrilled to have Taradale Landcare join the Network. Some of the group members are seen here at Back Creek, a tributary of the Coliban River, in an area they have been restoring. L -R Colleen Jones, Lyn Shill, Christine Henderson and Brian Bainbridge.                                                                                                                        ©Scheltema

 

The group is working along Back Creek, a tributary of the Coliban River. “Our primary goal has been to revisit Back Creek, which runs through the town, and rejuvenate the work of the earlier Landcare volunteers. We are removing woody weed regrowth and extending and diversifying planting. I just noticed we had a white-throated tree creeper feeding on a tree planted ten years ago. It takes that long for the tree to grow tall and wide enough to become suitable habitat for these birds.”

The group is hoping that by clearing and removing willows and other weeds the creek should flow again, and once again be a place for swimming and platypus as it  was previously. Taradale Primary School is also regularly involved in planting days and uses the creek as an open classroom.

Taradale Landcare secretary  Colleen Jones, seen here with member Brian Bainbridge, said “As well as restoring the health of the creek we’d like to inspire visitors and residents with the beauty and diversity of our local flora and fauna.”                                                                  ©Scheltema

 

In addition the group is working on roadside weed removal with funds provided by Mt Alexander Shire Council. This work is being undertaken at three sites of high biodiversity values that are leading into the forest along the edges of Fryers Ridge Conservation Reserve.

 

 

Taradale Landcare members on the look out for weeds encroaching into the Fryers Ridge Conservation Reserve.    ©Scheltema

 

NATIONAL TREE PLANTING DAY WITH CAMPASPE RIVER AND LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP

Why not join in with the CRLM group along the Campaspe River in Kyneton on National Tree Day Sunday 29th July to help revegetate the river?

 

Like to be involved in National Tree Day Sunday 29th July? Why not help CRLM group plant trees and shrubs such as the River Bottle Brush.

National Tree Day is Australia’s largest tree planting day. It started in 1996 and since then more than four million people have planted over 24 million trees and plants with the aim of caring for our land.

WHERE: The River end of Jennings St Kyneton (look for the CRLM trailer)

WHEN: 10 am  – 12 pm Sunday 29th July 

WHY: To help the CRLM group plant out trees and shrubs such as the River Bottle Brush.

Morning tea is provided.Wear gumboots, gloves and warm clothes. Tools and a delicious morning tea provided.

 

 

RIVER GUARDIANS

River Guardians on the Campaspe River at Carlsruhe                                                ©Scheltema

 

Wild and windy weather didn’t deter prospective River Guardians from walking along the Campaspe River at Carlsruhe  at a UCLN River Restoration Field Day in May. 32  people braved the elements to learn from 6 experts in the field how to restore river health. They were inspired by award winning river ecologists such as Damien Cook to protect the rivers and wetlands in their area and learnt some of the skills that would help them do so.

 

 

 

GRANTS

 

Apply before 20 July to ensure your school or group is in the running to secure a $5,000 grant! 

A preschooler learns about the endangered Hairy Anchor plant in Kyneton.                                 ©Scheltema

Exciting news for Victorian schools, kindergartens, childcare centres, Scouts, Girl Guides and youth groups that are interested in working on a Junior Landcare biodiversity project in 2018-19. The Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning in partnership with Landcare Australia is giving your school or group the opportunity to apply for a grant of up to $5,000 (excl GST) as part of the Victorian Junior Landcare and Biodiversity Grants.Apply now

 

EVENTS

2018 NATIONAL LANDCARE CONFERENCE AND AWARDS

Like to learn about all things Landcare? Then head up to  Brisbane for the 2018 National Landcare Conference

The early bird catches the worm. The 2018 National Landcare Conference and Awards is your opportunity to contribute to, engage with, and learn from your community and peers. Over three days, you will have the opportunity to be inspired by keynote speakers and informative presentations, take part in fun social events, and experience educational field trips.

Early bird registration closes 31 July 2018. REGISTER HERE

 

RESOURCES

 WINTER LANDCARE MAGAZINE
Issue 72 of the Victorian Landcare and Catchment Management magazine, which is a feature on Landcare and research is now available online. 

Among the stories in issue 72 are stories on: vegetation quality assessment by smart phone, citizen science, the social return on investment in Landcare projects, alternative fertiliser trials, and gorse and cactus bio control.

To read this issue of the magazine online (via Victorian Landcare Gateway) go to https://www.landcarevic.org.au/landcare-magazine/winter-2018/

To download the PDF version of this issue (and back issues) of the magazine and to access the magazine’s index go to https://www.landcarevic.org.au/resources/magazine-library/
This issue features our Networks Spotlight on Species Project and is mentioned by the Minister in the introduction. Direct link to story here:

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT July 2018

Click here to read the North Central ChatNorth Central Chat July 18

 

 

WOMBAT FORESTCARE NEWSLETTER JUNE 18

If you are interested in fungi you must read the latest beautiful newsletter from  Wombat Forest Care.

WFCNewsletterJune18

 

SERRATED TUSSOCK SIGNS AVAILABLE FOR FREE

The VSTWP have a number of Serrated Tussock Landowner Signs available for ‘Community Champions’ of Serrated Tussock management in Victoria. The signs are designed to be attached to landowner fences that face a roadside, and help the community deliver key messages on controlling this noxious weed.
If you would like to order a number of the these signs, please email  Executive Officer Martin Deering and he can post them out to you for free:
AUSTRALIAN TAXATION OFFICE HELP SHEET ON SHELTER BELTS.

ATO help sheet: Establishing shelterbelts on land used in a primary production business

https://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/view.htm?docid=AFS/ShelterBelts&PiT=99991231235958

 

WETLAND PLANT ID COURSE WITH DAMIEN COOK AND ELAINE BAYES

APRIL 2018

“WE DON’T HAVE TO ENGAGE IN GRAND, HEROIC ACTIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROCESS OF CHANGE. SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD.”

    Howard Zinn

 


Help re-vegetate the Campape River by planting a tree for your mum this Mothers Day on 13th May at the Kyneton Botanic Gardens. Pic Scheltema

 

  • SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES PROJECT UPDATE
  • GLENLYON UPPER LODDON LANDCARE GROUP JOINS UCLN
  • MOTHERS DAY PLANTING WITH CAMPASPE RIVER AND LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP
  • TYLDEN LANDCARE
  • UCLN NOW ON FACEBOOK
  • EVENTS, RESOURCES AND GRANTS

 

SPOTLIGHT ON SPECIES PROJECT UPDATE

 

Spotlighting for Threatened Species in the Wombat Forest with UCLN Threatened Species officer Brad Blake © Scheltema

 

A Forum in Newham in March, attended by over 100 people, launched the UCLN Spotlight on Species Project. Three expert speakers, Dr Todd Soderquist, Dr Ross Goldingay and Jess Lawton shared their wealth of knowledge about the three iconic species we are looking for -powerful owls, greater gliders and phascogales.

The distant call of an owl is often faint, and so as you stand in the darkness reaching out to hear it the world falls away in an almost Zen-like moment.” said Dr Soderquist at the Forum, who has over twenty years experience working with phascogales and Powerful Owls.

UCLN is working with the Macedon  Ranges Shire Council and more than 15 community groups and schools to conduct the surveys looking for the three species and is entering the resultant data into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas. UCLN Threatened Species officer Brad Blake has been leading the spotlighting events and installing remote sensing cameras on public and private land.

UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake explains to Michael Nott, President of Metcalfe Landcare, how to use the remote sensing cameras.© Scheltema

In the last two months 12 phascogales, 2 powerful owls and 5 greater gliders have been recorded.

We hope that at the end of this two year project our community will have the capacity to find and identify these species and enter this important data into the scientific record.Knowing the species and feeling connected to them is the first step to protecting the habitat that will ensure their survival.

 

A phascogale attempting to get at the delicious peanut butter bait is photographed by one of the the remote sensing cameras purchased recently by UCLN as part of their Spotlight on Species project.

If you would like to join in a Spotlighting survey please go to our website at /about-us/spotlight-on-species/ where you can see the dates and register to attend.

We have also produced DL brochures on the three species, so if your group doesn’t have these yet and would like some for their members please contact me. See Powerful Owl brochure below.

 

If your group would like to get involved in the remote camera project and discover what critters are around at night,  please contact UCLN Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake on brad@proconpest.com or 0421823998 to have cameras installed.

 

 GLENLYON UPPER LODDON LANDCARE GROUP JOINS UCLN

I am delighted to welcome a new group to our Landcare Network – the Glenlyon Upper Loddon Landcare Group.This hard working group has the Loddon River running through their boundaries and shares many of the UCLN goals.

The group formed in 1996  focusing  on weed control and re-vegetation, funded mainly by drought recovery money.Member Margret Lockwood said “In recent years the main focus has been the development of a 2 1/2 km walking trail from the Glenlyon Reserve to the Glenlyon Store with interpretative signage describing flora and fauna and environmental issues.We are hoping to include the Dja Dja Wurrung history of the area also.It’s our vision to continue the walking trail down to Loddon Falls, an extra 4 km.The falls are very special with great natural beauty.”

 

Member of Glenlyon Upper Loddon Landcare group Margret Lockwood on the newly opened biolink walking trail. © Scheltema

The walking track also functions as a biolink of native flora and fauna.It’s a little upland river valley.Said Margret “We wanted to join the UCLN because we felt we had similar goals.Geographically we are more aligned with the Landcare groups in the Central Victorian Uplands.

In November the group  will have an artist in residence running workshops on weaving and sculpture from found materials from the biolink.They have just finished a successful series of “Whats in Our Backyard” workshops, looking at issues such as flora and fauna, water quality, raptors and invertebrates.

 

 

MOTHERS DAY PLANTING WITH CAMPASPE RIVER AND LAND MANAGEMENT GROUP

Commemorate your mum by planting a tree this Mothers Day along the Campaspe River with the Campaspe River and Land Management Group. © Scheltema

Why not come along to the Kyneton Botanic Gardens on the 13th May, enjoy the beautiful autumn colours and plant a tree for your mum.

Campaspe River and Land Management Group will be providing River Bottle Brushes for planting along the Campaspe River . “Why not pay tribute to your Mum and help in our regeneration of the Campaspe River. Trees For Mums is a National Celebration of all Mothers. Its a beautiful gesture and a great experience to share with family and friends. Bring along gardening gloves, a trowel and sturdy shoes and enjoy the autumn colours of our beautiful Botanic Gardens and Campaspe River environment and create a living legacy for your mum. Morning tea will be provided.” said Peter Harding, President of the Campaspe Valley Land Management Group.

Trees For Mum first started in Sydney in 2002 by friends and colleagues, Deena Raphael and Lauren Adlam, as a way of paying tribute to their Mums, who they had both lost to cancer. It has grown since then to become a National Event with over 30, 000 sons and daughters planting trees for their Mothers.

For further information contact Per Harding on psharding77@gmail.com or 0419625600

WHERE: Pig Pens, Kyneton Botanic Gardens (via McKenna Drive, or if on foot via Campaspe River Walk)

WHEN: 10.00 am 13th May 2018

WHY: Commemorate your mum by planting a tree this Mothers Day

 

TYLDEN LANDCARE

Towards a Healthy Little Coliban River

 

James Stewart with Sarah, Alfie and Layla of Tylden School propagating seedlings for the Little Coliban River. Pic Brendan Smith

Students at Tylden Primary School have been hard at work “pricking out” small plants from seedling trays for further growing and hardening off before planting along the Little Coliban River later this year.

James Stewart of Tylden Landcare said “The students have enthusiastically embraced the program and have propagated indigenous trees, shrubs and grasses. Seed has been collected from local indigenous plants because these are most suited to local environmental conditions. The students are very aware that indigenous vegetation offers food and homes for native animals, prevents soil erosion and keeps the air clean. These plants will be planted along the Little Coliban River with Tylden Landcare  as part of the Coliban system Integrated Catchment Management program.

Tylden Landcare is working with landholders along the Little Coliban River and the North Central CMA to protect and rehabilitate the Little Coliban to ensure a healthy water supply for farms and all users of the Coliban water storage system. 

Along with parents, school staff assisted students on the day and said, “The senior students did a great job of passing on their plant propagation skills to the younger students!

Tylden Landcare is working with landholders along the Little Coliban River and the North Central CMA to protect and rehabilitate the Little Coliban River . © Scheltema

 

UCLN NOW ON FACEBOOK

 

If you use Facebook and want to be kept informed of UCLN events and activities we now have a Facebook Page.  Click here to see more. –UCLN Facebook.

Please like and share to promote to a broader audience. Dont forget you can also see events at our Calender on our website http://www.uppercampaspelandcare.org.au/calendar/ 

 

EVENTS

 

BEE KEEPING WORKSHOP IN MAY AT BALD HILL RESERVE

Would you like to learn more about bees? An introductory workshop for backyard bee keeping – Bee Happy – will be held in May (date to be confirmed) at Bald Hill reserve and is being run by Pipers Creek Landcare in May.For more details contact Peter Sporle at piperscreeklandcare@gmail.com

 

Learn about Bees with Pipers Creek Landcare at Bald Hill on May 26th

 

RIVER RESTORATION FIELD DAY 12TH May

The UCLN River Restoration Field Day in March was cancelled due to high fire danger and very high winds and is now rescheduled for 12th May.Please contact me on uclandcare@gmail.com soon if you would like to attend.Only a few places left!

Learn from wetland ecologist Damien Cook and other experts how to restore wetlands at the UCLN River Restoration Field Day on 12th May at Carlsruhe.© Scheltema

 

SERRATED TUSSOCK FIELD DAY

Worried you might have serrated tussock on your property and dont know how to manage it?

Come along to this workshop to have all your questions answered.

 

 

 

 

DUAN TALK MAY 3RD 7-8 pm MALDON

 

 

 

 

LANDCARE VICTORIA  FORUM QUEENSCLIFFE 25TH -26TH MAY 2018

Like to learn from fellow Landcarers in the Corangamite area? Why not attend the next Landcare Victoria Forum at Queenscliffe.

Register at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VKYRZ2W and the promotional flier and the draft programme are available here.

 

PLATYPUS – ‘ASK THE EXPERT’ VIRTUAL SESSION WITH TIANA PRESTON June 5th

A great resource for any schools involved with your Landcare group – a virtual session on platypus being hosted on World Environment Day.

 

NATIONAL LANDCARE CONFERENCE 10-12TH OCTOBER BRISBANE

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT MAY 2018

Click here to read the North Central ChatMay edition  and if you missed it here is the April edition  North Central Chat

 

LANDCARE AUSTRALIA LANDLINK APRIL ISSUE

To read the latest Landlink click here: Landcare Australia Landlink

 

YOUNG FARMERS WANTED!

Expressions of Interest are now open to join the Young Farmers Advisory Council from young farmers and those involved in the food and fibre supply chain.

Council membership: the Council consists of eight members with a balance of representation by gender, industry and region. Collectively, Council members will have a broad range of skills and experience, including farm management, agribusiness, finance, education, international markets and regional development.
Council’s role: council members provide advice to the Victorian Government about practical actions and opportunities to attract and retain young people in agriculture. The council also assists government to better understand the needs of young people in agriculture and helps to develop solutions and shape support for young people on the land. In 2018, the Council will focus on implementation of its Recommendations Report.
Council members also act as young ambassadors to attract new entrants to the state’s agriculture sector and help to shape future support for young people on the land.
EOIs close: Expressions of Interest to join the Council close on 11 May 2018.
More information: visit http://agriculture.vic.gov.au/agriculture/food-and-fibre-industries/young-farmers/advisory-council 

 

YOUNG FARMERS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

Young farmers in Victoria can access scholarships of up to $10,000 to help boost skills and implement new on-farm initiatives.Up to $10,000 is available for farmers and farm workers aged 35 years or under to help them with professional development and career progression.
This includes $5,000 for study, backed by a further $5,000 to invest on-farm or in professional development activities to help put new skills into practice.
The Victorian Government’s Young FarmersScholarship Program aims to support young farmers to build productive and profitable careers
in agriculture. The Program recognises that in the future, young farmers will need a broad range of skills so they can embrace new technologies, respond to a range of challenges and capitalise on emerging opportunities.
Applications close: 24 April 2018
For more information and to apply visit:Young Farmers Scholarships

 

 

PREMIERS SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS

Entries in the 2018 Victorian Premier’s Sustainability Awards – which recognise individuals, communities, organisations and businesses that are leading the way to a sustainable future – have been officially opened.

The 2018 Premier’s Sustainability Awards categories are:

  • Built Environment
  • Community
  • Education
  • Environmental Justice
  • Environmental Protection
  • Government
  • Health
  • Innovative Products or Services
  • Small and Medium Enterprises
  • Large Business

Entries are open now. For more information go to sustainabilityawards.vic.gov.au

 

 

GRANTS AVAILABLE

 

Looking for funding for your group to undertake projects? See grants available below.© Scheltem

 

 

 WETTENHALL ENVIRONMENT TRUST SMALL ENVIRONMENT GRANTS SCHEME

The  Wettenhall environment trust are looking for projects around :

  • flora and fauna conservation (Australia-wide)
  • threatened mammal conservation (Australia-wide)
  • landscape restoration and education (Victoria only)

These projects should involve any of the following:

  • monitoring, recording and sharing data
  • delivering community education
  • providing community capacity building (e.g. training)
  • research and science


Application Process Diagram – these are the questions that will appear in the on-line application.

Can you Apply page – more details on eligibility. Please don’t waste your time filling in the EOI – see if you are eligible first.

Frequently Asked Questions – your question might get answered here.

Dates for applying – we have four rounds every year.

Apply here – here is the online application form, which only appears live when a grant round is open.

 

Come up with an idea, vote for your favorites and make your community an even better place to live.New fund for Locals,voted for by locals –Pick your Project. © Scheltema                                                             

 

 

PICK YOUR PROJECT: New Fund For Locals, Decided By Locals

Pick My Project is a new community grants initiative, with $30M available to fund local projects. Come up with an idea, vote for your favorites and make your community an even better place to live.

Project ideas: Victorian residents are encouraged to submit ideas for projects that could benefit their community. Ideas could include sporting/recreation infrastructure/activities, community arts or culture projects, improvements to community facilities, and improvements to the local environment etc etc.
Choosing projects: eligible ideas will be put forward for community voting. During voting, applicants will work with their networks and encourage their community to vote for their project. Local projects will be chosen by local residents. Communities will get to vote for the projects they think are most important.
Sponsor organisation: as part of the application process, Victorians will need to identify an eligible organisation to sponsor, or support, their idea and to administer funds through a registered ABN.
Eligible organisations could include a local community organisation or school, local council, or other eligible group.  More information on eligible organisations will be made available in May 2018. able to help deliver the project.
Guidelines: there will be no restrictive guidelines – meaning many local priorities that fall-between the cracks of other grant programs will be eligible for funding.
Who can be involved: all Victorian residents aged 16 and over will be able to submit their idea for consideration under the program. For participants under 18, parent or guardian approval will be required.
Funding for projects: projects can cost $20,000 and $200,000. Funding will be spread across the state, giving every community the chance to benefit.
When: the initiative will start in May. Winning projects will be announced in September 2018.
Register your interest: register via pickmyproject.vic.gov.au
More information: email contact@engage.vic.gov.au call 1800 797 818 or connect on Facebook www.facebook.com/pickmyproject

FEBRUARY 2018

“ONCE DESTROYED NATURE’S BEAUTY CANNOT BE REPURCHASED AT ANY PRICE”

Ansel Adams

I was lucky enough to watch this Yellow-faced Honeyeater build her nest and raise three chicks on my veranda over Christmas. Pic Scheltema

 

  • UCLN APPOINTS NEW THREATENED SPECIES PROJECT OFFICER
  • PHASCOGALE SIGHTINGS WANTED!
  • SEED COLLECTING BEGINS AT BALD HILL RESERVE
  • ASHBOURNE LANDCARE CONTINUES BIOLINKS PROJECT
  • VBA GO APP LAUNCHED
  • EVENTS, RESOURCES AND GRANTS

Welcome to the summer edition of the UCLN ENews. Scroll down to the Events and Resources section and you will find a wealth of interesting events on offer – from Social Media training, a Sustainable Soils conference, a Forum to launch our Citizen Science project and much more.

 

UCLN APPOINTS BRAD BLAKE AS THREATENED SPECIES PROJECT OFFICER

 

Newly appointed Threatened Species Officer Brad Blake is examined  by a phascogale, one of the species he will be  surveying with the help of our community . Pic Scheltema

I would like to welcome Brad Blake to the UCLN. He will be leading surveys for three threatened species – the Powerful Owl, Phascogale and Greater glider – in our area in conjunction with our Landcare community.

Brad brings with him a wealth of experience in threatened species monitoring. He has worked across Australia in various roles protecting native species and engaging communities in order to raise awareness of Australia’s declining biodiversity. Over the past 2 years Brad has surveyed forests for threatened species across Victoria, in particular Greater glider, Powerful owl, Barking owl and Spotted-tailed quoll.

He has recently uncovered new populations of Greater glider and Long nosed bandicoot in West Gippsland and has confirmed several old records of Greater glider in the Wombat State Forest.

Greater Glider, one of the species the UCLN will be surveying as part of our Citizen Science Project.  Pic Matt Wright.

 

“I’m honored and excited to be working with the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network and the Macedon Ranges Shire Council in this role as Threatened Species Community Project Officer. It’s extremely important that we continue to collect data on the threatened species of our region so that Government and the community can better manage our public and private land. This will ensure that species at risk of extinction survive and persist into the future for generations to come.”

“I’m looking forward to engaging  the community and helping them learn the techniques required to survey their local area for these iconic threatened species.” said Brad.

To find out how you can become involved in this exciting two year project to help protect these cryptic and elusive  species come along to a Forum on the 10th March from 2.00 – 5.00 pm at Newham Mechanics Hall. Book at this link – BookForum

 

 

PHASCOGALE SIGHTINGS WANTED!

Do you think there may be phascogales on your property? Contact Brad Blake to become part of our remote camera project. Pic Scheltema

 

As part of the funding from the Biodiversity on-ground Action Grants the UCLN has purchased five remote sensing cameras to help us photograph and record threatened species.Our Threatened Species Community Project Officer Brad Blake has already begun installing cameras on some sites.

If you think you may have phascogales in your area, or have seen them dead or alive please contact Brad at  brad@proconpest.com or 0421823998.

Also if you have been hearing the distinctive Woooo-wooo of the Powerful Owl, or have seen their pellets (which are regurgitated possums or birds bones and fur or feathers) please contact myself or Brad. Another clue that you may have them in your area is finding possums tails which the owls often pull off and discard when feeding.

More at this link an-eye-on-special-species

 

Powerful Owl pellet.If you have seen these can you please collect them and contact Brad or myself.
Pic Scheltema

 

 

SEED COLLECTION BEGINS AT BALD HILL

Alida Fabris from the Friends of Bald Hill Reserve with some of the blackwood seed that the group is collecting to propagate and grow at the Reserve. Pic Scheltema

 

The Friends of Bald Hill Reserve are working on increasing the mid story vegetation at the Reserve as a result of their recent successful Biodiversity On Ground Action grant. Members of the Friends group were recently collecting seed at the Reserve guided by Matt Comer and Ash Elliott from Goldfields Revegetation.

President Carolyn Robb said “This is an exciting opportunity to not only learn about seed collection but to also learn from experts about plant identification. It is a great opportunity to learn about new species. We are trying to increase the mid-storey vegetation at Bald Hill Reserve.It is important habitat for threatened species such as the phascogale. We want to ensure we have the correct habitat to increase their chances of survival.”

 

 

 

ASHBOURNE LANDCARE CONTINUES BIOLINKS PROJECT

 

A Dianella amoena (Matted Flax-lily), one of the threatened species which will benefit from the work of Ashbourne Landcare.                                                                    Pic Scheltema

 

As a result of their successful Biodiversity On-ground Action Funding, Ashbourne Landcare is working on a project to create individual sections of biolinks to link remnant patches of vegetation across the Ashbourne Landscape.The project brings together 11 landowners who are dedicating parts of their properties to support biodiversity with the aim of improving habitat area and connectivity across the landscape.

Said Ashbourne Landcare member Alan Denehey “This follows on from last years successful project to set up five biolink demonstration sites working with six landowners. The work will include flora surveys, woody weed removal, livestock exclusion fencing and planting with indigenous species appropriate to the terrain.”

These works will particularly support  threatened species such as Powerful Owls, matted flax-lillies and phascogales.”

 

 

Ashbourne Landcare is helping protect threatened species by collaborating with 11 landowners to improve biodiversity and connectivity in the Ashbourne landscape. Pic Scheltema

 

 

This is just one of the many great projects being undertaken by UCLN member groups working hard to protect our environment.

 

VBA GO APP LAUNCHED

 

Using phones at Bald Hill Reserve to enter data on species. Pic Scheltema.

Help record our precious flora and fauna in the region by using the new VBA Go App.This mobile tool  links directly to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas, making it easier  for environmental managers, researchers, students and community members to record Victoria’s native flora and fauna whilst out and about. For more information on the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas follow this link:  VicBioAtlas

Before using the App you first need to  register with the VBA  which you can do  on the link above.

The UCLN has been working with DELWP to trial the new App.We will be holding further workshops on using it at a later date.Interested? Watch this short video about the App featuring  Carolyn Robb from Friends of Bald Hill Reserve and myself.

VBA Go – Knowledge is Power

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlbn8NuIvxI

 

 

MACEDON RANGES SHIRE COUNCIL NEW BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY

Contribute to the Macedon Ranges Biodiversity Strategy and help protect the Shires special natural places. Pic Scheltema

 

MRSC COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROCESS:

For those of you in the Macedon Shire, Council is inviting feedback on its new Biodiversity Strategy that will guide Council and the community to work towards a healthier environment and better protection for our native plants and  animals.

From Monday 5 February, residents can have their say on the Shire’s biodiversity assets by pinpointing important natural features on an interactive map, available at www.mrsc.vic.gov.au/yoursay

Online feedback on the Biodiversity Strategy finishes on 12th of March.

For more information on the Biodiversity Strategy call Krista Patterson-Majoor on 5421 9503.

Drop-in sessions on the Biodiversity Strategy  will be held on:

Thursday 15 February, 5pm-7pm, Room 3 at Kyneton Mechanics Institute, 81 Mollison Street, Kyneton.

Monday 12 February, 6pm-8pm, Lancefield Neighbourhood House, 8 Hamilton Street, Gisborne.

Wednesday 21 February, 6pm-8pm, Lancefield Neighbourhood House, 78 High Street, Lancefield.

 

Krista will  be following up with individual Landcare and Friend groups to gain their input soon, and will attend the next UCLN General meeting.

 

 

 

EVENTS

 

FORUM TO LAUNCH CITIZEN SCIENCE PROJECT

Come along to the Forum to see how you can become a valuable part of this Citizen Science Project to gather data which will help protect threatened species in our area.

“If you have an interest in understanding native wildlife on your property, then we encourage you to get involved,” said Mayor, Cr Jennifer Anderson.“You can help us determine whether these species still exist in various locations and if so, how many still occur and whether the populations are secure.”

Senior Threatened Species officer from the Office of Environment and Heritage NSW Dr Todd Soderquist will be sharing his knowledge gleaned from many years of researching and radio tagging Powerful Owls and phascogales in Central Victoria. Also presenting will be Dr Ross Goldingay, an expert on gliders from Southern Cross University and editor of Australian Mammalogy. Ross has pioneered a successful method for gliders to cross major roads safely. Jess Lawton, PhD student from Latrobe University  who is currently conducting research on phascogales in Central Victoria will also be on hand to share her extensive knowledge.
We are hoping landowners who have heard or seen any of these species on their properties come along to the Forum to find out how their presence can be verified and entered into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas to ensure their protection.

 

To book call 54219669 or click on this link –  BookForum 

 

 

RIVER RESTORATION WORKSHOP

“People will come away from this workshop with practical guidelines for protecting and restoring riparian areas. They will learn the principles of river ecology and river restoration. Riparian areas and floodplain habitats are hot spots of biodiversity as they provide the lifeblood of the ecosystem.” said wetland ecologist Damien Cook, seen here with Angela Gladman from the NCCMA on the Campaspe River at Carlsruhe. Pic Scheltema

 

Do you have a river, creek or wetland on your property? Would you like to learn from experts how to restore and rehabilitate it? Why not come along to the free River Restoration workshop being held at the beautiful historic Degraves Mill in Carlsruhe.

The workshop which will help landowners gain the tools and understanding  to improve riparian areas on their properties. Damien Cook and Elaine Bayes from Rakali Ecological Consulting (who between them have over 40 years experience in restoring wetlands) will be presenting and sharing their wealth of knowledge on the subject
Angela Gladman, Caring for the  Campaspe Project Manager from the North Central CMA will be discussing techniques and strategies for improving waterway health.

The theoretical component of the workshop and lunch will be held in the beautiful historic bluestone Degraves Mill, and participants will walk a 2 km stretch of the Campaspe River on the property to discuss the successful regeneration techniques that have been employed.

Participants must have a moderate level of fitness and bring hats, water and appropriate footwear.

 

 

Bookings essential by calling 54219660 or clicking on RiverRestoration

 

 

FARMING FOR SUSTAINABLE SOILS CONFERENCE

 

When: March 8 & 9, 2018
Where: Capital Theatre Bendigo
RSVP: by Friday 23rd February via https://soils.eventbrite.com.au/ or contact the North Central CMA on (03) 5448 7124

 

 

FUTURE FARMING EXPO

 

 

WHEN: 8.30AM 21 FEBRUARY 2018
WHERE:DONALD STADIUM

FREE EVENT (INCLUDING LUNCH)
RSVP Is essential to the North Central CMA by Friday
16 February on (03) 5448 7124 or info@nccma.vic.gov.au

 

 

SOCIAL MEDIA TRAINING

 

Facebook 101~Social Media Training
for Landcare Groups

When: Wednesday 21 March, 2018
Where: Rifle Brigade Hotel, Bendigo

NCCMA is hosting a Facebook 101 workshop to enable participants to both upskill and produce an implementation plan for social media, on Wednesday 21 March in Bendigo. Professionally facilitated by Friendly Savage Communications Consultants, this Facebook focused workshop will be presented in three bite-sized sessions. You can choose your preferred workshop or stay all day. Participants should have an existing Facebook profile and a basic knowledge of their phone or computer

For more information and to book please go to https://facebook101forlandcare.eventbrite.com.au or email tess.grieves@nccma.vic.gov.au

LIMITED PLACES AVAILABLE

Workshop topics include:

• Social media networking
• How to create engaging video.
• Content planning and best practice.
• Facebook Groups.
• Facebook Overview.
• Social Media Tools.

 

CHEMICAL USERS TRAINING COURSE

Do you want to learn the skills and confidence to safely and effectively use a range of herbicides, including some targeted herbicides for controlling specific weeds? Then you might be interested in doing a Chemical Users Training course. Please let me know as NCCMA will be offering one soon.

INTERESTED IN FARM WATER SUPPLY?
 Martin Hamilton from Ag Vic is looking to run some sessions on Farm Water Supply. The session details how to calculate how much water you have and how long supplies are likely to last as well determining pipe sizes, friction loss as well as demand. If anyone would be interested in knowing more about the above please let me know.

 

 

 

RESOURCES

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

For the latest edition of the North Central Chat click here:NCChatFeb18

 

 

 

 

NEW WEED BROCHURES

Learn how to control weeds such as gorse on your property. A new set of brochures are available on weed control in the Mt Alexander Shire area. Pic Scheltema

Metcalfe, Langley and Malmsbury Landcare have worked with the Tarrangower Catus Control Group (TCCG) on a project producing brochures about weed control. Five brochures were created, one specific for each of the five wards within Mt Alexander Shire. The brochures highlight problem weeds in each ward and encourage landowners to manage their weeds by providing essential information.They also provide information about the responsibilities of landowners to manage weeds, the best control methods to use and where to find more detailed information.A digital version is available by clicking on this link – COLIBAN-Weed-Brochure-2018 . Hard copies available from the Mt Alexander Shire Offices.

If you have a neighbor that is not being responsible about their weeds, maybe you could put one in their letter box?

 

 

 VICTORIAN LANDCARE MAGAZINE LOOKING FOR STORIES !

The winter 2018 issue (#72) of the Victorian Landcare magazine is a feature on Landcare and research. Stories on all aspects of Landcare-related research are sought, from citizen science projects through to large scale experiments and trials. Readers of the magazine are keen to learn about the successes of research projects, as well as what hasn’t worked, and the insights and reflections of your group along the way. Please contact Carrie Tiffany (editor) with your story ideas – editorviclandcare@gmail.com

Contributions for the winter 2018 issue of the magazine should be sent to the editor by Thursday 29 March 2018.

CLICK HERE for more information on the contribution guidelines for the Victorian Landcare magazine.

JUNIOR LANDCARE

You can access the latest Junior Landcare newsletter by clicking on this link. JuniorLandcare2018

 

LANDLINK

The latest Land Link is available here – LandLinkJan18

 

LANDCARE AUSTRALIA NEWS

For the latest Landcare Australia News click on this link – LandcareAustraliaNews

 

 

 

 

GRANTS

 

Is your group hungry for money? Why not apply for a grant from your local council? See details below. Pic Scheltema

 MT ALEXANDER COMMUNITY GRANTS PROGRAM

Applications are now open for Council’s Community Grants Program. Grants of up to $3,000 are available to incorporated and not-for-profit community groups and organisations to support local community-based projects and initiatives that align with Council objectives.

Applications will close on 23 February 2018 at 4pm.

Download the Program Guidelines

Apply now

For additional information about the Community Grants Program, please call 5471 1744 or email grants@mountalexander.vic.gov.au.

 

HEPBURN SHIRE COMMUNITY GRANTS PROGRAM

Community groups are encouraged to apply for funding for events, programs, projects and equipment.  Grants can be sought for amounts up to $2,000.

Prospective applicants must contact a Council Officer prior to submitting an application – refer to guidelines for contact details.

Community Grants Program Guidelines 2017-2018

Apply Here

 

 

MACEDON RANGES SHIRE COUNCIL SMALL COMMUNITY GRANTS SCHEMES

The Small Community Grants Scheme supports community projects that are unlikely to be funded through annual funding schemes.They are open throughout the year, except in the lead up to a Council election.More info at this link NextWho can apply?

 

ABORIGINAL WATER GRANTS PROGRAM  2017/18 

 

Aboriginal communities’ connection to country is basic to their sense of identity and cultural continuity.Victoria’s waterways are an important part of country that have been damaged by the development of the state’s water resources. There are opportunities to restore this damage and in doing so enhance Aboriginal communities’ well-being. Also, improving Aboriginal Victorian’s access to water resources on country offers important opportunities for economic development. Find out more below.closes Wed. 7 Feb.

How to apply:
1. Download and read the Application Guidelines (PDF, 401.8 KB).
2.        Complete the application form online.

 

 

NOVEMBER 2017

You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” Dame Goodall- primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist, and UN Messenger of Peace

 

The nationally endangered White Sunray flower (Leucochrysum albicans subsp.albicans var). Landcare members and others learnt about the importance of protecting our remnant grasslands at a recent UCLN workshop with the ‘Wildflower Whisperer’ Dr Paul Gibson-Roy, lead scientist from Greening Australia. ©Scheltema

 

 

  • CITIZEN SCIENCE PROJECT UNDERWAY FOR UCLN
  • KYNETON SECONDARY COLLEGE STUDENTS WIN RESOURCE SMART SCHOOLS AWARD
  • EAGLES MONITORED BY PIPERS CREEK LANDCARE
  • UCLN BIOLINK PROJECT UPDATE
  • THE WILDFLOWER WHISPERER AT NEWHAM HALL.
  • NEW VICTORIAN BIODIVERSITY ATLAS APP
  • JUVENILE BARKING OWL STEALS THE SHOW
  • CONTRIBUTE TO THE HEPBURN SHIRE COUNCIL BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY
  • SUCCESSFUL COLLABORATION AT METCALFE
  • KYNETON SHOW
  • RABBIT UPDATE
  • EVENTS
  • GRANTS, NEWS AND RESOURCES

 

 

CITIZEN SCIENCE PROJECT UNDERWAY FOR UCLN

Greater Glider (Petauroides volans), one of the threatened species to be surveyed as part of the UCLN Citizen Science Project funded by the latest Biodiversity Grants ©Scheltema

 

The UCLN and four of its member groups have been acknowledged for their vital work to protect threatened flora and fauna by being awarded more than $200,000 in funding from the latest round of the state government’s Biodiversity On Ground Action Grants.

All these important projects align with the UCLN Strategic Plan and will help our volunteers continue to work towards protecting our precious environment, including threatened species.

The UCLN received $46,485 to undertake citizen surveys over two years in our region. We will work in conjunction with the environmental officer from Macedon Ranges Shire Council and members of our Landcare and Friends groups to confirm the presence of powerful owls, greater gliders and the brush-tailed phascogale (all of which are listed as vulnerable under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act in Victoria). An experienced project officer will be employed to work alongside community members to conduct the surveys and enter data on these animals into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas.

The information gathered will help build an important database relating to vulnerable species in our area and therefore be a step towards implementing measures to protect them.

If you are interested in getting involved with this project please save the date for the Forum on the 10th March to launch the project.

Ashbourne Landcare, The Friends of Bald Hill Reserve, The Campaspe River and Land Management Group and Trentham and District  Landcare were also successful in the funding round. For details on their projects go to flora-and-fauna-funds-flow/

 

 

KYNETON SECONDARY COLLEGE STUDENTS WIN RESOURCE SMART SCHOOLS AWARD FOR WORK WITH LANDCARE


Kyneton Secondary College was named Biodiversity School Of The Year at the Resource Smart Schools Awards   for their work with the UCLN, Friends of Bald Hill Reserve and Campaspe River and Land Management Group. Students are seen here with with insects from the  traps they constructed to look at the phascogale’s food source at Bald Hill Reserve. ©Scheltema

 

Kyneton Secondary College won Biodiversity School Of The Year at the Resource Smart Schools Awards. Sustainability Victoria received 150 entries from 87 schools. KSC students have been working with the UCLN and Friends of Bald Hill Reserve collecting data on insect populations at the Bald Hill reserve  in research aimed at  helping preserve populations of the endangered phascogale, as well as planting over 1500 trees along the Campaspe River with the Campaspe Land and River management Group.

By monitoring insect diversity students hoped to identify how the availability of certain foods affected resident phascogales. Sustainability Victoria interim CEO Stephanie Ziersch said the awards showcased what was possible in schools and the wider community. “The awards really are the ultimate ‘show and tell’ and celebrate the achievement of schools across the state who are committed to sustainable action,” she said.

The school  started working with our Network two years ago, and it is wonderful to see them acknowledged in these state wide Awards. Read more about the project in this story published in the Bendigo Advertiser by clicking here :AwardforKSC

A student at Kyneton Secondary College constructing insect traps for installation at Bald Hill Reserve.©Scheltema

 

 

 

 

EAGLES MONITORED BY PIPERS CREEK LANDCARE

A juvenile wedge tailed eagle on the nest in the Pipers Creek area. ©Scheltema

 

Pipers Creek Landcare members have been watching a juvenile wedge-tail eagle on the nest, the third time they have observed a a pair breeding in the Pipers Creek/Cobaw area.
Returning to the massive nest built in 2014  the pair, having shared the incubation period of a month, hatched the chick around the 10th September. It first appeared as a white, fluffy chick about the size of a silky hen. Grey pin feathers appeared around a month later and the rufus brown, permanent feathers (pictured) at 2 months of age. The chick now spends considerable time on the nest rim flapping its wings in preparation for its first flight, around mid December.

The female is a huge bird just over a meter tall with a 2.3m wing- span and a talon spread of about 40cm. Her mate is almost black in colour and considerably smaller. He is pictured here  just above the tree canopy being shadowed by a pair of territorial ravens who have a nest in a nearby tree. ©Scheltema

Keep an eye out for three eagles in Kyneton’s North Eastern sky around Christmas and New Year by which time the young chick will be about the size of its father. It will  make its own way in the world about June.

 

 

UCLN BIOLINK PROJECT UPDATE

Some of the last remnant grasslands in our Network are being surveyed by ecologists as part of the UCLN biolink project. Seen here is Penny Roberts from Newham and District Landcare with ecologist Karl Just surveying grasslands at Carlsruhe cemetery, which is part of the Cobaw Campaspe Connections Biolink project. ©Scheltema

 

The UCLN Cobaw Campaspe Connections and Coliban Corridor Biolink projects are now coming towards the end of their second year of funding, with several ecologists being employed recently to survey areas of high conservation values within the biolink areas.

These projects , which involve Woodend, Newham, Carlsruhe and Ashbourne in the east on Five Mile Creek and the Campaspe River and in the west, Trentham, Tylden and Malmsbury on the Coliban River, represent the network’s first attempt at collaborative landscape-scale projects in support of biodiversity. We are now starting to discuss a further cluster project in the north possibly involving the Malmsbury, Metcalfe, Taradale and Campaspe Valley groups.” said UCLN President Alan Denehey

You can read the action plans on the biolinks produced by our Vice President Dr Sophie Bickford by clicking on about-us/reports/

 

WILDFLOWER WHISPERER AT NEWHAM HALL

 

About 45 people gathered recently at Newham Hall at a workshop organised by UCLN to discuss Native pastures.They learnt about how to create them, the importance of remnant grasslands and how we can help preserve them.

Lead scientist with Greening Australia Dr Paul Gibson-Roy (also known as the Wildflower Whisperer) traveled from Sydney to present at a UCLN workshop last week. ©Scheltema

 

Lead scientist from Greening Australia traveled from Sydney to present the workshop and afterwards participants visited Carlsruhe cemetery to look at native grasslands.  Dr Gibson-Roy co- authored a wonderful book on the subject called “The Land Of Sweeping Plains”.

The story of Native Grasses is critical to the human race. We have grown as a species to populate this planet on the coat tails of grassy ecosystems;they are fundamental to our story. We can effectively manage and we can reconstruct native grassy landscapes….and if in the end it turns out that we dont commit the will and resources to conserve or restore the environment, such as we do for things that generate wealth or protect us from each other, that will be yet another sad human story for which we would probably pay dearly. But I choose to hope for the better part of our nature and the alternative scenario. Humans are remarkable. We have had a profound negative impact on many species, who have no capacity to articulate for themselves or stop us. But our unique ability to use reason and use it to develop ethics gives us the capacity to understand this fact and act upon it. I truly hope we can accept the responsibility beholden upon us not to destroy a world that supports us and millions of other species.” said Dr Gibson-Roy

To read more click on  the-wildflower-whisperer-to-visit/

 

NEW VICTORIAN BIODIVERSITY ATLAS APP -VBA Go

 

Mel Hardy, Senior Biodiversity Curator from DEWLP explains the new VBA Go App, designed to make it easier to enter data on flora and fauna into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas to President of Friends Of Bald Hill Reserve Carolyn Robb. They are seen here entering a Brooker gum into the Atlas with Rachel Robertson  ©Scheltema

 

The UCLN has been trialing the new Victorian Biodiversity Atlas App –VBA Go  in conjunction with the Senior Biodiversity Curator from DEWLP. In order to protect the environmental values of our area it is important to record what is there. You can be part of entering important data in your groups area (For example Black Gums to rare orchids, phascogales or whatever your group is monitoring) by learning how to use this simple app.

The Victorian Biodiversity Atlas contains all the collated information of flora and fauna sightings across Victoria. Unfortunately the atlas has a disappointing number of flora and fauna records for the Macedon Ranges.The new app – VBA Go, makes data entry easy. It is a pocket version of the atlas that can be used on smart phones. You can very simply see sightings recorded near you and record a sighting yourself.

An “Introduction to the VBA Go App” workshop will be held at 5 pm on Wednesday the 13th of December 2017 in the Barringo Room at the Gisborne Shire Offices.

Interested in getting involved? Contact Krista Patterson-Major on 5421 9503 or email kpatterson-majoor@mrsc.vic.gov.au to find out how to register for the atlas and to RSVP for the workshop.

We will be conducting more workshops on using the VBA Go App next year.

Before using the App you first need to  register with the VBA  which you can do  here: biodiversity/victorian-biodiversity-atlas  

 

 

JUVENILE BARKING OWL STEALS THE SHOW AT THE CASCADES

A juvenile barking Owl named Skeksi stole the show at a UCLN event at the Cascades in Metcalfe. ©Scheltema

A seven-week-old barking owl named Skeksi stole the show at an Upper Campaspe Landcare event  at the Cascades in Metcalfe recently. Despite being preceded in the display by a spectacular flying Nankeen Kestrel (who delighted the audience by occasionally landing on peoples heads), an Australian hobby and a little eagle, young Skeksi won over the crowd with her inquisitive nature, whole mouse eating ability and neck contortions. The display at the Cascades was held for the landcare community after the UCLN Annual General Meeting.

Barking owls are listed as endangered in Victoria and Martin Scuffins from the Leigh Valley Hawk and Owl Sanctuary spoke of the need to protect the habitat of these and other birds that are in decline.”It’s up to us to protect their habitat. Species minus habitat equals extinction.We don’t own the environment, it belongs to these creatures as well.” said Martin.

 

 

CONTRIBUTE TO THE HEPBURN SHIRE COUNCIL BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY

If your group falls within the Hepburn Shire Council boundaries you may be interested in having input into the HSC’s draft Biodiversity Strategy. On Thursday 7 December there will be an open workshop for groups to have input into the Strategy.  The draft strategy proposes to involve landcare groups – so if you are able to attend and provide input that would be great.
Thursday 07 December – 2pm to 4pm
Daylesford Senior Citizens Centre


You can see the  DRAFT Biodiversity Strategy 2017-2021 here :Hepburn-Shire-Council-Biodiversity-Strategy-DRAFT-October-2017-1.pdf
To register your interest or for more information contact Justin Fiddes, Manager Planning on 5348 2306 or email jfiddes@hepburn.vic.gov.au   Read a story about the issue in the Daylesford paper here: share-your-thoughts-on-biodiversity

 

 

 

 

SUCCESSFUL COLLABORATION AT METCALFE

A successful collaboration between Landmate,  Metcalfe Landcare and the CFA  resulted in a large amount of gorse control at the Cascades. Pic Michael Nott

 

In September prisoners from the Loddon Prison in Castlemaine (part of the Landmate Program) undertook three days of gorse control at the Cascades, directed by Metcalfe Landcare.
In a true example of community working together the local CFA then undertook a burn of the gorse which had been cut by the prisoners. Planting of indigenous grasses and shrubs will begin in Autumn.
Debbie Farmer, the Secretary of Metcalfe Landcare Group said “The Cascades Project is a continuing signature effort of the Group, given that the Park is a treasure for local and visiting families.  The Group plans to restore the native vegetation and access and amenities of this beautiful area of the Coliban.”
 Ms Farmer says that, like other projects in Metcalfe, with its small but active community, success follows cooperation: in this case between Landcare, the CFA, the Metcalfe Community Organisation, the Landmate Environment Program,Connecting Country and the UCLN.  For more information and the opportunity to participate please contact metcalfe.landcare@gmail.com
If your group would like help from the Landmate program with projects such as weed control, fencing, planting etc please contact me on uclandcare2gmail.com

KYNETON SHOW

Some of the many visitors who visited the Landcare Stall at Kyneton Show to receive their free plant and learn about Landcare in the District.

 

The UCLN was at Kyneton Show again this year and there was a lot of interest in Landcare activities in our district. Brendan Smith from Tylden Landcare was kept busy giving away native plants as part of the Show bags. He also provided plants to Lady Brookes Kindergarten in Kyneton as part of a Junior Landcare Grant Project.

Lady Brookes Kindergarten was a recipient of a Junior Landcare grant which enable them to plant native species and construct a sensory garden. ©Scheltema

 

RABBIT UPDATE

 

 

The UCLN recently ran a Rabbit Busters workshop well attended by over 53 people.

John Matthews, biosecurity officer with Agriculture Victoria, spoke about the new RHDV1 K5 rabbit virus and explained how to maximize the impact of the release and help reduce rabbit numbers on your property. Landowners gained an understanding on appropriate use of the new virus and how to obtain it. “The combination of an improved biological control agent in RHDV1K5, community led rabbit management, and using best practice rabbit management principles, should provide opportunity to manage and maintain rabbit numbers at low levels.” said Mr Matthews.

Mr Matthews also provided information on the latest local, state, and national evaluation of the establishment, spread and impact of the virus, including where the virus has established, where it has spread and what level of impact it is having.

A good time to release the virus is at the end of summer. Why not coordinate with your neighbors to purchase and release it if rabbits are a problem in your area?

How can I purchase a vial of RHDV1 K5 virus?

RHDV1 K5 is available to purchase at $120 per vial plus postage and packaging from the Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute by contacting Alison Jugow via email: alison.jugow@dpi.nsw.gov.au

Please include the following details in your purchase request:

  • Your name
  • Postal address
  • Email address
  • Contact phone number
  • Number of vials to be purchased
  • Date of when vials are needed.

More info on how to use at http://www.pestsmart.org.au/boosting-rabbit-biocontrol-rhdv-k5-national-release/ or contact John Matthews from Agriculture Victoria john.matthews@ecodev.vic.gov.au

 

 

EVENTS

 

 

 

  • CELEBRATE WORLD SOIL HEALTH DAY ON 5TH DEC

 

“Soil is the key to all health and knowing about your soil empowers you to manage it more sustainably. Attendees will go home knowing more about their soil and what to do to maintain good soil.” said Martin Hamilton, one of the presenters on the day at the upcoming Soil Health Workshop. ©Scheltema

 

Why not celebrate World Soil Health Day by coming along to a Soil Health Workshop organised by UCLN at an Olive Farm at Edgecombe on Tuesday 5th December?

Experts such as Martin Hamilton, Rebecca Mitchell and Dr Helen Hayden from Agriculture Victoria will be presenting. Dr Hayden has over 20 years experience working in soil biology and plant pathology in many different agricultural industries and in native ecosystems.

“Many landowners are generally aware of the soil chemical and physical constraints that can affect their paddocks and limit crop yields, but soils also have a biological component that plays an important role in soil health,” Dr Hayden said. “In the workshop we will uncover why biology is so important for healthy soil, caring for the environment and getting the best out of our farming land.” said Dr Helen Hayden

Participants will learn how to evaluate the condition of their soil and apply appropriate management practices to ensure soil health. Lunch is provided. To read more about the workshop click here Soil Health

Click here to book   SoilHealthBooking       Ring   5421 9660 or Send Email to book.

 

 

  • LEARN HOW TO MAKE NEST BOXES

Learn how to make nest boxes at this workshop organised by MRSC on Saturday 9th December

 

 

 

 

  • INVITATION TO VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION EVENT

 

 

  • AUSTRALIAN CITIZEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE

7-9 February 2018 in Adelaide -bringing together citizen science practitioners, participants, thought leaders and decision makers for the #CitSciOz18. Featuring international keynote speakers Dr. Caren Cooper and Amy Robinson Sterling, along with Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr. Alan Finkel and Eureka prize winner Dr. Emilie Ens, the aim of the conference is to showcase best practice in citizen science and share project outcomes from across Australia and the world! More information

  • UCLN CITIZEN SCIENCE PROJECT LAUNCH -MARCH 10TH NEWHAM HALL

Come along to the launch of the UCLN Citizen Science project to survey for Greater Gliders, Powerful owls and Phascogales. Learn from experts such as Senior Threatened Species Officer Todd Soderquist from NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (Formally NSW National Parks), who has a wealth of knowledge on Powerful Owls and phascogales.

 

  • RIVER RESTORATION WORKSHOP – March 18 2018, 10-2 pm, Degraves Mill Carlsruhe.

    Join wetland restoration experts Damien Cook, Elaine Bayes, Angela Gladman, and experienced Landcarers at the historic Degraves Mill to learn about successful river restoration and the concepts of biolinks. You will also learn from property owner Steve Marriot about his successful long term river restoration project.Lunch provided.

 

 

 

 

GRANTS

 

  • SMART FARMS SMALL GRANTS

Landcare groups can now apply for the Australian Government’s Smart Farm Small Grants. Small grants between $5000 – $100,000 for projects focusing on a range of topics including soil health, biodiversity, knowledge/capacity building, adaption of new practices, reducing greenhouse gases, sustainable agriculture trials and so much more!

For further information on the Smart Farms Small Grants program.
Applications close 2pm on Thursday 7 December 2017

  • CLIMATE CHANGE INNOVATION GRANTS

DELWP initiative supporting Victorian organisations to be local leaders in the development of innovative solutions to climate change challenges. $3.8M in competitive grants funding for innovation climate change mitigation and adaptation projects with a focus on regional areas. Successful projects will receive $50 – 300K in funding. Applications close 30 November. Apply here

  • NAB FOUNDATION’S ENVIRONMENTAL WELL BEING: SUSTAINABLE REGIONS GRANTS

The grants will support the development and implementation of practical on-ground community action to improve the environment, as well as programs that create regional solutions to environmental challenges  There are two types of grants available, Seed Grants which help organisations get an initiative off the ground, and Thrive Grants which provide funding to help organisations move to the next phase of growth by supporting them to reach scale or collaborate with others for impact. Three year projects, ranging from $100,000 to $1 million. Applications close 27 October. Apply here

 

  •   NORMAN WETTENHALL SMALL ENVIRONMENTAL GRANT SCHEME

The grants provide support for groups or individuals undertaking projects that will make a positive difference to the natural living environment, in land, sea or air, rural or urban.

At the moment Norman Wettenhall are looking for projects around flora and fauna conservation, threatened mammal conservation, and landscape restoration and education.

New round opens – 19 Sept 2017 – Nov 2017. (The round will be closed when the maximum number of applications has been reached.)

For further information or to apply click here – http://nwf.org.au/grants/small-environmental-grants/

 

 

RESOURCES

 

 

  • VICTORIAN LANDCARE MAGAZINE ISSUE 70

CLICK HERE LandcareMag to download Issue 70 of the Victorian Landcare Magazine. This issue features the Victorian Landcare Awards plus lots more….

 

  •  LANDLINK

Click here to read the latest Landlink publication  Landlink Nov2017

 

  • LANDCARE IN FOCUS

And for yet more Landcare news the latest Landcare in Focus can be read here : LandcareInFocus

 

  • DECEMBER NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

Click here for the latest North Central Chat NCChat

SEPTEMBER 2017

 

” Vision without action is but a dream. Action without vision is a waste of energy. But vision with action can move mountains.”

Lao-Tze

“Our vision is that instead of looking at blackberries and willows and other weeds, there will be a view that reflects the way the river environment existed before European settlement.” said Michael Kearney from Trentham and District Landcare, seen here on the Coliban River. ©Scheltema

 

Welcome to our Spring Edition of the UCLN ENews. As usual, as the chill of winter fades and the spring wildflowers appear there are many events and workshops on offer in the Landcare community, from a wonderful  talk on birdsong to an open day on Holistic Farm Management. I hope you enjoy reading about some of the UCLN member groups achievements, and find something that interests you to attend this spring in our beautiful region.

  • STUDENTS HELP RESTORE RIVER HEALTH
  • AWARDS SUCCESS
  • VISION FOR THE COLIBAN RIVER
  • NEW UCLN/ASHBOURNE BROCHURES OUT NOW
  • TYLDEN LANDCARE AIMS FOR HEALTHY LITTLE COLIBAN
  • NORTH CENTRAL LANDCARE FORUM
  • RAPTORS AT METCALF
  • WORKSHOPS AND EVENTS
  • GRANTS

 

STUDENTS HELP RESTORE RIVER HEALTH

Jaimeson and Maela from Kyneton Secondary College planting on the Campaspe River with the Campaspe River and Land Management Group on National School Trees Days. ©Scheltema

Kyneton Secondary College students took part in National School Trees Day  and joined  the Campaspe River and Land Management Group to plant about 500 trees and shrubs along the Campaspe River. Teacher Anwyn Chapman said it was a great opportunity for students to leave their desks, get outside and learn how to care for our environment. “By taking part in activities such as this, they learn about the important role nature plays in the life of our planet and why we must protect it. As Albert Einstein said, ‘Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better’.” Ms Chapman said.

More than 2500 schools get involved in School Trees Day each year, Australia’s largest tree planting and nature care event.

President of Campaspe River Land Management group Peter Harding said the group was delighted to have students from Kyneton Secondary College again helping with revegetation works along the Campapse River. “Our ongoing work along this river is helping restore the health of the Campaspe and bring back threatened species such as the hairy anchor plant.”  To read the story in the Midland Express click on Restoring River Health

 

AWARDS SUCCESS

The Victorian Landcare Awards were recently announced. We congratulate the tireless Penny Roberts for her wonderful work with  Newham Landcare  for being commended in the Australian Government Individual Landcare Award.

The inspiring Penny Roberts from Newham and District Landcare was recently commended in the Victorian Landcare Awards. She is seen here alongside one of the many projects she has initiated. ©Scheltema

 

Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio presented the awards, alongside the Governor of Victoria, Her Excellency the Honourable Linda Dessau AC and Patron-In-Chief of Landcare in Victoria. The Minister said “It’s fantastic to see such a diverse range of groups and individuals recognised for their significant contribution to the conservation of Victoria’s biodiversity. We understand the important role Landcare plays getting communities involved in the protection of our unique environment.”

To see the list of all the 2017 Victorian Landcare Awards winners, as well as those who received highly commended and commended acknowledgements, go to Victorian Winners

Go to this link for the Winners booklet to read read stories on each of the award winners Vic Winners Booklet 

 

I am pleased to announce that the UCLN was a semi finalist in the 2017 Regional Achievement and Community Awards for the Environmental Sustainability Awards. Well done to all of the volunteers who work hard to achieve their groups goals.

 

UCLN members should congratulate themselves for being Semi Finalists in the Regional Achievement and Community Awards.                                                                                                                                                                               ©Scheltema

 

VISION FOR THE COLIBAN RIVER

 

 

 Michael Kearney from Trentham and District Landcare seen here at Enders Bridge on the Coliban River, Trentham. The group has been hard at work restoring the health of the Coliban as part of their long term vision for the area.                                                        ©Scheltema

Trentham and District Landcare recently received $18,000  from the NCCMA for the continuation of weed removal and regeneration works on the Coliban River. The work is also part of the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network biolink strategy which involves seven Landcare groups in the district working together on landscape scale projects.

Michael  Keaney said this was a small part of a community effort led by Trentham and District Landcare that involved working with the NCCMA, DELWP, the Dja Dja Wurrung, Hepburn Shire Council, UCLN and private landowners. “Before this weed removal you wouldn’t even know the Coliban River was there. Our vision is that instead of looking at blackberries and willows and other weeds, there will be a view that reflects the way the river environment existed before European settlement.”

President of Upper Campaspe Landcare Network Alan Denehey said UCLN volunteers were beginning to see the fruits of the effort that went into developing their Strategic Plan.“A number of our member groups have become energised and active in developing and beginning to implement on ground works for environmental rehabilitation. It’s exciting to see Trentham Landcare continue their restoration works which align with the UCLN Biolink Strategy for the Upper Coliban Catchment. This landscape-scale effort also involves Malmsbury and Tylden Landcare working on the Coliban and Little Coliban River.”

To read media on this click on    River Gets Makeover

 

 NEW UCLN AND ASHBOURNE LANDCARE BROCHURES OUT.

As a result of a Macedon Ranges Shire Council Grant, UCLN has recently printed brochures explaining who we are and what we do. They are being distributed in places like Community Centres, Libraries, Shire Offices, Neighborhood Centres etc. If your group would like some to hand out at events please contact me. Your group could also create a single page insert with your relevant details on it. Or, if you need hep creating your own, please feel free to contact me.

 

 

Here is the recently completed excellent Ashbourne Landcare brochure.

 

 

 

 

TYLDEN LANDCARE AIMS FOR HEALTHY LITTLE COLIBAN

Thanks to a Victorian Landcare Grant Tylden Landcare has been busy carrying out river rehabilitation works along the Little Coliban River in conjunction with Bendigo TAFE students, Tylden Primary School Students and community members. The project has a clear objective: to improve the quality and extent of native vegetation along the Little Coliban River. This project also aligns with the UCLN Coliban Connections Biolink project, involving Trentham, Malmsbury and Tylden Landcare working to restore connectivity between areas of remnant vegetation .

 

TAFE students have been helping to rehabilitate the area, with students writing a management plan for the site. Tylden Primary School Students have been propagating and planting tube stock, and alongside community members helping to weed and plant along the river.

Bendigo TAFE student James Stewart helping Tylden Landcare  at the Little Coliban River “The Little Coliban River is facing threats from a lack of native vegetation and invasive species such as Crack Willow, Blackberry and Gorse. These impact river health and are a high priority to repair”. Pic Brendan Smith

Bendigo TAFE student James Stewart was at the river recently to assist with re vegetation and said – “The Little Coliban River is facing threats from a lack of native vegetation and invasive species such as Crack Willow, Blackberry and Gorse. These impact river health and are a high priority to repair”.

“This is a rehabilitation project rather than a restoration project. It will take decades to become a self-sustaining ecosystem. A local threatened species- the Hairy Anchor Plant is establishing well and bank stability has also increased”. James added.

Tylden Landcare has been prioritising woody weed control and revegetation programs to increase the density of native vegetation and encourage native fauna.

 

 

 

NORTH CENTRAL LANDCARE FORUM

 

“Sharing the Landcare Story”

Learn from the Landcare community, get new ideas, and form new contacts at the North Central Landcare Forum at St Arnauds in October. ©Scheltema

 

Registrations are open for the first regional landcare forum, co-hosted by the new peak landcare organisation in Victoria, Landcare Victoria Inc. (LVI)to be held at

Camp Seed, Stuart Mill, St Arnaud 6th – 8th October 2017.

Download the Program here

An enthusiastic band of North Central landcare members have worked with LVI to organise two full days of sharing and learning. The event will feature a poster display and discussion of landcare activities from across the region and state, and the option to join a bus trip on the Saturday afternoon. This is a great opportunity for networking within the Landcare community, and its free!

If your group wishes to share their landcare stories as part of the poster display please let me know.

Click here to register for the forum now.

The event is fully catered for and is free for landcare members and their partners. Please BYO drinks

Contact Kaye Rodden (LVI – Dep Chair) at nidgee@reachnet.com.au  for more  information.

Registrations close 27th September.

 

 

RAPTORS AT METCALF

A Southern Boobook owl, one of the Birds of Prey and Raptors from the Leigh Valley Hawk and Owl Sanctuary.  ©Scheltema

 

Ever wanted to get up close and personal to a raptor? If you come along to the Raptors Display at Metcalf after the UCLN AGM on 31st October 2017  you can. The Leigh Valley Hawk and Owl Sanctuary will give a one hour presentation introducing approximately  5 Birds of Prey and will discuss the need for conservation, prevention of extinction and sustainable living.

Meet at the Metcalf Hall at 2.15. You are also welcome to attend the UCLN AGM at 12.30.

 

 

WORKSHOPS AND EVENTS

  • Rabbit Busters – 20th October 2017, 1-3 pm, Red Brick Hall 23 Yaldwyn St west  Kyneton
    Learn  how to successfully use the new RHDV1 K5 virus to eradicate rabbits with John Mathews from DEDJTR.  Contact RabbitBook , 5421 9660 or Send Email to book.
  • Chilean Needlegrass Workshop  Saturday November 11th Carlsruhe CFA Three Chain Rd Carlsruhe  10 am  -2 pm. Learn how to identify and control this high impact agricultural and environmental weed from an agricultural scientist. Presented by Macedon Ranges Shire Council in partnership with Carlsruhe and Newham & District Landcare Groups. Lunch provided. Contact NeedleGrassBook , 5421 9660 or Send Email to book.
  • Landcare Display at the Kyneton Show – 18th November, Kyneton.
    Come along and meet fellow Landcarers and speak to the public about how to get involved in Landcare in the district. We are looking for volunteers to help with the UCLN stall so please let me know on uclandcare@gmail.com  if you are able to help.
  • Wildflower Walk 10 am 19th November. Conglomerate Gully Riddells Creek. NDLG Roadside Management Group invites members and guests to spend a couple of hours in the morning to discover the wildflowers in a  contrasting environment to that typical of the Macedon Ranges. The walk will conclude with tea and cake. Dogs are welcome on leads only. Sturdy footwear is essential. Please indicate if you are interesting in attending by contacting Sue Massie smassie@ozemail.com.au for directions.
  • Native Pastures for Grazing – 22nd November 2017, 10 -3 pm  Newham Hall.
    Learn from Greening Australia’s lead Scientist Dr Paul Gibson-Roy about native pastures for grazing. Lunch and field trip provided. Contact Pasturesbooking or Send Email to book.
  • What can we learn from listening to nature?” November 24th 2017 Evening presentation by Andrew Skeoch of Listening Earth (www.listeningearth.com ) on birds and birdsong. Newham Mechanics Institute. 7 pm for 7.30. Supper follows. RSVP to Sue Massie smassie@ozemail.com.au or tel.5427 0795.

 

 

 

  • Soil Health – Tuesday 5th December 2017, 10.30-1 pm, Langley.
    Join the experts on an olive plantation at Langley to learn how to gain a better understanding of soil on your property. Learn how to evaluate the condition of your soil and apply appropriate management practices to improve soil health.  Presenters Martin Hamilton (EcoDev DEDJTR), Rebecca Mitchell (co author of the Soil Health Guide), and Helen Haydon (Soil Microbiologist from Dep Ag Melbourne). Lunch Provided  SoilHealthBooking        5421 9660 or Send Email to book.
  • Holistic Management Open Gate Farm Tour 20th October 10.30 -3.00pm Sidonia

Come and see first hand how Sidonia Beef Farmer Sam White is using holistic management principles to  plan rotational grazing, improve soil health, grow more grass  and boost animal performance. This event  has limited numbers.To apply please complete Expression of Interest Form available at  www.gbcma.vic.gov.au or contact  Darren Bain Regional Landcare Facilitator on 03 54401893 or  0419560348 or darren.bain@nccma.vic.gov.au  . EOIs to be submitted by 10 am  Monday 25th  September.

 

 

 

  • River Restoration – March 18 2018, 10-2 pm, Degraves Mill Carlsruhe.
    Join wetland restoration experts Damien Cook, Elaine Bayes, Angela Gladman, and experienced Landcarers at the historic Degraves Mill to learn about successful river restoration and the concepts of biolinks. You will also learn from property owner Steve Marriot about his successful long term river restoration project.Lunch provided.

 

  • Wetland Ecology and Training Courses: October 2017 – March 2018

Registrations are now open for Rakali’s popular wetland courses commencing October 2017 through to March 2018. The courses are presented by SERA 2016 award winning ecologist Damien Cook and Elaine Bayes. Don’t hold off as the NEW courses may be a once off depending on level of attendance and it’s the last time the Wetland Read more..

 

 

 

  • Sustainable House Open Day

Baynton Sidonia Landcare has asked me to let you know about the upcoming Alternative Technology Association’s Sustainable House Open Day Sunday, September 17, 2017 10.00am – 4.00pm at Clearwind (between Kyneton and Heathcote).

 


  • CAMPASPE CARP CATCH DAY 15th October

If you enjoy fishing why not come along to this family friendly fishing event  organised by NCCMA .

 

 

GRANTS

Community Skills Development Grants

Lily D’Ambrosio, Minister for Energy, Environment & Climate Change recently announced the availability of $600,000 in grant funds for Community Skills Development projects. The grants are intended to enable volunteer groups and networks to invest in training and development to increase their collective skills.

In announcing the grants, the Minister said ‘A total of $600,000 is available to strengthen and support Landcare, the Friends Of network, Coastcare and other environmental volunteer groups in the important work they do. Individual groups will be eligible for $5,000 grants while networks and partnership groups will be eligible for up to $20,000.’

The Minister’s Media release can be found here communityskillsgrants and details of the grants, including the guidelines, here grantdetails/guidelines . Applications close on 12th October 2017.

 

Wettenhall Environment Trust Small Environmental Grant

The Small Environmental Grant Scheme will provide support for people undertaking projects that will make a positive difference to the natural living environment, in land, sea or air, rural or urban.
The application forms, guidelines and data required for applying can be found online at: Wettenhall grant

Victorian Rabbit Action Network Small Community Grants

The Victorian Rabbit Action Network (VRAN) has released small grants to community groups to develop and lead rabbit management action plans to better establish K5 into the future. Keep up to date with these opportunities through the VRAN website: https://rabbitaction.com/about/ 

 

 

JUNIOR LANDCARE INFO



Please click here Junior Landcare  if you are interested in Junior Landcare information.

 

 

 

September 201 7 North Cental Chat is out now click here –  Sep17Chat

This issue features an article by Regional Landcare Facilitator Tess Grieves on  “How can Landcare attract new people, and free up more time for our current, overworked members” which raises some interesting points.

 

JUNE 2017

“Very great change starts from very small conversations, held among people who care.” 

Margaret Wheatley

 

 

Winter is here and so are the fungi. ©Scheltema

Welcome to our Winter Enews. So many fantastic Landcare projects have happened because people got together and had conversations. Read about some of the great work happening in our Network in this ENews. Dont forget to have a look at resources available and some wonderful events coming up.

 

 

  • TREES FOR MUM SUCCESS
  • RIVER DETECTIVES PROGRAM BEGINS AT TRENTHAM PRIMARY SCHOOL
  • INSECT CATCHING COLLABORATION AT BALD HILL RESERVE
  • FOTCR COMPLETES THE WOMBAT LOOP.
  •  SAVE THE DATE ! BIRDS OF PREY AT THE CASCADES.
  • K5-RHDV1 FOR RABBIT CONTROL
  • EVENTS
  • AVAILABLE GRANTS
  • NEWS AND RESOURCES

 

TREES FOR MUM SUCCESS

Approximately 850 trees and other plants were planted by UCLN member groups on Mothers Day, a wonderful way to commemorate mums.

 

Woodend Landcare and the Campaspe River and Land Management Group held tree planting events along the Five Mile Creek and Campaspe River this Mothers Day. Over 850 trees were planted and lots of mums lovingly commemorated! A great effort all round. Stay tuned for a Fathers Day planting event this year. CR+LMG also planted a further 400 plants along the river on World Environment Day with students from the Kyneton Secondary College. Teacher Anwyn Chapman said “It’s so exciting seeing this wonderful tree planting relationship continuing to further improve the health of the Campapse River at Kyneton.”

Over 400 plants went in the ground at a recent planting day on the Campaspe River with Kyneton Secondary College students assisting the CRLMG.

And more news from the river at Kyneton – “Following the 22 years of work the Campaspe River and Land Management Group has put into preparing the ground for a rudimentary gravel path along the Campaspe River, council has recognised the value of The River Walk for the community. The new cement paving designed to replace the gravel along part of the existing River Walk will be constructed as part of the Council’s Healthy Community Objectives.This will enable the entire community to use The River Walk for cycling, running, walking and general enjoyment of the Campaspe River environs.” said President of the CR+LMG Peter Harding.

Well done to all volunteers in this group for guiding council’s plans for this beautiful stretch of the Campaspe River and for their continued weed removal and revegetation along the river banks

 

RIVER DETECTIVES PROGRAM BEGINS AT TRENTHAM PRIMARY SCHOOL

The excellent River Detectives program has begun at Trentham Primary School thanks to volunteer Lois Blackhirst. Said Lois  “The Trentham students are so lucky to have a stream running right past their school. Even though it looks a little muddy our school scientists found it to be a healthy waterway. We even identified a couple of waterbugs which is a sign of a living and well balanced environment”. 

 

River Detectives volunteer Lois Blackhirst helps out Cooper with a sample from Trent Creek Trentham.“River Detectives is such a valuable program that allows schools across the state to head to their local waterway, engage with their local environment and learn skills in testing water quality which they report through an interactive portal.” said Brad Drust , NCCMA CEO.

 

Malmsbury Landcare is also involved with the excellent River Detectives Program at their local Primary School.

Students  were anointed as ‘river detectives’ after they were introduced to a new program allowing them to keep track of the health of our waterways.

The keen students are now able to take readings on the water quality and the habitat from their local waterways and log the data on an interactive portal.

Through that online portal, the budding citizen scientists have been teaching themselves about waterways and the effect poor river health can have on the greater environment.

Member for Macedon Mary-Anne Thomas recently joined eager Malmsbury Primary School students to announce the expansion of Victoria’s first online waterway education tool. Mary-Anne Thomas said “The River Detectives Program is an excellent example of connecting rivers, landscapes and people, particularly our younger generation. I am excited to see the almost 5000 students heading out to monitor their local waterway and record valuable data about its health.”

For more info go to http://www.riverdetectives.net.au/

 

A student tests water quality at Trent Creek as part of the River Detectives program.

 

INSECT CATCHING COLLABORATION AT BALD HILL RESERVE

Students from Kyneton Secondary College collecting insect traps they installed at the Bald Hill Reserve. Their work is part of a joint project between MRSC, UCLN, and the Friends of Bald Hill Reserve to find out more about the food source of phascogales at the Reserve.

 

Kyneton Secondary College  students visited Bald Hill Reserve recently to collect insect traps that they installed at the reserve. The project is part of a collaboration between the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network, Macedon Ranges Shire Council and the Friends of Bald Hill Reserve to conduct field studies on insect populations, the major food source of the vulnerable phascogale which is found at Bald Hill Reserve.

The students designed, built, and installed the insect traps in order to collect data regarding the availability of the phascogales food source at Bald Hill Reserve.

Phascogales are a ‘keystone’ species at Bald Hill Reserve, which means they give an indication of the health of the ecosystem there. The destruction of native forests and woodlands in Central Victoria has led to the decline of many native animal populations, including the phascogale.

The students are trialing three different types of traps and collecting data for Macedon Ranges Shire Council environmental officer William Terry. William said “Invertebrates are the key to understanding the health of the natural environment here at the reserve. They make up a huge amount of the food resources within the reserve for our birds, mammals, reptiles and frogs. They are also important for the pollination of flowering plants –including the threatened flax lily. The students are working with council to help us determine the most effective methods for the collection of invertebrates in the reserve.”

Student Lily Wickham said “I’m enjoying studying the vulnerable phascogale and its environment. We are comparing the insect population at the reserve in areas that have been affected by fires and logging to areas that have older trees. We’re trying to work out the best way to set up a study to look at the phascogales food source.We’re also trying to  understand what the threats are to its food source.”

The students will be analyzing the data and working with a visiting entomologist to better understand the role insects play in the ecosystem at Bald Hill Reserve.

 

Sam Habib checks a insect trap students from Kyneton Secondary College installed at Bald Hill Reserve.

An exciting find was made recently at Bald Hill Reserve -a Brown Toadlet (listed under the FFG as a threatened species). It has been predicted that the Brown Toadlet is in significant decline, at a rate of less than or equal to 30% over ten years (IUCN 2006). Detection of the Brown Toadlet at Bald Hill Reserve was significant as it had not been recorded in the area for over 20 years. Lets hope the Friends of Bald Hill is successful in their recent grant application which will help this and other species.

 

An exciting find at Bald Hill -The endangered brown toadlet. Pic William Terry.

 

 

 FRIENDS OF TRENTHAM CREEKS AND RESERVES COMPLETES WOMBAT LOOP

The wonderful Wombat loop is now open, completing the Wombat Trail, an initiative of the Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves (and the Trentham Public Reserves Committee of Management).

 

The most recent group to join the UCLN, the Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves, has  overcome many hurdles to complete a long term project to create a walking track along Stoney Creek in Trentham. The 9 km trail, which links 4 reserves in Trentham now includes a previously inaccessible area of Stoney Creek, thanks to the persistent hard work of the group. Andy Robertson, a member of the FOTCR said “After two years of negotiation, planning and bloody hard work, our reward is seeing the regeneration of a weed infested, neglected, cattle damaged riparian area. We’ve now got blackwoods, garnia, lepidsperma, lomandra, and other native species regenerating.”

The group received funding three years ago through a DEWLP Local Landscape Enhancement Grant.Why not take a walk amongst the blackwoods alongside the creek this winter and enjoy this delightful trail. Brochures are available from Trentham Neighborhood Center, the Tourist Information Center and shops in town.

 

                                       

 

 

 

 

 SAVE THE DATE! BIRDS OF PREY AT THE CASCADES FOR UCLN AGM.

Come and learn about these magnificent creatures on October 31st at the UCLN AGM at Metcalf.

Save the date on October 31st and come along to our AGM event at the Cascades in Metcalf. We will be having a wonderful demonstration by the Leigh Valley Hawk and Owl Sanctuary. Their aim is to provide inspiring demonstrations based on the principals of ecology and environmental science,  emphasising the urgent need for the conservation of  biodiversity, the prevention of extinction and sustainable living. Come and learn about the adaptions these remarkable creatures utilize in their predatory way of life. More info closer to the date.

 

 

K5-RHDV1 VIRUS FOR RABBIT CONTROL

 

Learn how to effectively control rabbits using the new K5-RHDV1 virus

 

Vials of K5-RHDV1 calicivirus for release are available from the NSW Department of Primary Industries, Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute.

To order the K5 vials you just need to send an email to Alison Jugow (alison.jugow@dpi.nsw.gov.au), Ph 02 4640 6012, letting her know how many vials, delivery address and contact details.

The cost of the RHDV K5 vials is $120.00 per vial and the cost of freight is $50.00. These prices are GST exclusive.

Instructions for bait preparation and bait laying are available at  http://www.pestsmart.org.au/bait-delivery-of-rhdv/

  •  This is apparently enough to bait 10 kilos of carrots,or 5 kilos of oats
  • You then put it on the bait in a populated area (this amount might be enough for a few properties),and re bait a couple of days apart.
  • It is best not to use when rabbits are lactating -which is apparently now. They suggested starting early next autumn. It needs flies to spread it.
  • Best not use with young rabbits as they are immune to it.Best not too use spring, or summer.
  • More info on how to use at http://www.pestsmart.org.au/boosting-rabbit-biocontrol-rhdv-k5-national-release/ or contact John Matthews from Agriculture Victoria john.matthews@ecodev.vic.gov.au

The UCLN will be holding an information session with John Mathews on October 20th so put it in your diary if you want to learn more about how to effectively control rabbits on your property.

 

 

GRANTS

 

ROUND THREE 20 MILLION TREES

 

Round Three of the Australian Government’s 20 Million Trees was launched on 19 June. This is the final round of the 20 Million Trees Competitive Grants.

$6 million is available for grants between $20,000 and $100,000 for tree planting projects that will support EPBC listed Threatened Ecological Communities and Threatened Species. Individuals and groups can apply for projects on both public and private land.

Applications close: 15 August 2017.

Guidelines, application form and other useful information is available from the Australian Government’s website.

NORMAN WETTENHALL SMALL ENVIRONMENTAL GRANT SCHEME

New Round Opens 20th June 2017
The current round of Norman Wettenhall small environmental grants is now open. The grants provide support for groups or individuals undertaking projects that will make a positive difference to the natural living environment, in land, sea or air, rural or urban.
At the moment Norman Wettenhall are looking for projects around flora and fauna conservation, threatened mammal conservation, and landscape restoration and education.
New round opens – 20th June 2017 – August 2017. (The round will be closed when the maximum number of applications has been reached.)
For further information or to apply click here – http://nwf.org.au/grants/small-environmental-grants/

 

FRRR FOUNDATION FOR RURAL & REGIONAL RENEWAL – OPEN GRANTS

FRRR has a number of grants that open at different times of the year

.http://frrr.org.au/grants/2017_CPPW_grants.php

 

 

AUSTRALIAN ETHICAL INVESTMENT AND SUPER, COMMUNITY GRANTS

A community grants program that provides financial support to new, emerging or small not-for-profit organisations that contribute to humanitarian, environmental, and animal welfare efforts in Australia and abroad. Supporting projects between $10,000 – $20,000 that deliver tangible outcomes in alignment with the organisations charter.
For more information go to – https://www.australianethical.com.au/community-grants/

 

YOUNG FARMERS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

Up to $10,000 towards training or study (upskill) to invest on-farm or in professional development (invest), putting new skills into practice.
For further information go to –

SCHOLARSHIP

 THE R E ROSS TRUST GRANTS – VIC

The grants work around 4 impact areas. For Landcare groups the most relevant area is impact area D; the protection and preservation of Australian Flora and Fauna. Organisations must first submit an expression of interest for consideration by the Trustees and may then by invited to submit a full application. Applications are considered all year round. For more information go to: http://www.rosstrust.org.au/grants/apply-for-a-grant/  

 

 

EVENTS

FARM VISIT- HEMP GROWING.

  • Trentham Landcare has organised a  Farm visit on the 2nd July in the afternoon –  Bunjil Farm,licensed Hemp grower.(Please note Milking Yard Flat visit cancelled.)

Events

 

 

WETLAND ECOLOGY MANAGEMENT COURSE WITH DAMIAN COOK AND ELAINE BAYES

If you are interested in  Wetland Ecology and Management you may be interested in these courses.

Click on link below for more info.

    Two NEW Wetland Ecology and Management Units are coming up this spring

    • UNIT 1: The Wonderful Wetland Ecology Bus Tour, 12 & 13 Oct 2017 
    • UNIT 2: Wetland Restoration and Management, 16 & 17 Nov 2017 

 

 

The Wetland Plant Identification Course commencing mid October 2017

“Fantastic introduction to wetland vegetation and ecology.  If I can do the course and identify plants afterwards, anyone can! ”      

Greg Fletcher, Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority.

See website for session outline, field guide provided, evaluations etc.

For more information go to http://rakali.com.au/education-and-training

 

 

 

 

RESOURCES

 

LATEST LANDCARE LANDLINK

Landlink June2017

VICTORIAN LANDCARE AND CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT MAGAZINE

CLICK HERE to view Issue 69 of the Victorian Landcare and Catchment Management magazine, which is a special feature on climate change.

 

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

 

 

There’s lots happening in the region, even in the winter months. Click here to view the June 2017 edition of the North Central Chat and find out more about who is doing what in our region.

 

 

NEW CLIMATE CHANGE RESOURCE

The Climate Ready Natural Resource Management Planning  portal provides a common platform to access climate change adaptation planning for natural resource management across Victoria and was funded by the Australian Government.

This project developed spatial tools to assess climate change vulnerability across the state, pioneered adaptation pathways planning in the state, undertook extensive engagement with the community and key stakeholders on climate change adaptation, and produced the most comprehensive natural resource management climate change adaptation planning to date in Victoria. The work also provided guidance on carbon farming priorities within the regions.
To visit this portal, please visit http://www.nrmclimate.vic.gov.au/

Access weather and climate resources on line ©Scheltema

WEATHER AND CLIMATE RESOURCE

For short sharp seasonal forecast outlooks go to www.agriculture.vic.gov.au From there you can subscribe to The Fast Break newsletter which will give you rainfall and temperature predictions as well as other information.It also has links to monthly YouTube clips summarizing Victorian rainfall and giving seasonal outlooks.The YouTube clips cover stored soil moisture levels, crop growing conditions and the latest climate risk information for Victoria. In a recent survey 90% of farmers said these resources had improved their ability to manage seasonal variability and risk.

 

NOT-FOR-PROFIT LAW TRAINING WEBINARS

Not-for-profit Law regularly runs webinars on a variety of topics that affect community organisations. You can attend this training using your computer from wherever you may be located. Registering for each webinar is essential. For more information or to register click here – webinars. Slides from previous sessions are also available.

Working with Volunteers – Key Legal Issues! – Wednesday 5 July
This webinar will cover the key legal issues your organisation needs to consider when working with volunteers and other types of unpaid workers, and give you some useful tools and tips on how to meet your obligations.

 

 

 

 

 

April 2017

  • PLANT A TREE FOR MUM
  • METCALF LANDCARE CARES FOR CASCADES
  • SENIOR CONSERVATION BOTANIST AT BLACK HILL RESERVE
  • UCLN MEMBER GROUPS JOIN FORCES ON BIOLINK PROJECT
  • PLANTING BEGINS AT TRENT CREEK
  • TYLDEN GORSE CONTROL FIELD DAY
  • GRANT OPPORTUNITIES
  • EVENTS
  • NORTH CENTRAL CHAT AND MORE

Welcome to our April ENews. It’s wonderful to see the beautiful autumn colors  in the Central Highlands, and the recent heavy rains have soaked the ground well for the planting many of you will be doing at this time of the year.This ENews has lots of fantastic events plus news from our member groups and grant opportunities.

“Very great change starts from very small conversations, held among people who care.”  said Margaret Wheatley. I know many of you are translating those conversations into action on the ground, creating a better environment for all of us.

PLANT A TREE FOR MUM THIS MOTHERS DAY

Plant a tree this Mothers Day to honour your mum.You can join in with Woodend Landcare or the Campaspe River and land Management groupon the 14th May.

What better way to honour your mum this Mothers Day than to leave a living legacy in the form of an indigenous plant.

You can do so by joining in with either Woodend Landcare or the Campaspe Land and River Management Group on the 14th May.Bring waterproof shoes and gloves.

KYNETON

WHERE: Kyneton Botanic Gardens ( enter KBG via tourist dr off Mollison st, drive 200 mtrs to where cars parked.Walk towards Railway Wier 200 mtrs downstream Mollison St bridge.Follow signs.)
WHEN:Sunday 14th May 9.30 to 12.00pm (stay for 30 mins or 2 hours).
MORNING TEA PROVIDED TO SUSTAIN PLANTERS AND MAINTAIN ENERGY!

contact Peter Harding 0419625600 for more info

WOODEND

WHERE:Lake Earnshaw,behind Gilbert Gordon Oval
WHEN:Sunday 14th May 9am -12 pm

contact Angela Van Dam for more info on 0409 373 010.

 

METCALF LANDCARE CARES FOR CASCADES

The beautiful Cascades,where Metcalf Landcare has been removing woody weeds. ©Scheltema

Metcalf Landcare has been busy improving the health of the beautiful Coliban River at the Cascades by  undertaking ongoing woody weed removal and creating habitat and  nest boxes for phascogales.

“The Cascades are special to the Metcalfe locals and visitors “in the know”, with its massive granitic rocks and the seasonal ebbs and flow of the Coliban.  After heavy rains it becomes an awesome torrent.  At quieter times it a favorite swimming and children-safe play area.  It offers shade, sandy spots and picnic areas.
The Metcalfe Landcare Group tackle the endemic woody weeds and willows to allow native trees and grasses to flourish.  The Group has already won grant monies to clear weeds and this year is beginning to replant the Cascades proper and extend the area of restoration downstream towards the bridge, working with willing property owners on the way.” said Metcalf Landcare President Michael Nott.

Metcalf Landcare secretary Deb Farmer on the banks of the Coliban River. The group is mapping and planning weed removal including gorse seen here on the riverbanks.                                                                                                             ©Scheltema

 

SENIOR CONSERVATION BOTANIST AT BLACK HILL RESERVE

Hear from senior conservation botanist at Royal Botanic Gardens  Neville Walsh at Black Hill Reserve on native plant recovery post fires.                                                                                                           ©Scheltema

 

This is a rare opportunity to hear from a leading authority on native plant recovery.

WHAT : SENIOR CONSERVATION BOTANIST PRESENTING AUDIO VISUAL / WALK AND TALK AT BLACK HILL RESERVE
WHEN: 10 am WALK AND TALK BLACK HILL RESERVE 2.30 – 4.00 pm KYNETON MECHANICS HALL  SATURDAY 13TH MAY
WHERE: BLACK HILL RESERVE ROTUNDA 10 am, KYNETONS MECHANICS HALL 2.30PM 

Neville Walsh,  Senior Conservation Botanist at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, will talk to the Friends of Black Hill regarding post fire recovery and other matters.

Neville will talk about recovery of various plant species from fire, especially high-plains and alpine tree species after the fires 15 years ago, as well as unusual species that only appear post-fire.

Neville started working at the National Herbarium of Victoria in 1977.

He has worked on recovery strategies for endangered species

  • genus Pomaderrisin the family Rhamnaceae,
  • buttercup family (Ranunculaceae),
  • grasses (Poaceae),
  • the Boronia family (Rutaceae),
  • the daisy family (Asteraceae),
  • Lobelia and its Australian relatives in the Campanulaceae.

He is a member of the recovery team for the endangered Helmeted Honeyeater. He co-edited the 4-volume “Flora of Victoria.”  (Every home should have one)

Neville manages the Victorian Conservation Seedbank since 2005.He specialises in the taxonomy and ecology of alpine species is seeking to understand the nature of invasion of non-native species in alpine areas around the world.

An impressive number of Australian plant species like Pomaderris Walshii  strut their stuff with his name attached .

Please contact Alan Todd at  alan_todd@westnet.com.au or 0400502325 for more info.

Learn how native species are recovering from the Black Hill fires.                                                        Pic Scheltema

UCLN MEMBER GROUPS JOIN FORCES ON BIOLINK PROJECT.

Seven Landcare groups within the UCLN are working together to protect biodiversity on two biolink projects:the Coliban Connections and the Cobaw Campaspe Connections. President of the UCLN Alan  Denehy and Woodend President Kate Daniel are seen here at the Coliban Connections biolink area.                                                                                    ©Scheltema

 

 

Progress is continuing on the UCLN Biolink projects  seven Landcare groups (Ashbourne, Malmsbury, Trentham, Tylden, Carlsruhe, Woodend and Newham)beginning planning.

The groups aim is to restore connectivity between areas of remnant vegetation so as to create corridors for the movement and protection of indigenous plants and animals.

President of UCLN, Alan Denehey, said they were trying to reverse the degradation of the natural environment that had occurred in the past.

“We are trying to slow that down, reverse it, repair it.We will be identifying and finding focal species.Given that we are trying to revegetate and create interconnected wildlife corridors, we are keen to engage landowners in our aim of creating native vegetation corridors as part of these landscape scale projects.We see this as a win for the environment and for the landowners through improved property amenity and farm efficiency.”

For the latest media on this project go to biolink. and Advocate.

 

 PLANTING BEGINS AT TRENT CREEK

On a cold and blustery day in Trentham this week when the mercury didn’t rise much over 7 degrees 40 primary school students, teachers and parents from Trentham Primary School joined forces with the Friends Of Trentham Creeks and Reserves to plant over 180 indigenous plants  at Trent Creek.

The children had a great time getting muddy whilst planting and learning  about the importance of protecting the riparian health of our environment.

Friends Of Trentham Creeks and Reserves received funds recently as a result of the Regional Riparian Action Plan Program to clear weeds and plant in the area.  The area has two species listed as ‘rare’ in Victoria –  the  Brooker gum –Euccalyptus brookeriana , and the Floodplain Fireweed -Senecio campylocarpus, and riparian forest (EVC18) listed as vulnerable in the Central Highlands Bioregion.

FOTCR   Convenor Jan Robertson said “We, the Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves, had a great time working along side the Trentham Primary School students.Their enthusiasm was well supported by school staff and parent volunteers.Having washed 40 pairs of small -size gardening gloves and dozens of hand -tools, my laundry smells like a damp swamp, but I will happily put the equipment  away for next  time.”

Trentham Primary School students help the Friends of Trentham Creeks and Reserves to plant the riparian area alongside Trent Creek.                                                                                                                                                              ©Scheltema

 

TYLDEN GORSE CONTROL FIELD DAY

Participants at the Tylden Landcare Gorse Control Field Day learn about effective gorse control.                                             ©Scheltema

Tylden Landcare  recently held a Field Day   to inform property owners about the Victorian Gorse Task Force Program and demonstrate  a gorse grooming machine with integrated herbicide application.Participants were interested to watch how the Ecoblade (operated by Regional Vic Farm Services), cuts, mulches and poisons gorse and other woody weeds.

They learnt the advantages and disadvantages of the works and how different tools can be used in the rehabilitation of our local paddocks and landscapes.

President of Tylden Landcare Brnedan Smith said ‘The aim of today is to demonstrate  effective and efficient long term gorse control and to ensure better environmental and economic outcomes. Gorse is a weed of national significance and also a regionally controlled weed, meaning landowners and managers are responsible for its control. This program allows governments,communities and landowners to work together on  gorse control.”

“Tylden Landcare has secured funding from the Victorian Gorse Task Force of $19,500.We hope to control roughly 9 hectares of gorse infestation in the Tylden area.”

The Field Day was held on the 148 acre property of John Ford. “We met Brendan at the farm gate -he was a gorse evangelist! He spoke about the program and the 50 % rebate and told us about an information session at Tylden Hall with Tylden Landcare. I went along  and thought  – this is a fast and effective way to get rid of gorse.This is a daunting patch of about 2 hectares infestation.We are addressing it under this program and are paying half the cost of the gorse eradication as a result of this grant.” said John.

Property owner John Ford watches the Ecoblade treat gorse on his property  at the Tylden Landcare Gorse Field Day.                                                                                                                                                                                                           ©Scheltema

 

 

GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

  • The Macedon Ranges 2017 Community Funding Scheme for grants of up to $6000.But hurry,it closes May 1st!   Info here – MRSC  If you’re wishing to apply for funding for an event or festival,  refer to Council’s Events & Festivals Grant Program.If you have a community project which requires funding of $1,500 or less don’t forget about MRSC Small Community Grants Scheme which is open all year and involves a simple online application process.
  •  Landcare Australia’s Sustainable Agriculture Grants 2017. All the information can be found at: sustainableaggrants.
  • The Victorian Government has recently released Protecting Victoria’s Environment – Biodiversity 2037,For more information or to view the new biodiversity plan visit  https://www.environment.vic.gov.au/biodiversity/biodiversity-plan  .
  • It has also announced $1 million in funding for Community & Volunteer Action Grants.Grants will support communities in efforts to conserve their local biodiversity and threatened species.The Community & Volunteer Action Grants are offering funding for projects between $5,000 and $50,000.More information →  Applications close 10th May.
    Said the Minister for Energy,Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio.“This is a blueprint for how we can work together to stop the decline of Victoria’s unique biodiversity.We’re supporting a broad range of rehabilitation efforts by community and volunteer groups that will improve the resilience of our native plants and wildlife. We’ve fulfilled another election commitment to institute a state wide biodiversity strategy to protect our habitats for future generations.”

However whilst our governments announces its latest biodiversity strategy Australia has quietly added 49  species to the threatened and endangered lists.

Read more here – 49morespecies

  •  Patagonia Environmental Grants

Round 1 Closes: 30 April 2017
Round 2 Closes: 31 August 2017
About:
Patagonia funds only environmental work. They are most interested in making grants to organisations that identify and work on the root causes of problems and that approach issues with a commitment to long-term change. Because Patagonia believe that the most direct path to real change is through building grassroots momentum, their funding focuses on organisations that create a strong base of citizen support. Grants typically range between $2,500 – $15,000.

Info: For more information, visit the Patagonia website

  • Suez Community Grants

Applications Close: 5 May 2017

About:
SUEZ believe strong communities build a better future for us all. Since 2013, the SUEZ Community Grants program has provided more than $400,000 to inspiring organisations and projects across Australia. They offer individual grants of up to $15,000 to fund social and environmental projects that contribute to a stronger community and healthier environment.

Info: For more information, visit the Suez Community Grants website

EVENTS

There is a wonderful array of events coming up. Dont forget to check our events calendar on our website if you forget what is on where .http://www.uppercampaspelandcare.org.au/calendar/

BIRDS OF PREY AT GLENLYON

This is a wonderful opportunity to see Birds of Prey at a Glenlyon Landcare event.See flyer below:

 

 

 

 

LINKING LANDSCAPES SYMPOSIUM

For those groups working on biolink projects dont miss this LINKING LANDSCAPES SYMPOSIUM , organised by  Central Victorian Biolinks.

 

 

 

BALD HILL GEOLOGY EVENT
 
The Friends of Bald Hill Reserve, together with the North Central Catchment Management Authority (CMA), invite you to join them for a morning with renowned geologist, Phil Dyson. Phil will give an informative presentation and lead a walk to explore the geological features of the reserve.
Saturday 27 May 
9.30am-12.30pm
Bald Hill Reserve
281 Pipers Creek Road, Kyneton

PROTECT YOUR PATCH WORKSHOP 

 

Are you looking for some assistance to help improve the biodiversity values of your rural property? Speakers from Trust for Nature, Land for Wildlife and the Victorian Government’s native vegetation offsets program will answer your questions about the financial incentives and support available to help you protect your bush block.

Organised by Macedon Ranges Shire Council and the North Central Catchment Management Authority with funding support from the Australian Government.

Dates & Times

Tue 23 May | 7:00PM – 8:30PM

Contact

Contact:
Laura Jordan/Donna Liddicoat
Organiser:
Macedon Ranges Shire Council and the North Central Catchment Management Authority
Email:
environment@mrsc.vic.gov.au
Telephone:
5421 9660

Book now

 

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT AND MORE

 

CLICK HERE to view the April 2017 edition of the North Central Chat. This month’s edition features information, Landcare stories and upcoming events.

 

To see our region’s Landcare report card 2015-16 from Tess Grieves, our Regional Landcare Coordinator, CLICK HERE. It features our very own Malmsbury Landcare.

To read the latest Landcare in Focus go to  Landcare In Focus.

To read the latest Landline go to  landlink

For serrated tussock information from the Victorian Serrated Tussock Working Party go to https://www.facebook.com/serratedtussock

The release of the RHDV1 – K5 (Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus) took place on 6 March 2017. Agriculture Victoria are coordinating the release of the virus in Victoria.
The link below has some videos on RHDV1 – K5 and rabbit control in general.

More information: go to the Pest Smart website http://www.pestsmart.org.au/boosting-rabbit-biocontrol-rhdv-k5-national-release/ or contact John Matthews from Agriculture Victoria john.matthews@ecodev.vic.gov.au

And finally, for those of you that despise feral cats and the damage they cause here is a good article on  getting rid of them…..

FEBRUARY 2017

  • GRANT SUCCESS WITHIN UCLN
  • TRENTHAM  DISTRICT LANDCARE
  • CAMPASPE VALLEY LANDCARE WEED WARRIORS
  • PIPERS CREEK LANDCARE
  • PROPERTY PLANNING WORKSHOP
  • CHILD SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
  • NORTH CENTRAL CHAT
  • PHOTOVOICE FOR WEEDS AND RABBITS
  • REVIEW OF FLORA AND FAUNA GUARANTEE ACT
  • CLIMATE READY REVEGETATION GUIDE
  • CSIRO GUIDE FOR MONITORING REVEGETATION
  • TWO APPS TO KEEP YOU SAFE, SUSTAINABILITY FESTIVAL.
"The future of life on earth depends on our ability to take action." David Attenborough Pic Scheltema

“The future of life on earth depends on our ability to take action.”  David Attenborough                                        Pic Scheltema

 

Welcome to the February edition of our ENews. I hope you have all had a safe and relaxing Christmas and an enjoyable summer.

As David Attenborough said  “The future of life on earth depends on our ability to take action. Many individuals are doing what they can, but real success can only come if there’s a change in our societies and our economics and our politics….Surely we have a responsibility to leave for  future generations a planet that is healthy, inhabitable for all species.” A big thank you to all those Landcarers out there working hard to improve the health of their patch. For those of you involved in revegetation projects, make sure you check out the great guides at the bottom of the ENews. You may wish to visit the UCLN stall at the Macedon Ranges Sustainability Festival on the 4th March.

 

GRANT SUCCESS WITHIN UCLN

 

The UCLN will continue with its work on the Biolink projects,identifying focal species such as the Powerful Owl,seen here. Pic Scheltema

The UCLN will continue with its work on the Biolink projects, identifying focal species such as the Powerful Owl, seen here. Pic Scheltema

UCLN was successful with its 2016-17 Community Grants application.  The funding  will enable work to continue  on its biolink projects; the Coliban Corridor and the Cobaw Campaspe Connections. It will enable the Network to continue building on connectivity to enhance biodiversity in the two biolinks.

Using the Action Plans  completed as a result of last year’s grant  (which can be seen on our website here – Action Plans ), ecologists will be engaged to develop an inventory of focal species, such as the Powerful Owl and Phascogale, and provide advice on their habitat requirements, and threats.

A least one field day will be held to involve the community in the ecological assessments. The work is designed to support the progress of the ‘clusters’ of the UCLN member groups as they move towards the goal of landscape-scale habitat repair and expansion.

UCLN President Alan Denehey said “This year’s project, which follows on from the goals of our Strategic Plan and the excellent community engagement activities of last year, aims to extend the knowledge of our members and support their efforts as they plan and scope landscape restoration projects”.

 

Congratulations also to Malmsbury Landcare for receiving funding for it’s long-running Reclaim the Channel Reserve project.

“The centerpiece of that project is a walking path that takes in the magnificent Malmsbury viaduct, the largest stone bridge in the southern hemisphere,” North Central Catchment Management Authority regional Landcare co-ordinator Tess Grieves said.

 
Along with other members of Malmsbury District Landcare Rob Burdett and John Walters, seen above, are working on a long term project -'Reclaim the Reserve', to remove weeds, plant native vegetation and continue creating a walking track near the Malmsbury Viaduct. Pic Scheltema

Along with other members of Malmsbury District Landcare Rob Burdett and John Walters, seen above, are working on a long term project -‘Reclaim the Reserve’, to remove weeds, plant native vegetation and continue creating a walking track near the Malmsbury Viaduct.                         Pic Scheltema

Ms Grieves said this was the most successful grants round ever for the region, with 92 per cent of applicants successful.

“That goes to show our Landcare groups are really on the ball and focused on the environmental projects that are important to their communities,” she said.

Other successful UCLN member groups were:

  • Ashbourne Landcare Group for biolink matrix demonstration sites.
  • Carlsruhe Landcare to replenish and revegetate biolink one and two.

Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio congratulated the local groups on their projects.

“The Victorian Landcare program is an investment in our future and it’s fantastic to see these local groups receiving grants to support their important environmental projects,” she said.

 

TRENTHAM DISTRICT LANDCARE

Trentham Landcare was also a successful recipient of a Hepburn Shire Community Grant to continue with their work removing weeds and planting native vegetation in the vicinity of  the historic Enders Bridge.

Trentham Landcare was delighted to recieve news that they were succesful in a Hepburn Shire Community Grant to continue their work in weed removal and native plantings at the Historic Enders Bridge. Pic Scheltema

Trentham Landcare was delighted to receive news that they were successful in a Hepburn Shire Community Grant to continue their work in weed removal and native plantings at the Historic Enders Bridge. Pic Scheltema

 

Members of Trentham Landcare recently enjoyed a  summer early morning  walk with bird expert Tanya Loos, from Connecting Country, to do a bird count on a property  on the edge of the Wombat Forest. Eighteen species of birds were observed.

“What was special for me was the quality of the habitat. When you retain diversity in the understorey and have mature trees you will also attract a diversity in the birdlife. To start with a stunning pair of obliging Gang Gang Cockatoos and end with a White-necked heron in shimmering breeding plumage are great signs of how well this property is supporting a wide variety of birds. It made for a fantastic morning with passionate Landcare members. ” said Trentham Landcare member Kent Burgess, seen below.

 

Trentham Landcare members at a recent event to identify birds on a property at the edge of the Wombat Forest. Pic Scheltema

Trentham Landcare members Kent Burgess and Jessica Roberts at a recent event to identify birds on a property at the edge of the Wombat Forest. Pic Scheltema

 

CAMPASPE VALLEY LANDCARE WEED WARRIORS

Do you or your group need help identifying and managing Texas and Chilean Needle grass? Campaspe Valley Landcare has produced an excellent ‘Ute Guide’ to use out in the field which can help with the difficult task of identifying this weed, which is fast becoming a problem in the district. The guide is now available online on our website needle-grass-web-LR (1) . Or if you would like the booklet please contact Barbara James on 0458590642 or archiemcleod@gmail.com

THERE IS ALSO A NEW SERRATED TUSSOCK APP TO HELP YOU IDENTIFY THIS PESKY WEED

The Victorian Serrated Tussock Working Party (VSTWP) have developed its first App, which is guides landowners and managers through the process of how to identify serrated tussock.

The App is available through all smart-phones, tablets and computers and enables users to scroll through a series of screens that outline the important features to look for when attempting to identify serrated tussock (Nassella trichotoma). The App also features the Australia wide distribution of serrated tussock and allows users to move the interactive map around and see a time lapse over the past few decades.

The ID App can be accessed through the VSTWP website at http://www.serratedtussock.com/idapp or by clicking on the ‘Identification App’ icon on our website homepage: www.serratedtussock.com

 

 Using the excellent Ute Guide produced by Campaspe Valley Landcare to ID the troublesome weed. Pic Scheltema

Using the excellent Ute Guide produced by Campaspe Valley Landcare to ID the troublesome weed. Pic Scheltema

Campaspe Valley Landcare does a wonderful job on controlling weeds in their area, with the help of the Mt Alexander Shire grants. They have an ongoing commitment to eradicating many weeds in their district and have advised the Shire for many years on roadside weeds over an area covering about 25 km. They also work in partnership with DELWP on gorse eradication on Back Creek (a tributary of the Campaspe River) with funding also provided from the Gorse Task Force.

 

Weed warriors Phillip Don, Barbara James and John Stuwe from Campaspe Valley Landcare. Pic Scheltema

Weed warriors Phillip Don, Barbara James and John Stuwe from Campaspe Valley Landcare. Pic Scheltema

Their members volunteer their time and equipment on neighboring properties to manage the spread of weeds. Says member Phillip Don “I’d like to do today what others wont, so the weed problem doesn’t become too big tomorrow.”  Another member, botanist John Stuwe, is compiling  plant lists from the area which will be used for future regeneration projects and for the protection of rare and endangered species. A great example of a Landcare group really making a difference in their area!

PIPERS CREEK LANDCARE

Another group that has done a terrific job managing weeds, particularly gorse, in their area is Pipers Creek and District Landcare. They have just welcomed Charlotte Blair as their new President. Said previous President Peter Sporle “I am handing over the reins to a new generation because the demographic in Landcare is rapidly aging. The successful groups are very family orientated now. We’re excited to have a new family join our group and take on  executive roles.”

New president Charlotte said “It’s important for the children to understand about sustainability.We want to learn about indigenous plants and animals, whats a weed, and how to care for the land. The demographics are changing, there are a lot of people coming from the city, a lot of new families. We’d like to help educate new landowners how to look after and sustain the land.” Welcome Charlotte! Its exciting seeing new generations taking on Peters slogan – ‘Landcare – I Care!’.

 

Former Pipers Creek President Peter Sporle hands over the reins to new President Charlotte Blair,seen here with sons Harrison and Pic Scheltema

Former Pipers Creek President Peter Sporle hands over the reins to new President Charlotte Blair, seen here with sons Harrison and Jamie.                                                                                                                       Pic Scheltema

 

PROPERTY PLANNING WORKSHOP

This workshop booked out a month before the RSVP date of 10th March but keep your eyes out for similar ones to be offered in the next year – they are a great resource for new Landowners and Landcare owners. Former attendee Sally White said: “The biggest thing I got out of it was to be responsible as a landowner.We need to be accountable for our land and these courses give us help to achieve that.”

Property Planning poster-EMAIL (1)_edited-1

 

CHILD SAFETY REQUIREMENTS

Many groups will now be aware of the the new legislation regarding Child Safety and that we are obliged to abide by them. Some groups within our network already have done so. For those that havent, it is a simple process.

There are a few simple steps that your groups can take now as a minimum standard

  • Create a Statement of Commitment to child safety, to be documented in your constitution, minutes, website etc. E.g. “The XXXX Landcare group are committed to providing a child safe environment and being a Child Safe organisation in accordance with the Victorian Child Safe Standards”
  • A further step might be some supporting principles such as “The XXXX Landcare Group has zero tolerance of child abuse” “The XXXX Landcare Group will ensure all new volunteers are aware of our commitment to child safely when they are welcomed into the group”
  • An Action Statement will assist your members to know exactly what to do should any issue arise and for reporting any suspected abuse e.g. “The XXXX Landcare Group will comply with Victorian Law by contacting the police in any instance that abuse toward Children is suspected or witnessed”
  • If you produce OHS/ Hazard Risk Assessments or Plans before your events, consider adding a line in specifically for the Safety of Children e.g. “This event is open to the general public, therefore parents are advised that their children remain their responsibility at all times”
  • If working with schools, think about making the Standards part of the conversation with the teacher in charge when you’re planning the logistics of the activity e.g. “What do we both need to do to ensure this activity/event/session provides a child safe environment?”

FOR MORE INFO ON HOW TO ABIDE BY THE REGULATIONS GO TO  Child Safety  AND LOOK FOR REPORT TITLED CHILD SAFETY.

 

Landcare groups are now required to comply with new child safety measures. Pic Scheltema

Landcare groups are now required to comply with new child safety measures.                                              Pic Scheltema

 

 

NORTH CENTRAL CHAT

The first 2017 edition of the North Central Chat is out; featuring upcoming events, Landcare related news for community groups and information on several Shire grant rounds that are about to open, go to  Chat  (9 Mb download)

 

PHOTOVOICE FOR WEEDS AND RABBITS

Join in a Victoria-wide photovoice initiative to guide future community action and investment on widely established invasive species. The Victorian Government, in collaboration with community pest management groups for blackberry, gorse, serrated tussock and rabbits, is undertaking a Systems Mapping Study. The study uses photovoice to feature your stories and experiences. Images can help us to better understand each other’s stories, offering a fresh look at the longstanding community issue. Stories may be up to 300 words, and will be accepted until 31 March 2017.

Create your image+story in response to the following questions.

  • What motivates your efforts to control blackberry, gorse, serrated tussock or rabbits?
  • What hinders your efforts to control blackberry, gorse, serrated tussock or rabbits and how do you overcome the hindrance?
  • What are your ideas for community action to control blackberry, gorse, serrated tussock or rabbits?

For further information  and to submit your image+story visit weedsandrabbits.com/about.

 

 REVIEW OF THE FLORA AND FAUNA GUARANTEE ACT

Pic Scheltema

Pic Scheltema

Victorians are encouraged to have their say on the review the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 to ensure it better protects our biodiversity.

The Act has been in place for nearly thirty years, but this has coincided with a decline in Victoria’s biodiversity.

A consultation paper has been prepared to seek the community views on the Act and how it could be improved by incorporating improvements in our knowledge of native flora and fauna.

Community feedback is vital to ensuring that changes to the Act reflect how we can work together to protect Victoria’s unique plants and animals.

The consultation paper and information on making a submission is available at:

www.engage.vic.gov.au/review-flora-and-fauna-guarantee-act-1988.

 Consultation closes on 13 March 2017

The review aligns with the other major biodiversity initiatives including the draft biodiversity plan Protecting Victoria’s Environment – Biodiversity 2036, and the review of the native vegetation clearing regulations.

 

CLIMATE READY REVEGETATION GUIDE

The new Climate-ready revegetation: A guide for natural resource managers is available to assist natural resource managers work with the uncertainties associated with climate change when planning revegetation activities. CLICK HERE to go to the website, where you can also download a PDF version of the guide.

 

SEEKING GROWLERS!

Searching for growling grass frogs. Pic Scheltema

Searching for growling grass frogs. Pic Scheltema

The Growling Grass Frog  is   threatened in Victoria. Dan Gilmore from Biosis is seeking Growling Grass Frog habitat sites (*not already under a covenant) to offset a project in Melbourne. If your group or anyone you know has a Growling Grass Frog site (including creek lines, farm damns, drainage lines etc) on their property which they may be willing to covenant with compensation through Biosis’s process, please contact Dan on 0428 108 379 or at dgilmore@biosis.com.au.

CLICK HERE for more information on Growling Grass Frogs, or CLICK HERE to visit the Biosis website.

 

NEW GUIDE FROM CSIRO FOR MONITORING YOUR RESTORATION EFFORTS

Thank you to Connecting Country for sharing the information below.

In the spirit of sharing useful information for people involved and interested in conservation and land management, we’ve recently been made aware that the CSIRO have released their fantastic guide, ‘Checking for Change: A practical guide to checking whether sites newly managed for conservation are on track to improve’.  CLICK HERE to view this free guide Read more…

TWO APPS TO HELP KEEP YOU SAFE THIS SUMMER

  • The new VicEmergency app provides access to warnings and incidents for fires, floods, storms, earthquakes and water safety. The VicEmergency app replaces the FireReady app and is now available from the App Store or Google Play.
  • The Emergency + App is a fantastic app to have on your phone.It works when there is no phone reception, and will connect you directly to police, S.E.S or Fire Services whilst giving your GPS location.Very handy when you are out of range and have been bitten by a snake, as happened recently at a Landcare Planting event. Remember NOT TO MOVE if that happens.

MACEDON RANGES SUSTAINABILITY FESTIVAL 4th March 9am – 3pm

UCLN will be having a stall in conjunction with Woodend and Ashbourne Landcare groups at the Macedon Ranges Sustainability Festival on the 4th March.We would love to see you there!

In previous years the festival has attracted visitors from the Macedon Ranges, Central Victoria and Melbourne, and hosted 60+ exhibitors, speakers and demonstrators. The aim of the festival is to showcase ideas, products and practical solutions that will inspire and inform visitors so they can enjoy living more sustainably. The concept of this year’s festival is ‘Resilience – Building a Sustainable Community’.

The 2017 MRSLF has confirmed Simon Corbell, the Victorian Government’s new Renewable Energy Advocate, as key speaker on the Victorian Renewable Energy Targets (VRET) and its potential impacts on the renewable energy sector in our region.

 

DECEMBER 2016

  • SUMMARY OF UCLN ACTIVITIES FOR 2016
  • AVAILABLE GRANTS
  • STAY SAFE THIS SUMMER

WISHING ALL LANDCARERS AND FRIENDS A SAFE AND HAPPY XMAS!

 

 

Seasons Greetings to All.

Seasons Greetings to All.

 

 

Somehow it is almost Christmas and another year has past.A big thank you to all those Landcarers for looking after our Environment. As Anthropologist Margaret Mead said many years ago – “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

 

 UCLN ACHIEVEMENTS IN 2016

The Upper Campase Landcare Network has had a busy year. Some of our main achievements have been:

  • Two Field Days which engaged indigenous elders, highly regarded ecologists, and landcare “heroes” to explain concepts of connectivity and biolinks, and to speak about restoring and repairing Landscapes. Examples of Landcare success projects were shown.
  • Two ‘cluster groups’ formed within the Network, meaning landcare groups are joining forces to work across  boundaries on biolink projects. The two projects are: The Coliban Corridor and the Cobaw Connections. These projects will help develop the capacity of the Landcare groups to work strategically and collaboratively across these priority areas which were identified in the UCLN Strategic Plan.
Trentham and Malmsbury Landcare groups Presidents Patricia Scheltus and John Walters,discuss the Coliban Corridor project with Trentham member Shirley Proctor.

Trentham and Malmsbury Landcare group Presidents Patricia Scheltus and John Walters, discussing the Coliban Corridor project with Trentham member Shirley Proctor.

  • Two Action Plans produced by Dr Sophie Bickford, which further explore ways of restoring connectivity in these two areas to achieve greater ecological outcomes and improve habitat for threatened species and ecological communities.
  • A New Partnership formed with Kyneton Secondary College Students and UCLN. The students have been working with The Kyneton River and Land Management Committee to plant threatened species along the Campaspe River. They have also been installing nest boxes and remote cameras to monitor phascogales and gliders at the Bald Hill Reserve.

 

Kyneton Secondary College Students join forces with UCLN.

Kyneton Secondary College Students join forces with UCLN.

  • Three successful Workshops – Rabbit Busters,Weed Busters and Soil Health. These workshops, all attended by over thirty people, helped landowners gain a better understanding of ways of dealing with rabbit and weed problems.Participants to the Soil Health Workshop learnt how to evaluate the condition of their soil and improve it.
The UCLN hosted three workshops on Weed Management,Rabbit Control and Soil Health.

The UCLN hosted three workshops on Weed Management,Rabbit Control and Soil Health.

  • A new group – The Friends Of Trentham Creeks and Reserves, has joined the Network, and with the help of the Network has recently received a Victorian Government Riparian Grant to begin restoring Trent Creek,a tributary of the Coliban. Students from Trentham Primary School will be involved in the project.
  • Water Watch Program begun at Trentham Primary School
  • 16 Articles in the Media regarding UCLN and member group activities.
  • UCLN Gorse Task Force grant implemented. This project targeted gorse on seven private properties and achieved approximately eight hectares of control. The project focused on private land areas with an emphasis on controlling resprouting gorse burnt in the Black Hill fire. The Langley Landcare members also carried out an assessment using a weed prioritization formula that identified gorse as a high priority following fire. The  project aimed to control gorse,encourage native vegetation growth and protect grazing production.
  • Submissions made by UCLN to Victorian Environmental Assessment Council (VEAC) and Hepburn Shire Biodiversity Strategy.The Environment Minister asked VEAC to investigate the values of forests in the central west of Victoria, including the Wombat Forest. The purpose of the investigation is to : (a) identify and evaluate the condition, natural and cultural values and the current uses of public land in the specified area; and (b) make recommendations for the balanced use and appropriate management arrangements to conserve and enhance the natural and cultural values.UCLN advocated for  protecting the important biodiversity values in the Wombat Forest, including the many threatened species, before they are lost to us.We also had input into the Hepburn Shire Biodiversity Strategy,which is being done by Deakin University.

 

Woodend Landcare Treasurer Kate Daniel identifying precious grasslands for protection.

Woodend Landcare Treasurer Kate Daniel identifying precious grasslands for protection.

 

AVAILABLE GRANTS:

Citizen Science Grants
Citizen Science Grants is an element of the Inspiring Australia – Science Engagement Programme. It provides grants on a competitive basis to support community participation in scientific research projects that have a national impact. Closes on 17 February 2017. Read more

Norman Wettenhall Small Environmental Grant Scheme
The Small Environmental Grant Scheme provides support for groups or individuals undertaking biodiversity conservation projects in Australia. Projects of up to $10,000 based on monitoring, recording and sharing data, delivering community education, providing community capacity building (training), research and science, or landscape restoration and education. Grant round opens 20 December.  Read more

 

STAY SAFE THIS SUMMER -NEW VIC EMERGENCY APP LAUNCHED.

The new VicEmergency app provides access to warnings and incidents for fires, floods, storms, earthquakes and water safety. The VicEmergency app replaces the FireReady app and is now available from the App Store or Google Play. Keep a watch on the Facebook and Twitter accounts, ABC radio or the hotline 1800 226 226. Stay safe this fire season!